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  • Greg from K/W
    replied
    Turpinine is one of the worst things for a healthy surface. Odies is food safe. You can't use that stuff on a serving platter or charcuterie board.

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  • stickman
    replied
    I use dainish oil and turpentine. I do not sand very fine and that's because I want it to soak in and protect the outer "skin" of the wood. to make it penetrate more I stop about 80 or 100 and thats enough sanding. more will affect absorption. If more absorbs it toughens the wood near the surface. I let the initial coat sit on the wood 30 mins beforee dry down to get more penetration. later coats can be wiped on and wiped off more quickly. I dont add stain or colors to the first few coats because that tends to fill in any scratches and amplify issues. If I want darker I add some colors but after a few coats are down.

    It does not sit on top of the wood like lacquer or other finishes. If I want a finer finish I apply more oil with wet or dry sandpaper and work it in , wet sanding with the oil. this fills the pores with the dust. after each application it's wiped off. If I want to renew the finish I just put more. the drawback is that it takes time but I generally just apply it in stages as I work about on other things. It's usually fast to just wipe on a coat and dry down. I can do more a year down the road after it is in place.
    linseed , or danish oil do dry, they do not stay oily, It is a finish but unlike other finishes that sit on top of the wood, it doesn't act as a filter and block the beauty of the wood. the oil seems to enhance the grain and makes it
    pop" the thing I've found with a lot of the water based finishes is that water raises the grain and they dont seem to enhance the look of the wood so much.

    I dont mind the smell of turpentine but in a closed room the water based finishes might be easier to cope with.
    One thing I like about the way I do it, I don't care if it is dusty , no clean room or paint booth needed. the finish is relatively easy to look after and seems to take a lot of wear. I always have the option to sand more if defects appear in the finish, I can sand and keep going. if it gets scratched up I can usually just apply more and it hides the marks. With a topcoat you have to remove it to fix issues like scratches that happen after the finish is applied.

    in a restaurant where they are constantly wiping a topcoat type finish may be best, poly usually looks crappy but it is pretty impervious to wiping and water. It is tough. a spray on finish like lacquer is faster for a commercial application. Some of the finishes like they use on laminate floors in the factories must be UV cured and they do take a lot of wear, but for some reason I just like the stuff I use and dont want to change. most of what I do is house parts not furniture so the finish I'm after is basically the look of the wood not the look of a coating, or shell on top of the wood. sometimes if I want more protection, like on floors I'll use oil based poly but i still use danish oil and turps for the first three coats or so. I do want the natural darkening that happens for a few years after application to occur because that suits my 1920's house. Some of the water based finishes have a UV blocker. You might want that if you wanted a very pale look, maybe in a gymnasium or a modern house with a maple floor?
    Sometimes I restore 1930's furniture and most of that is lacquer so I use that because there it is authentic to the piece but for that i need to worry about dust and the smell is quite strong and then I need to wash my spray gun or use a spray can. if the original finish is lacquer the same finish works well as it wont absorb into where there is a finish but dry spots and scratches absorb it, where the lacquer is intact it wipes off, no absorption, so it wont sit on top of the lacquer. If I dont wish to refinish a piece then I do that to just make it look acceptable without going too far.

    I really haven't used many of the modern water based finishes I'm interested to learn how others like them and why. smell is an obvious advantage to water based stuff.









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  • theteach
    replied
    I'll throw my 2 cents in too. I was skeptical about Odie's since the claims I saw on their web site and other places seemed over the top. I decided to buy a jar and I haven't looked back. I use it on everything now. I've done a dining table and chairs along with several smaller pieces.

    I find the info on their site confusing. It seems like the only real difference between their products is the concentration of wax. The original Odie's has some wax, butter has a bit more, and the wax is mostly wax (obviously). I haven't used it but I think the Super everlasting oil is mostly or all oil. The other difference is Dark vs. Original. The dark should allow some oxidization with age and the wood and grain will appear a little darker over time. I've used the dark a few times but I can't say that I saw a huge difference. I should have taken a picture right after applying the finish and then again 6 months later to see if I could tell.

    As others have said the finish is a bit fussy as it cures. I have found it takes about two weeks to cure depending on the temperature, humidity, and moisture content of the wood. For the dining table, we used placemats and were very careful for the first month. The other pieces I put in place after about 24 hours and they have all been fine.

    Sand to the highest grit possible. For the dining table, I sanded to 800.

    I use one or two coats depending on how the piece is being used. Typically I will put a coat on and let it sit on the wood for between 30 mins and an hour. If I go back and there are dry spots I apply more. Once I go back and the piece still looks wet then I leave it another hour or so and then either machine or hand buff it until it is dry to the touch. If I'm doing a second coat I then leave it for at least 24 hrs and then do the same procedure again.

    I've used it on walnut, maple, and pine pieces so far. It has worked well on everything I've tried. Good luck with the shelves.

    Leave a comment:


  • mharrison
    replied
    Originally posted by Greg from K/W View Post
    You need advice go on Facebook and search for Ofearthfurniture. Matt is a fantastic guy that helps out in any way he can does and goes above and beyond. He is the Canadian Rep for Odies Oil. He knows everything about it that anyone could ever need or want to know.

