Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Workbench Finish

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Workbench Finish

    I am making the homemade version of a workbench finish I read about using Mineral Sprits, Boiled Linseed Oil, and Bees Wax. I mixed the spirits and wax together and it turned into a hand cream consistancy. When I rubbed this on a sample piece of maple it wipped on really nice. So nice in fact that I'm thinking of not bothering with the BLO. What is the purpose of the BLO in this mixture?
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: Workbench Finish

    Re: Workbench Finish

    Originally posted by Backflush View Post
    I am making the homemade version of a workbench finish I read about using Mineral Spirits, Boiled Linseed Oil, and Bees Wax. I mixed the spirits and wax together and it turned into a hand cream consistency. When I rubbed this on a sample piece of maple it wiped on really nice. So nice in fact that I'm thinking of not bothering with the BLO. What is the purpose of the BLO in this mixture?

    Actually there is a lot to this question.

    Boiled Linseed Oil -- so called because it was heated -- not boiled to incorporate lead (metallic drier) as a drier agent.

    Paints now use liquid driers that don't require heating -- but the name stuck.

    It is a protective oil, it takes a while to dry so it penetrates more than some. Some people believe this penetration help protects the surface of the wood -- it doesn't.

    Raw Linseed Oil is used mostly in outdoor protective finishes because it takes a long time to dry and stays more flexible. However, until it cures it does not provide much (if any) protection.

    Both Linseed Oil and Tung oil absorb oxygen to cure and become hard.

    Mineral Oil does not cure.

    Bees Wax is another issue...

    It smells great -- but does not protect a wood surface against dings and scratches -- it's a great polish.

    Melting Points

    Paraffin Wax -- 130 F Deg.
    Beeswax -- 140-150 F Deg.
    Carnuba -- 180F Deg.

    The mineral spirits was a solvent to help spread the wax. The BLO should have provided some hard film.

    Many people use these combinations because they add beauty and depth to finish of a small fine piece that does not need much protection.

    Years ago they were used because that was what was available.

    If you get a Copy of Understanding Wood Finishing -- by Bob Flexner you will find most of this around pages 75 and 88.


    Me -- I would have used a nice hard Polyurethane or Varnish finish and had done with it... They are reactive finishes and dry nice and hard with a good protective film.

    A water based (Acrylic, coalescing) type finish can be good too. Less fumes, easy cleanup etc. no VOC's -- dries clear. If you care about raised grain -- you "de-whisker" first. (De-whisker -- wipe with wet sponge -- dry overnight -- sand again.) Not as water or heat resistant as the Varnish/plastic finishes.
    ---
    Will

    “There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.” —- Mark Twain

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Workbench Finish

      Re: Workbench Finish

      Originally posted by Backflush View Post
      I am making the homemade version of a workbench finish I read about using Mineral Sprits, Boiled Linseed Oil, and Bees Wax. I mixed the spirits and wax together and it turned into a hand cream consistancy. When I rubbed this on a sample piece of maple it wipped on really nice. So nice in fact that I'm thinking of not bothering with the BLO. What is the purpose of the BLO in this mixture?
      .... I used boiled linseed oil (no dissolved wax) on my maple workbench and used it became it provides a measure of fairly long term protection and allows ease of repair and occasional replaning to keep the surface flat without the hassle of a hard film finish...... I wonder if the beeswax alone with be as long lasting or as impervious to drips and if I wanted the workbench surface to be as slippery as I presume a waxed finish alone might be; the BLO also impacts a nice warm colour to the wood without masking the grain.....

      ....if you go with wax alone, let us know in a year your experience...

      good luck

      michael

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Workbench Finish

        Re: Workbench Finish

        I finished my workbench with Antiqwax. I built it from four pieces of 3"x8" fir that were resawn from a 6"x8" beam. So far, it's been really good.

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Workbench Finish

          Re: Workbench Finish

          Use whatever you like!
          They all work and each has its own pluses and minuses.

          Here's the thing about work benches....you are going to do WORK on them so the finish will get brutalised.
          I would suggest something that does not form a film on top of the wood (like polyurethane as you will scratch it to death) ....but rather a penetrator like an oil..preferably something that cures up fairly quick (polymerised tung oil?) so you can touch it up easily when bored....that sort of thing or wax is a good choice also.
          Easy.
          Quick.
          And eminently repairable.
          Bees wax smells nice but it can take a fair bit of buffing I find....but then again..you choose.

          regards
          Julian

          Comment

          Working...
          X