Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Black dye on oak

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Black dye on oak

    A client wants an office suite in solid oak and black. Here is what I came up with after a few tests on extra pieces previously milled. On rift sawn red oak sanded to 120 grit I apply LV black aniline dye mixed in methyl hydrate and brush on with bristle brush. This dries very quickly and does not raise the grain. I then brush on 1# cut de-waxed shellac. This dries in about an hour and gets a very light sanding. I wipe on black pigment stain (minwax), let dry and apply wipe on poly. This yields a nice even deep black color while still showing the grain pattern but with an even color saturation.

    Pat

  • #2

    Re: Black dye on oak

    Re: Black dye on oak

    Originally posted by Patrice View Post
    A client wants an office suite in solid oak and black. Here is what I came up with after a few tests on extra pieces previously milled. On rift sawn red oak sanded to 120 grit I apply LV black aniline dye mixed in methyl hydrate and brush on with bristle brush. This dries very quickly and does not raise the grain. I then brush on 1# cut de-waxed shellac. This dries in about an hour and gets a very light sanding. I wipe on black pigment stain (minwax), let dry and apply wipe on poly. This yields a nice even deep black color while still showing the grain pattern but with an even color saturation.

    Pat
    Pat -- A nice and easy way is to use a spray stain and then topcoat. Looks great with 1/4 of the work.
    TVS.jpg

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Black dye on oak

      Re: Black dye on oak

      Hey Wally,

      Innovative stand for a flat screen, mind if I file the idea away for future use?

      Tried the one-two approach you describe but still had too much color depth variation between the seasonal rings. Plus the oak ended up a dull dark brown (pretty dark mind, but still brown) and I am after a truly black color. Now that I have a combination that works I'll likely spray the dye coat. Never tried spraying shellac. I don't mind ragging on wiping stain since you have to wipe anyway. I'm not setup yet to safely spray pre-cat solvent based lacquer. I don't have enough experience yet with WB lacquer to guarantee the results.

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Black dye on oak

        Re: Black dye on oak

        Originally posted by Patrice View Post
        Hey Wally,

        Innovative stand for a flat screen, mind if I file the idea away for future use?

        Tried the one-two approach you describe but still had too much color depth variation between the seasonal rings. Plus the oak ended up a dull dark brown (pretty dark mind, but still brown) and I am after a truly black color. Now that I have a combination that works I'll likely spray the dye coat. Never tried spraying shellac. I don't mind ragging on wiping stain since you have to wipe anyway. I'm not setup yet to safely spray pre-cat solvent based lacquer. I don't have enough experience yet with WB lacquer to guarantee the results.
        The spray stain is a like a dye and looks awful when you spray it but as soon as you hit it with the topcoat it jumps out at you. Here are some more pics if you are interested.
        TVS3.jpg

        TVS4.jpg

        TVS6.jpg

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Black dye on oak

          Re: Black dye on oak

          Originally posted by Patrice View Post
          A client wants an office suite in solid oak and black. Here is what I came up with after a few tests on extra pieces previously milled. On rift sawn red oak sanded to 120 grit I apply LV black aniline dye mixed in methyl hydrate and brush on with bristle brush. This dries very quickly and does not raise the grain. I then brush on 1# cut de-waxed shellac. This dries in about an hour and gets a very light sanding. I wipe on black pigment stain (minwax), let dry and apply wipe on poly. This yields a nice even deep black color while still showing the grain pattern but with an even color saturation.Pat
          Interesting, thanks. What is the purpose of the cut shellac layer between the aniline dye and minwax stain? I got great results doing an oak bar in deep mahogany reddish brown with just LV aniline dye and a stain, topped with 5 coats of polyurethane, but that's the limit of my experience with dark-colouring oak.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Black dye on oak

            Re: Black dye on oak

            Originally posted by kerfin View Post
            Interesting, thanks. What is the purpose of the cut shellac layer between the aniline dye and minwax stain?
            That is how I managed to achieve a more uniform black. Omitting the seal coat still gave me a dirty brown on the lighter parts of the grain.

            Comment


            • #7

              Re: Black dye on oak

              Re: Black dye on oak

              Patrice, do you have any pics you can post? I'd love to see it.

              Wally, that stand looks great! Thanks for the pics.
              -Mike

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Black dye on oak

                Re: Black dye on oak

                Originally posted by iamroot View Post
                Patrice, do you have any pics you can post? I'd love to see it.

                I'll certainly post photos when this thing is ready for delivery.

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Black dye on oak

                  Re: Black dye on oak

                  Seems like an awful lot of steps there Patrice

                  Wally's suggestion of a spray, no wipe stain is a good one. Definitely a time saver.
                  You could also apply black lacquer.

                  If you like the dye/stain approach, then may I suggest you obtain professional products, such those from ML Campbell or Becker Acroma (available in Moncton and Fredericton). You will get better colour and won't need a seal coat. A couple coats of clear lacquer and you'll have a very sharp looking office suite and save yourself a bunch of time which can be invested in the next paying, or non-paying, project.

                  How are you planning to avoid the open grain on the desk top? Unless the client wants that look.

                  Paul

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Black dye on oak

                    Re: Black dye on oak

                    guys, make life easy , problem is most black dyes and stains are actually a dark blue or green, notice the purple cast when you appply it, find a craft store and get some water based india Ink, its black , and it isnt kidding, add good slug to your water based or alcohol ( NGR as well) dye and roll on, top coat with anything, but remember, this stuff is serious, wear gloves and , ( im laughing), if not, well it will be some time before " natural " is seen again, best way to "ebonize" any thing... I promise

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X