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  • Wood storage

    Hi,
    I'm kinda newish at woodworking. People on many threads have suggested that its better to buy wood as you need it and not keep much in stock, but every time I buy wood, I have to let it dry and adjust to the climate of the house before working it.

    I use quite a bit of 2X6 and 2X10 pine (for a hobbyist in a basement workshop). Wouldn't it make more sense to keep a stock of it on hand so I always have dry wood and the dryer it is the better?

    Also, if I was to stock wood, is it better to let it dry a couple of days, then joint/plane it before storing long term to dry properly, or stock it as is and joint/plane it as needed?

    Last thing while I'm on the subject, can anyone suggest a decent inexpensive moisture meter? I've been thinking no-prong.

    Thanks for your input!
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  • #2

    Re: Wood storage

    I would say if you have the space to store it and are pretty sure you will use it, it makes sense to keep stock on hand especially if you can pick up good deals when you find them or buy in large enough quantities to get better pricing. I don't have a lot of space for storage so don't have a lot of stock but I do have some wood I picked up on Craigslist years ago for a great price and don't regret it.
    WeQuick likes this.

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    • #3

      Re: Wood storage

      Whenever I buy wood I get an extra piece or two "just in case". If I am lucky enough to avoid errors then I get to build up a small stock of different species so I can readily build something if the inspiration strikes. It can never hurt to have a few extras tucked away.
      WeQuick likes this.
      The only water in the Forest is the river.

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      • #4

        Re: Wood storage

        Yeah I would keep some on hand always for those moments of inspiration! It's really annoying to have to wait until you get wood to start a project, because life almost always gets in the way for me.... I can get to a mill saturday mornings if imlucky and if i dont, i have to wait a week. So I try to keep a few pieces of everything and only get large amounts for the larger projects that need planning anyway. Check out my build thread in the shop discussion area, I have a reasonably space efficient wood and sheet good storage solution

        Sent from my SM-G920W8 using Tapatalk

        WeQuick likes this.

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        • #5

          Re: Wood storage

          A nice stockpile is nice. Seasoned wood as needed. Allows for good buys. Store it properly and dimension when used.
          Rod Sheridan and WeQuick like this.
          Egon
          from
          The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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          • #6

            Re: Wood storage

            Hmmm ... 2X6 and 2X10 pine ... are we talking about construction grade lumber, or furniture grade lumber. If it is construction grade lumber, it is not dried enough to use for anything other than construction. If you want to use this type of lumber, you are going to have to allow it to dry further. Sticker it, weigh it down (or clamp together) and let it sit for a month before you even consider what you want to do with it.

            If it is furniture grade and properly dried, then I don't do anything to it before storage ... especially reducing the thickness. When it comes time to use it, then joint and plane it to the thickness that you need. The wood will move slightly during storage so you will have to joint and plane anyway it just before using it. You may find you need that extra thickness you removed before you stored it. When it comes time to use the lumber, I will joint and plane to just over the thickness I need and let it sit over night. I then bring it to the final size.
            WeQuick likes this.
            the other Ken
            ------
            "Each flitch, each board, each plant can have only one ideal use. The woodworker, applying a thousand skills, must find that ideal use and then shape the wood to realize its true potential" - George Nakashima

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            • #7

              Re: Wood storage

              Thanks for the input everyone!!
              Jointing/planing just before using the wood because of expansion makes sense. I had just figured that working the wood first would make it clamp square and tight and make it dry nice, but I hadn't considered natural expansion.

              Anyone have any input on moisture meters?

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              • #8

                Re: Wood storage

                I have this one, seems to work OK but I don't have experience with any other ones for comparison and you did indicate you wanted pinless.


                http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/pag...=1,43513,45788
                dwoody likes this.

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                • #9

                  Re: Wood storage

                  Originally posted by WeQuick View Post
                  Thanks for the input everyone!!
                  Jointing/planing just before using the wood because of expansion makes sense. I had just figured that working the wood first would make it clamp square and tight and make it dry nice, but I hadn't considered natural expansion.

