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  • TCustom Design
    replied
    Originally posted by oscar22 View Post
    Hi
    We are new to odies and used it on a couple of table surfaces...See image posted...getting white streaks when you run your hand over the wood. You can feel a slight grain, and when you flatten the other way it disappears. The manufacturer says we put too much oil on and need to use there solvent to remove excess (we prolly did use too much!) My question is....Was this not sanded enough and that is causing the white streaks?
    Was that CNC or router mill flattened? It looks like a trail from an endmill. If you can feel the grain, then you didn't sand enough. I wouldn't worry about using the solvent, most companies are really bad for telling their customers that their personal product is the only one that works, when, in reality, a whole bunch probably work lol.

    I'd let that sit for a week or two, go over the whole thing with 180/220/320 and buff in another coat of oil.

    Simon

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  • oscar22
    replied
    Hi
    We are new to odies and used it on a couple of table surfaces...See image posted...getting white streaks when you run your hand over the wood. You can feel a slight grain, and when you flatten the other way it disappears. The manufacturer says we put too much oil on and need to use there solvent to remove excess (we prolly did use too much!) My question is....Was this not sanded enough and that is causing the white streaks?

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg from K/W
    replied
    Osmo is food safe too if you want to use that. I have its a good product.

    Leave a comment:


  • stickman
    replied
    I remember a stink being raised about Chinese kids toys being made with lead in the paint. It made me reflect on a childhood toy we had where we melted lead to pour into molds to make our own toy soldiers and then painted them , probably with leaded paint too ;-) if you pour molten lead into a mold and the mold is wet at all it can really blow up and throw hot molten lead in your face.. there were toy soldiers with cigarettes too , my brother had those. If you lit them they burned quite a while , fun ;-)

    I'm not sure who the authority is but maybe if you tried to sell boards to a vendor like Walmart they might have some sort of test or want info about what is used, It could turn into bad PR if they were discovered to be selling anything controversial.

    Mohawk finishing supplies sells a foodsafe finish I saw some a friend applied yesterday. It looked ok. It was like some sort of clear varnish.

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg from K/W
    replied
    Your funny. Dink them ya no thanks. As far as other finishes unless they state they are food safe no I will not use them at all. There are regulations that they have to follow to be food safe. If they did that falsely the regulators would jump on them. Rightly so.

    Odies never said their Solvent was "Safe" They said it was a "Safer Solvent" To me that means not as harsh or volatile as others. It certainly does not mean it is perfectly safe and precautions need to still be taken. People need to take responsibility for their own safety not put it on the products they use. Safer does not mean hazard free.

    Leave a comment:


  • Leo Van Der Loo
    replied
    Originally posted by Greg from K/W View Post
    Leo I know it isn't the end all and Be all of finishes. THE OP asked about it though and I answered him. As far as any volatiles off it I can use it all day in my shop and there is no effect off it at all. Now its not a small shop but I do know that if I used other finishes I would not be able to stay in the shop after for the odour and fumes off it. So why all the Poo poo about it? I know it says to air the rags out. ALl I do it spread them on my table saw till they are dry and throw em in the garbage. Now big deal. It is food safe. A lot of other products are not. It would be perfectly fine for kids furniture and toys. So why the hate on the stuff?

    Have you used it your self?
    I did like you, and brought out what is in it, so the OP can make up his mind about it, as for food safe, officially al finishes are food safe after they are cured, but I would not drink any of them.

    Whatever you decides to do and use is up to you, the product MSDS calls for good ventilation, I would abide by that, it be safer IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg from K/W
    replied
    Leo I know it isn't the end all and Be all of finishes. THE OP asked about it though and I answered him. As far as any volatiles off it I can use it all day in my shop and there is no effect off it at all. Now its not a small shop but I do know that if I used other finishes I would not be able to stay in the shop after for the odour and fumes off it. So why all the Poo poo about it? I know it says to air the rags out. ALl I do it spread them on my table saw till they are dry and throw em in the garbage. Now big deal. It is food safe. A lot of other products are not. It would be perfectly fine for kids furniture and toys. So why the hate on the stuff?

    Have you used it your self?

