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  • Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

    I have been applying wb lacquer to the inside of cabinets, I am having some trouble with overspray affecting the end result. I have reduced my air pressure to try and limit the overspray but it is still affecting the back corners as well as the top and bottom. I was wondering what the proper technique is, should I be masking off and doing one face at a time, should I reduce the air pressure even more. The finish is General pre-cat lacquer from Wood Essence.

    Thanks
    Kevin M
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  • #2

    Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

    Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

    Kevin,

    I generally remove the back panels and spray them separately. I tape off any surfaces that are to be glued to protect from contamination.

    Mike

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    • #3

      Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

      Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

      Buy prefinished Ply and you don't have to worry about it. Unless you're using solid wood of course.
      "Do it Right!"

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      • #4

        Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

        I agree, buy pre finished or remove the back panels

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        • #5

          Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

          Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

          Sorry I should have mentioned these have stained interiors and are already assembled. I agree the prefinished is the way to go however these required staining.

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          • #6

            Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

            Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

            Originally posted by Kevin M View Post
            Sorry I should have mentioned these have stained interiors and are already assembled. I agree the prefinished is the way to go however these required staining.
            Cut your pressure down as low as you can go and still get a decent spray. Try not to shoot directly into the corner but do the side first and then the top and then the back and so forth with the edge of the spray just reaching the corner. Try it and see what happens. You can sand now after the first coat and just put a light one on at a time.

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            • #7

              Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

              Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

              I would be interested to know how many members of this forum actually enjoy the finishing aspect, whether is a hobby or being done as a profession. Although it is gratifying when all goes well there are countless times where a project ends up being average because of the finish. To all you that enjoy it and are good at it I that my hat off to you!

              Kevin

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              • #8

                Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                Thanks Wally, I'll try cutting back the pressure even more

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                • #9

                  Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                  Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                  Originally posted by Kevin M View Post
                  I would be interested to know how many members of this forum actually enjoy the finishing aspect, whether is a hobby or being done as a profession. Although it is gratifying when all goes well there are countless times where a project ends up being average because of the finish. To all you that enjoy it and are good at it I that my hat off to you!

                  Kevin
                  I enjoy spray finishing

                  It means payday is around the corner, he, he...

                  And to keep things interesting I'm always challenging myself to go faster, do better, sand less, etc..

                  Now that it has warmed up Kevin, you would be welcome to drop by with your gun and a cabinet or two.

                  Just remember, I drink OV

                  Cheers, Don
                  Don Kondra - Furniture Designer/Maker
                  Product Photography
                  My Acreage Bird Photographs

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                  • #10

                    Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                    Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                    Thanks Don, I could certainly use a lesson or two, I may take you up on that someday.

                    Kevin

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                    • #11

                      Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                      Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                      Removing the back will make a big difference.

                      In terms of other changes we need more information. What spray equipment do you have? tip size on gun and what air cap? what pressures are you running? paint and exterior temperature? how thick are you putting it on(measure with a wet mil gauge). what is paint viscocity?
                      Mark
                      www.masterfinishing.ca

                      Comment

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                      • #12

                        Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                        Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                        Originally posted by Kevin M View Post
                        I would be interested to know how many members of this forum actually enjoy the finishing aspect, whether is a hobby or being done as a profession. Although it is gratifying when all goes well there are countless times where a project ends up being average because of the finish. To all you that enjoy it and are good at it I that my hat off to you!

                        Kevin
                        I consider my finishing an integral part of my business. I do WAY too many woods, finishes, etc (never mind custom matches) to consider pre-finished ply. Actually, I dont see how you can even handle the stuff without marking it up in some way..

                        I do enjoy the finishing process. But, it took me many years to get "good" at it, and after 20 or so, I am still learning all the time. And, try to keep on top of new equipment and techniques.

                        AJC
                        Andrew J. Coholic
                        Joe Coholic Custom Furniture Ltd.

                        www.joecoholiccustomfurniture.com

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                          Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                          Originally posted by Kevin M View Post
                          I have been applying wb lacquer to the inside of cabinets, I am having some trouble with overspray affecting the end result. I have reduced my air pressure to try and limit the overspray but it is still affecting the back corners as well as the top and bottom. I was wondering what the proper technique is, should I be masking off and doing one face at a time, should I reduce the air pressure even more. The finish is General pre-cat lacquer from Wood Essence.