                  Anyone have any input on moisture meters?
                  That works well also. Probably the best method but it does add extra milling time.
                  WeQuick likes this.
                  Egon
                  from
                  The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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                  • #10

                    Re: Wood storage

                    Originally posted by WeQuick View Post
                    Thanks for the input everyone!!
                    Jointing/planing just before using the wood because of expansion makes sense. I had just figured that working the wood first would make it clamp square and tight and make it dry nice, but I hadn't considered natural expansion.

                    Anyone have any input on moisture meters?
                    I store wood, it allows it to acclimatize to my shop.

                    That meter works well, I use a megger on the 500 volt range as I own one..................Rod.

                    P.S. Within reason, don't get hung up on absolute moisture content. If equilibrium in your shop is 10% or 6% that's fine. What you don't want is most of the project made with one level of moisture content, and then 2 pieces of much different moisture content.

                    After the wood has been in your shop a few months, it will be the same as your other stock.
                    Last edited by Rod Sheridan; 01-23-2019, 08:46 AM.
                    WeQuick likes this.
                    Work is the curse of the riding class.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Wood storage

                      Thanks!

                      I'm not looking to make a new throne for Mark Zuckerberg, I mostly make wall units, bed frames and plant stands, so I guess I'm mostly looking for something cheap and easy just for when I'm buying the wood. As long as I buy wood that isn't dripping wet and somewhat consistent, I expect after a few months in my controlled shop as you noted would be good enough for my needs. So I think I can forgo the quality of a top of the line Wagner and settle for something that may be a little less accurate.

                      I saw this one that is not too basic and not too expensive ... any thoughts on it? :

                      https://www.amazon.ca/General-Tools-...ter+wood&psc=1

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                      • #12

                        Re: Wood storage

                        I try to store as little wood as possible

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                        WeQuick likes this.
                        Jerome
                        Canada's South Coast

                        Port Colborne On.
                        Every loaf of bread is a tragic tale of grains that could've become beer.......but didn't....

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                        • #13

                          Re: Wood storage

                          OMG!!! You STOLE my wood rack invention that I stole! (LOL) ... just my 2x4's are sideways ... Had a team of electricians here a few months ago, they saw the rack, their eyes litereally popped out of their heads and I'm guessing they were both anxious to get home to their stock of conduit tubing to build racks of their own, as that's all they talked about for the two hours they were here! LOL

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                          • #14

                            Re: Wood storage

                            I've never seen the need for a moisture meter since I don't buy green wood and I let it acclimatize well before starting a project. Having a "number" just complicates things in my mind. YMMV

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                            • #15

                              Re: Wood storage

                              Here's an article I came across which may prove helpful to those wanting a moisture meter.

                              Like most others, I purchase lumber in volume (usually a few hundred bd ft at a time), and always green, almost always purchased green from local sources (that means maple, oak, cherry and hickory). I usually pay in the $2 bd ft range, unless the lot is unusually good or bad. No picking through the stack is allowed when I get it like this. When I get it home I store it under the deck for the first year or so, then in the garage for another year, then move it into the shop where it'll sit for another year. I am continually purchasing more each year or so, and when I notice I've got too much stock on hand, I wean myself back from purchasing more... but it's hard not to go for it!!

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                              Purchasing lumber in this manner results in always having some unusual grain and featured stock on hand, and the thicknesses I need. But storage is indeed a challenge as like most of us, storage space is limited, especially in the shop. As you can see from the photos above, I store it mostly flat stacked wherever I have some space: behind my planer or saw, and on the lumber rack. Truth be told, I'd far prefer to store my lumber vertically where I could see individual boards more clearly and dig out the ones I want. What you're seeing on the lumber rack are mostly cutoffs.

                              Good luck with your woodworking!
                              All the best,

                              Marty

                              President of Kingston Wood Artisans https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

                              Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club

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