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  • Change is Good

    I have sometimes been a little envious of some of the members here being able to devote so much time into their woodworking. Well I guess it's my time now. It's been almost three weeks now but the economy has sidelined my almost 30 year career with the same company. By keeping my spending at normal levels we are set to July. Fortunately the monies had already been set aside for our 20 year anniversary cruise so that is still going ahead. And after two weeks of work around the house and this past week recovering from a nasty flu I am ready to hit the workshop. The first project on my wifes to do list for me is to finish the valance in the kitchen. The under cabinet lighting has been in for six months now but the valance is still in uncut lengths in the shop. My question is about the stains I tried not giving me the tone of colour I want. The existing cabinets are red oak with a fruitwood stain. When I use the fruitwood stain the colour is nowhere near the cabinets. I have seen tinted poly on store shelves. Can I tint my own poly? Can I mix my oil based fruitwood stain and mix it with water based poly? Or should I stick to the same either both water or both oil?
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  • #2

    Re: Change is Good

    Re: Change is Good

    Hey Ed---30 years working---you must be just about at the time to rest. Yep the economy is in the toilet. Got the solution.

    Head to the workshop---do what you want---take your wife on the cruise---relax till July----but keep your eyes open. Was in the same boat 15 years ago---worried like hell and had a heart attack. Was luckey--still here and realized the almighty $ was not as important as I once thought. You never know maybe you could make a few $$$$ from your shop

    Now to the question at hand---if your in one of the new sub-divisions and you knew who built your houe---give them a call and maybe they can give you the finish that was used.

    What I have done when matching new to old finish was to take a door to Randalls and have them match the stain in a qt size container. Go to the one on Bank---the fellow has been there for years and is good plus you really dont pay any more for the stain and he will probably give you some tips on matching the actual finish---lacquer-shellac or whatever was originally used.

    Hope it helps
    "Born 50 years too late"

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    • #3

      Re: Change is Good

      Re: Change is Good

      Sorry to hear you lost your job Ed. That really sucks.
      It does have me curious though. If you don't mind my asking, what did you do for a living?
      Did you know this was coming? Was it a big layoff? How did they justify letting you go after 30 years? Was it a buy out or early retirement?
      Just curious. Don't answer if you don't want to.
      J.P. Rap Mount Hope Ont.
      Carpe Ductum (Seize The Tape)


      "In this world, you must be oh so smart, or oh so pleasant." Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. Elwood P. Dowd

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      • #4

        Re: Change is Good

        Re: Change is Good

        Ed,

        Take a door to Randall's in Bell's Corners and they will make you a custom stain to match. Let us know what you do for a living, plenty of eyes and ears on this forum can keep a lookout.
        Paul

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        • #5

          Re: Change is Good

          Re: Change is Good

          Hi Big_Mac. Can't afford to lay back permanently yet. Too many debts. Our house is eight years old and one of those builders box houses. The cabinets came from a factory in the Toronto area. I think it was called something like Canac. I do have a couple of spare doors. However the problem is the the fruitwood stain I have does not cover the more dense (lighter) portions of the oak. I have tried three applications and the denser parts are still too pale. The current doors are a light brownish colour on the lighter wood to a darker brown on the capillaries. It looks like the door is almost painted with a washed out light brown. Hense the question about mixing a stain with poly. Should I just buy a can of the tinted stuff?

          Great idea OttawaP. There's a Benjamin Moore store in town here. I'll check with them first.

          J.P. and OttawaP, I worked in the telephony field, software engineer. It is a local private company with international operations ( not Nortel ) and was founded by a couple of British entrepreneur's in the early 70's. Not sure of the numbers affected but I'm also not sure it is over yet. They were still laying off people last week that were returning from business trips. I think that globally the count is between 100 and 150, with about 50% in the Ottawa area.

          Thanks for the support guys.

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          • #6

            Re: Change is Good

            Re: Change is Good

            Well I went to Benjamin Moore this afternoon with door in hand. The sales clerk there recommended I try Bonds Decor in a nearby industrial park. The sales clerk at Bonds suggested a gel. He pulled a piece of oak laminate from under the counter and applied some. Fantastic. His message was that the liquid stains are very thin, and even though you may put several coats on, the one gel coat is still much more intense. This is my first experience with gel. I think it will work out great. Soon as I got home I applied some to a scrape piece of the valance. Wow. One coat of gel is very close to the colour of the exiting cabinets.

            Thanks for your help guys. A new world has been opened to me.

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