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  • #16

    Re: Cutting board grain filling

    Originally posted by Rough to Refined View Post
    On the contrary to John's article this study by Milling, Annett & Kehr, Rolf & Wulf, Alfred & Smalla, Kornelia. (2005). Survival of bacteria on wood and plastic particles: Dependence on wood species and environmental conditions. Holzforschung. 59. 72-81. 10.1515/HF.2005.012., shows that even pine has antimicrobial properties, but again this is a controlled study, not real life.
    I would love to see the article complete, but I was only able to find the abstract. I would like to know if the article addresses the difference between E-coli cultivated in sawdust (as per the abstract) vs the same amount cultivated on solid wood board.

    The survival of two hygienically relevant bacteria, Escherichia coli pIE639 and Enterococcus faecium, was followed on wooden sawdust of seven different European woods (pine, spruce, larch, beech, maple, poplar, and oak) versus polyethylene chips by using cultivation-dependent and molecular-based methods in parallel. The survival of the bacteria on wood was dependent on various factors such as the wood species, the type of the inoculated bacterium, the ambient temperature, and humidity. The bacterial titre decreased fastest on pine followed by oak compared to the other woods and plastic. Cultivation-independent analysis employing DNA extraction, Southern blot hybridisation, and PCR-based detection of marker genes of the test bacteria confirmed this result. The decline in bacterial numbers correlated with the decrease of bacterial DNA in the samples. Amounts of DNA of E. coli and E. faecium recovered from pine and oak-wood sawdust were generally lower compared to the other woods and plastic.

    The presented study shows that pine and oak exhibit substantially better hygienic performance than plastic and indicates an antibacterial effect caused by a combination of the hygroscopic properties of wood and the effect of wood extractives.

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    • #17

      Re: Cutting board grain filling

      Originally posted by Rough to Refined View Post
      Leo, I think you answered your own question... this particular article warns against the use of softwoods, which suggests that not all woods are created equally in this context.


      Would you mind citing those screen shots you provided above?
      There is nowhere a mention of softwood used or hardwood, you can try to read the quote again.

      I was quoting a science report, and would think that this is not irresponsible, it is not an off the cuff remark that all wood are safe.
      Last edited by Leo Van Der Loo; 11-08-2021, 11:11 PM.

      Have fun and take care
      Leo Van Der Loo

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      • #18

        Re: Cutting board grain filling

        You can find good and bad about every type of cutting board and overall it seems that how they are cleaned is the important factor. We use LV composite whatever it is, plastic and a wooden one. So far for years no medical issues at all and BTW, cleaning has only been a manual washing with water and dishwashing detergent which admittedly isn't the total recommended treatment. I hope nobody thinks real poor practice is overcome by some wood.
        billh
        Last edited by billh; 11-09-2021, 12:59 PM.
        Rough to Refined likes this.

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        • #19

          Re: Cutting board grain filling

          Here is some more info on the subject.

          ​​​​​
          ​​​​​​​https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31113021/

          https://meridian.allenpress.com/jfp/...d-Contaminated

          ​​​​​​​http://www.treenshop.com/Treenshop/A...verArticle.pdf




          ​​​​​​​

          Have fun and take care
          Leo Van Der Loo

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          • #20

            Re: Cutting board grain filling

            often oils are mixed with turpentine, the turps help carry the oil into the wood. Turpentine is also a natural antiseptic. my interpretation is that new car smell is worse and we get exposed to it a lot , new carpets etc etc. Plastic compounds release stuff and so do the products used for mold release.

            What's "healthy or safe" I cant comment. as kids most of us had a breadboard in the kitchen and I can't recall ever hearing of anyone getting sick from a breadboard. we'd pull it out and wipe it of and put it back and some just used them for bread and never cleaned them much , but they were so common we never really gave it a lot of thought.

            I did meet a guy that had a Brita water filter which he removed from use and began using again for a while and it took time for them to realize whey the whole family was getting sick. the thing was polluting their water supply instead of cleaning it. If they just drank the tap water they would have been fine, we have great water here.
            the moral on that was if you use one fine, keep it full an in the fridge and you are ok but if you let the filter sit around on the counter after it catches a bunch of gunk then that can be a danger so if you take it out of use, just chuck that filter.

            my fridge had one ,and it makes ice or cold water.. it is 100 bucks to replace, I threw it away , it came with a bypass plug thing..



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