    Here is his instagram. https://www.instagram.com/ofearthfurniture/?hl=en
    Thanks, I will have to check him out (I'm not a big facebook user, and don't have instagram), but will look him up and see if i can find some info to help me decide what to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg from K/W
    replied
    You need advice go on Facebook and search for Ofearthfurniture. Matt is a fantastic guy that helps out in any way he can does and goes above and beyond. He is the Canadian Rep for Odies Oil. He knows everything about it that anyone could ever need or want to know.

    Here is his instagram. https://www.instagram.com/ofearthfurniture/?hl=en
    Last edited by Greg from K/W; 12-30-2020, 08:44 PM.

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  • TCustom Design
    replied
    Personally, I prefer OSMO polyx for a simple wipe on finish. I have found that Odie's takes too long to cure, and prior to that curing, it is(in my experience) very prone to water marks, and premature wear. Osmo seems ready to rock after 2 coats, and 24-48 hours. Odies, some say, take up to 3 weeks to cure. Odie's smells nicer, and is easier to clean up, but I just can't store my pieces for min. 3 weeks before moving them out of my little space.

    Otherwise, it is a great looking/feeling finish. I do like it as a simple "one shot" finish for low wear pieces, when I want a hand rubber look(picture frames, little shelves, etc).

    Simon

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  • beachburl
    replied
    It's like just about any finish - some swear by it; some swear at it.
    You can't tell until you've used it which you'll be.

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  • bender
    replied
    Here's a shameless plug for him.

    https://www.symanwoodcarving.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • bender
    replied
    A friend who uses my bandsaw uses Odie's exclusively for his carvings. He gets a great looking finish with it. I've got a few of his carvings in my home and it's held up well on them.

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  • mharrison
    replied
    hi all. I have been looking at the Odie's product line out of necessity, and am wondering if anyone that has used it can help me out. I have a walnut live edge shelf to finish (for starters, likely an ash and potentially cherry in near future), with no shop space and a Manitoba winter to content with, which means my living room becomes my finishing station. I have read all the social media hype, is it that good (if you follow the instructions)? I ask because if the odor islow and as pleasent as most claim, would be great option.

    also wondering about the oil vs the butter as the finish? i have read and understand the oil will solidify on top if not used, and as i only have the 2-3 projects of maybe 16 sq feet total both sides, would likely not use up the oil before that layer would waste a portion of the jar.

    also wondering about the Super Duper Everlasting Oil, as it does not give much info, is it just a thinned-down version? and is the Oxi Oil a better option over the Dark versions? it really seems like they are similar products, but there must be some things one does better than another.

    That said, I know Tried & True might be another option.

    thanks in advance for the advice and guidance.

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  • staker
    replied
    Thanks for the replies. I will give it a try on a small piece in the future and see how I like it.

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  • Pete Staehling
    replied
    Originally posted by smallerstick View Post
    Personally, my preference goes toward shellac or wiping varnishes followed by wax. Yes, fumes are present, but the durability of these true finishes is proven.
    It probably isn't everyone's cup of tea.

    We have a local guy doing a lot or restaurant interior work who has switched to Odies and says his customers have had great luck with the finish holding up in that high wear environment. He said he has had a number of customers ask to have other locations redone in Odies after living with it in one location.

    In my experience the finished product is a lot like a well cured tung oil without the hassle or slow/unreliable curing, but I agree it is not a film finish that builds up on the wood like shellac or varnish.

    In the past I have used a hybrid finish of equal parts 100% tung oil, urethane varnish, and mineral spirits. I rubbed it on by hand and buffed it off. The finish was very nice. The urethane helped fill the pores and cure the tung oil more quickly and reliably. Odies finished product looks very similar but I think slightly better. It goes on a little easier, with no fumes. I have been very happy with it as have been my customers. Most of my work is in the form of stringed musical instruments. I also offer hand rubbed sprayed lacquer, but seldom have a customer ask for it.

    One nice thing about Odies is that since it isn't a film finish, fixing or touching up a finish is easy. You can even apply more finish over their wax without stripping it (all their products are compatible).

    I'd recommend giving it a try, but don't skimp on going through all the grits and sand to a very fine grit if you want a nice finish. I like to go to at least 600 and sometimes go a couple grades higher if I want a really nice finish. Since my work pieces are small going a couple extra grades is a pretty minimal effort.

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  • smallerstick
    replied
    The MSDS sheet describes this as "A proprietary blend of all-natural FDA approved food safe oils and waxes." By definition then, it is not a finish but a surface treatment much like BLO, mineral oil, beeswax and other similar products and combinations of products.
    Personally, my preference goes toward shellac or wiping varnishes followed by wax. Yes, fumes are present, but the durability of these true finishes is proven.
    Bob Flexner, in his book, describes oil and wax products and their characteristics very thoroughly. It's worth a read and should answer all the possible questions about oils and waxes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete Staehling
    replied
    I really like it. It does require going through all the sanding to a fine grit first, but it goes on super easy and results in a great finish if you sand to a fine enough grit for the quality of finish you want. The price seems high, but when you consider that the coverage is about 10x most finishes per volume it isn't bad.

    Nothing in it is toxic or noxious so it is pleasant to work with. It smells nice so you don't have to worry about getting it on your skin or breathing in any nasty fumes.

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  • staker
    started a topic Odie's oil

    Odie's oil

    Has anyone tried this finish and what are the results?
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