    Leave a comment:


  • stickman
    replied
    thanks for posting the MSDS ,
    here is one from turpentine. I dont recognise the brand and there may be variation between brands.
    I have also heard of others that are a substitute or an "odorless" variation.

    https://uwaterloo.ca/fine-arts/sites...2015-11-02.pdf

    I cant' speak for how hazardous it would be to use it on a food platter or breadboard but I do wonder if in reality one would be likely to injest enough turpentine to cause a reaction by using the board after the application has had some time. Perhaps if a product is sold commercially that would present an issue in some way so If one is doing that then the solvent could be even more important.

    Leave a comment:


  • Leo Van Der Loo
    replied
    Originally posted by Greg from K/W View Post
    Its a lot less volatile than paint thinner lacquer thinner or other solvents you could use Leo. I know that is can combust but its a lot less hazardous than a lot of other products out there. I use them a lot and like them. Its the only finish I will use because of the ease of application and clean up. Plus it smells a lot better than anything on the market.
    We do know that there are worse products to use, but Odie's is not the be all end all, not even a real finish, unless you think wax is a finish.

    And it is not a safe product to use inside a room without good ventilation, smelling nice or not.

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  • Greg from K/W
    replied
    Its a lot less volatile than paint thinner lacquer thinner or other solvents you could use Leo. I know that is can combust but its a lot less hazardous than a lot of other products out there. I use them a lot and like them. Its the only finish I will use because of the ease of application and clean up. Plus it smells a lot better than anything on the market.

    Leave a comment:


  • Leo Van Der Loo
    replied
    Originally posted by Greg from K/W View Post
    They used to give patients Mercury for a cure too would you want some now? I still wouldn't use Turpentine as a food grade wood finish. There are a lot better natural products like Odies out there.
    Turpentine is NOT a finish, it is a volatile that evaporates, used to thin a real finish like Polymerized Tung Oil, which is a durable tough food safe/grade finish, not some fancy wax and smelly (nice?) oils.

    I just looked up the thinners in Odie's oil, also called Odie's safer solvent, (How safe is it ??)

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Odie's safer solvent.jpg Views:	0 Size:	85.7 KB ID:	1320368


    And this for use indoors exposure.

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    So what to believe, or is there another word for flammable ??

    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by Leo Van Der Loo; 03-04-2021, 02:42 PM.

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  • billh
    replied
    Turpentine oil is used in various fragrances and creams that people rub on themselves. Distilled turpentine oil is used as a food flavoring and there are people who take it internally for various reasons. So I'd say it is a long, long way from a dose of arsenic, another natural product BTW. I really don't see how people get worried about picking up a slice of pepperoni from a cutting or charcuterie board and think it is coated in the finish. Transfer would be close to zero and likely is zero on a cured finish.
    billh

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  • Greg from K/W
    replied
    They used to give patients Mercury for a cure too would you want some now? I still wouldn't use Turpentine as a food grade wood finish. There are a lot better natural products like Odies out there.

    Leave a comment:


  • stickman
    replied
    turpentine was used for centuries for medical uses. I was reading an old book where it said for a toothache to put it on a cotton wad, stick it down in your cavity , but it also mentioned using opium to kill the pain which of course dates it. it was used for many other medicinal reasons.
    i wouldn't go drinking the stuff but maybe if it's on a breadboard or something the amount that could be ingested from off the board might be pretty minimal. basically Its from plants and some plants have the ability to kill or deter insects that attack them. I dont go soaking my hands in it or anything weird but if I get some on my hands I've never had any reaction. it might be less dangerous than some of the petroleum based solvents? Maybe it's a good question for someone who knows a bit more about terpenes and related biological chemistry and how that relates to humans. That's definitely not my area of wisdom..
    I know a lot of people that regularly use it to condition old wood like exterior house parts prior to painting The mold and bug rejection properties are beneficial and it helps the paint stick when you mix it with boiled linseed oil. I dont know what's in odies oil. it sounds like some proprietary mixture and they dont always release the data on the ingredients of such concoctions. sometimes the MSDS sheets allude to some of the ingredients. there are a lot of wood finish concoctions and proprietary secret mixtures.

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  • Greg from K/W
    replied
    Turpinine is one of the worst things for a healthy surface. Odies is food safe. You can't use that stuff on a serving platter or charcuterie board.

    Leave a comment:

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