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  • staker
    replied
    Thanks for the replies. I will give it a try on a small piece in the future and see how I like it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete Staehling
    replied
    Originally posted by smallerstick View Post
    Personally, my preference goes toward shellac or wiping varnishes followed by wax. Yes, fumes are present, but the durability of these true finishes is proven.
    It probably isn't everyone's cup of tea.

    We have a local guy doing a lot or restaurant interior work who has switched to Odies and says his customers have had great luck with the finish holding up in that high wear environment. He said he has had a number of customers ask to have other locations redone in Odies after living with it in one location.

    In my experience the finished product is a lot like a well cured tung oil without the hassle or slow/unreliable curing, but I agree it is not a film finish that builds up on the wood like shellac or varnish.

    In the past I have used a hybrid finish of equal parts 100% tung oil, urethane varnish, and mineral spirits. I rubbed it on by hand and buffed it off. The finish was very nice. The urethane helped fill the pores and cure the tung oil more quickly and reliably. Odies finished product looks very similar but I think slightly better. It goes on a little easier, with no fumes. I have been very happy with it as have been my customers. Most of my work is in the form of stringed musical instruments. I also offer hand rubbed sprayed lacquer, but seldom have a customer ask for it.

    One nice thing about Odies is that since it isn't a film finish, fixing or touching up a finish is easy. You can even apply more finish over their wax without stripping it (all their products are compatible).

    I'd recommend giving it a try, but don't skimp on going through all the grits and sand to a very fine grit if you want a nice finish. I like to go to at least 600 and sometimes go a couple grades higher if I want a really nice finish. Since my work pieces are small going a couple extra grades is a pretty minimal effort.

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  • smallerstick
    replied
    The MSDS sheet describes this as "A proprietary blend of all-natural FDA approved food safe oils and waxes." By definition then, it is not a finish but a surface treatment much like BLO, mineral oil, beeswax and other similar products and combinations of products.
    Personally, my preference goes toward shellac or wiping varnishes followed by wax. Yes, fumes are present, but the durability of these true finishes is proven.
    Bob Flexner, in his book, describes oil and wax products and their characteristics very thoroughly. It's worth a read and should answer all the possible questions about oils and waxes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete Staehling
    replied
    I really like it. It does require going through all the sanding to a fine grit first, but it goes on super easy and results in a great finish if you sand to a fine enough grit for the quality of finish you want. The price seems high, but when you consider that the coverage is about 10x most finishes per volume it isn't bad.

    Nothing in it is toxic or noxious so it is pleasant to work with. It smells nice so you don't have to worry about getting it on your skin or breathing in any nasty fumes.

    Leave a comment:


  • staker
    started a topic Odie's oil

    Odie's oil

    Has anyone tried this finish and what are the results?
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