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  • Homemade woodfiller?

    I have save the sanding dust from my recent project, it is red oak. I need to fill in some voids and chip out. I was gong to use regular wood filler, but I have this dust/flour from the sanding. I thought I could make up a paste/woodfiller.
    A couple of questions, 1. What proportion of sawdust to glue? and what type of glue? I have yellow carpenters glue, and Titebond 2. Also will this wood filler take a stain? and not stick out like a sore thumb when the whole piece is stained. Anyother issues or ideas that need to be addressed will be appreciated.

    Thanks Michael
    Churchill's definition of a parliamentary candidate. 'He is asked to stand, he wants to sit, he is expected to lie.'

  • #2

    Re: Homemade woodfiller?

    Re: Homemade woodfiller?

    I've done the glue/sawdust thing.

    It works ok, but honestly there are so many good fillers out there (Timbermate, Famowood, etc.), that are quite inexpensive and sand way better than sawdust/glue, that I would only do it again in a pinch.

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Homemade woodfiller?

      Re: Homemade woodfiller?

      Originally posted by Cayuga Kid View Post
      I have save the sanding dust from my recent project, it is red oak. I need to fill in some voids and chip out. I was gong to use regular wood filler, but I have this dust/flour from the sanding. I thought I could make up a paste/woodfiller.
      A couple of questions, 1. What proportion of sawdust to glue? and what type of glue? I have yellow carpenters glue, and Titebond 2. Also will this wood filler take a stain? and not stick out like a sore thumb when the whole piece is stained. Anyother issues or ideas that need to be addressed will be appreciated.

      Thanks Michael
      I would suggest hide glue. All the PVA glues are plastics and do not stain well.The other issue, practice better cabinetry skills and the problem goes away easier said than done ,I know !!

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Homemade woodfiller?

        Re: Homemade woodfiller?

        sawdust and woodglue will not absorb stain well if at all
        im with jay, better blades and techniques to avoid issues at the source
        my shop is a beaver lodge
        steve, sarnia, ont

        sigpic

        1940's Beaver Jointer

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        • #5

          Re: Homemade woodfiller?

          Re: Homemade woodfiller?

          Thanks again for the replies. Just as I thought, not worth the time and effort. I know my skills need improving, and with each and every project I gain new skills and improve on existing skills. One of the problems this time was the wood. I have a ton of red and white oak that I had mulled from trees from my wood lot, all air dried for 6+ years. For this project I picked through the wood with wildest grain, some ribbon stripe 1/4 sawn, some with really wild swirling patterns and contrasting colour.Try as I might I could not eliminate tear out, although final passes in through the planer were less the a 1/64.
          I realize that a thickness sander and or planing by hand would would go a long to eliminate the problem. I even tried misting the wood with fabric softner, it might have helped some, and the wood sure smelled nice. The tear out is not really deep but noticeable with a wash of mineral spirits on top.
          One question the above mentioned wood fillers like Famowood, were can they be purchased, as I do not recall seeing them in the Hamilton area
          Michael
          Churchill's definition of a parliamentary candidate. 'He is asked to stand, he wants to sit, he is expected to lie.'

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Homemade woodfiller?

            Re: Homemade woodfiller?

            >>>One question the above mentioned wood fillers like Famowood,

            There's a guy who hangs out here that sells it; I think he's in Mississauga. Here's a link:

            http://www.masterfinishing.ca/index....emart&Itemid=7

            Comment


            • #7

              Re: Homemade woodfiller?

              Re: Homemade woodfiller?

              Originally posted by Cayuga Kid View Post
              Thanks again for the replies. Just as I thought, not worth the time and effort. I know my skills need improving, and with each and every project I gain new skills and improve on existing skills. One of the problems this time was the wood. I have a ton of red and white oak that I had mulled from trees from my wood lot, all air dried for 6+ years. For this project I picked through the wood with wildest grain, some ribbon stripe 1/4 sawn, some with really wild swirling patterns and contrasting colour.Try as I might I could not eliminate tear out, although final passes in through the planer were less the a 1/64.
              I realize that a thickness sander and or planing by hand would would go a long to eliminate the problem. I even tried misting the wood with fabric softner, it might have helped some, and the wood sure smelled nice. The tear out is not really deep but noticeable with a wash of mineral spirits on top.
              One question the above mentioned wood fillers like Famowood, were can they be purchased, as I do not recall seeing them in the Hamilton area
              Michael
              Hi Michael
              Stop thinking power tools and discover the worth of scrapers both hand and scraper planes like Stanley 112 .Wild grain situations can often be tamed by scraping.

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Homemade woodfiller?

                Re: Homemade woodfiller?

                I had a recent discussion with the sales guy at Mohawk about weather the oil based type or the water based type of wood filler is best for an application, I was filling cracks in fir floors. He swore by the water based but when I asked why they sell both ( they even have a Mohawk brand of oil based filler and the Mohawk reducer to go with it )
                I asked what the pros and cons of either type were, and he was unable to answer my question, so much for his expertise I thought..
                I have used both and my finding were that the oil based was nicer for staining and it dries faster, but the water based stays in an unhardened state ( better working time) and needs no stinky chemicals. I think I liked the results of the oil based type best. I buy the dry pigments and mix that in to get the color right, and do samples (with the finish on them). I find the red pigment is hard to get all mixed in and sometimes I find it leaves some red streaks but I prefer to leave it a little inconsistent so my filling isn't one flat consistent color. Nicer to mix two colors that are close to what you want then sort of blend them as you use them, so like the wood, it isn't an even color throughout the patch.

                so just to piggyback off the original question..
                what kind of filler do you use , and why?

                I like to use masking tape to surround where I put he filler, then pull it away after applying the filler while it is still wet. I found it saved needing to sand as much to get rid of patches of stray filler from surrounding areas. also the patch then sits a little higher than the wood so after it dries ad shrinks it can be sanded or scraped flat to the surounding area, the thickness of the tape helps me lay it on a few thou higher than the surrounding area.

                I'd say almost every good woodworker needs to use some fillers for some projects, maybe just wood defects, maybe to hide sins, but there is a lot to practice to get it to go on invisibly, but it is possible.
                “The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” -Bertrand Russell

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