                          Thanks

                          Kevin M

                          My technique for spraying cabinet interiors is as follows:

                          I usually shoot a pretty "thin" (ie, I prefer to spray a little on the viscous side of things, vs too thick) fluid, as I feel you can set up your gun to spray a nice wet coat that will flow out nicely, and use your triggering and travel speed to make sure you are laying down an even, wet coat that will flow out but not too much material (to avoid runs/sags).

                          I start by spraying the underside of the interior (the top) and then work from one side, around the back, around to the other side, and always finish by laying a coat on the bottom. I work 99% of the time from the top downwards, so any overspray falls down, and gets shot over with a wet coat.

                          Done correctly, you get JUST enough overlap in the corners to get even coverage, but no runs. it is VERY easy to put too much on, in the upper side/back to top inside corners... which show up as sags on the upper edge of the back and sides. Only practice and experience will get you there.

                          As for the material viscosity, if you mix it thicker, I find that by the time you get the whole cabinet interior sprayed, the first parts are already drying enough to get dry spray, or dont flow out enough and it looks orange peel-ly. Thinner, allows me to spray quicker, get done faster and lay a wet coat over everything - although to achieve the correct dry film thickness you have to spray a few extra coats.

                          AJC
                          Andrew J. Coholic
                          Joe Coholic Custom Furniture Ltd.

                          www.joecoholiccustomfurniture.com

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                            Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                            Originally posted by Ajcoholic View Post
                            My technique for spraying cabinet interiors is as follows:

                            I usually shoot a pretty "thin" (ie, I prefer to spray a little on the viscous side of things, vs too thick) fluid, as I feel you can set up your gun to spray a nice wet coat that will flow out nicely, and use your triggering and travel speed to make sure you are laying down an even, wet coat that will flow out but not too much material (to avoid runs/sags).

                            I start by spraying the underside of the interior (the top) and then work from one side, around the back, around to the other side, and always finish by laying a coat on the bottom. I work 99% of the time from the top downwards, so any overspray falls down, and gets shot over with a wet coat.

                            Done correctly, you get JUST enough overlap in the corners to get even coverage, but no runs. it is VERY easy to put too much on, in the upper side/back to top inside corners... which show up as sags on the upper edge of the back and sides. Only practice and experience will get you there.

                            As for the material viscosity, if you mix it thicker, I find that by the time you get the whole cabinet interior sprayed, the first parts are already drying enough to get dry spray, or dont flow out enough and it looks orange peel-ly. Thinner, allows me to spray quicker, get done faster and lay a wet coat over everything - although to achieve the correct dry film thickness you have to spray a few extra coats.

                            AJC
                            Thanks Joe, I'm going to try thinning the urethane and spraying a wetter coat, as a novice it is a fine line between to thin and to wet! I have had good results with the exteriors however the interiors have proved to be a challenge for sure.

                            Kevin

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                            • #15

                              Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                              Re: Spraying cabinet interiors, what is the proper technique

                              It's all about technique, and this includes adjustments to the spray gun, often "on the fly". If possible I remove the back as this cuts down most of the "bounce back" that gives problems. If I'm making the piece, then I'll prefinish before glue up/final assembly. If neither of these, then top, side/back/side (I start at left and work around) then bottom. As others have said, don't spray directly into the corners.
                              As Mark pointed out, we might be able to give more specific advice if we knew what equipment you were using. In general, you need to turn the air down as much as possible. Some guns allow you to vary the fan shape/orientation and this can be a big help. I usually turn the cap so I can spray with a vertical motion on the sides and trigger off before hitting the top or bottom. A cardboard box is a good place to start practicing. You can spray water to get a feel for the gun rather than expensive finish.
                              Finally a word of caution on thinning waterbased finishes. They do not react the same way as solvent based. In fact thinning could make your problems worse. It is better to add a retarder than water, but if you must, then I don't advise more than 5%. Unless using as a sealer or a toner, I never dilute my wb finishes. It's all about the viscosity, and a simple Ford#4 viscosity cup, together with a wet mil gauge, can be your best asset.
                              As for liking finishing, I'm biased because I run my own refinishing/finishing business. I would not do it unless I enjoyed it. I'm always learning something and there is a high degree of pride in turning a beaten up piece into a thing of beauty. Like Don, the final coat means the cheque is coming soon.
                              Good luck.....................paul
                              Last edited by Paul O in Paris; 02-13-2013, 08:44 AM.

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