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  • #16

    Re: A new hobby on the horizon

    Remember these famous words: "gee hon, I can build you this if we buy this tool". A wood lathe should be considered too, they are a lot of fun and many different things can be easily made.

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    • #17

      Re: A new hobby on the horizon

      Welcome to the forum.

      I can only equate your desire to buy lower price/quality tools to you getting a 7x14 metal lathe to make/rework car parts from. You would find it extremely limiting and frustrating even with your background. However the choice is yours. It was suggested earlier that you buy a SawStop table saw and I second that. Since both of you are beginners and are learning as you go without good instruction, it could save one or both of you from a terrible accident as you become more proficient. They are not cheap but think about how you would do your job with your right thumb and forefinger cut in half. Woodworking is a great pastime and is more fun with better tools. They don't have to be top of the line but off the bottom a bit is better.

      Pete

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      • #18

        Re: A new hobby on the horizon

        I'd just keep your eye out for used tools and that way you get better quality, stay away from CTC and most of the new offshore garbage. I'd suggest you just shop for the tools you need for the job you are doing, rather than to buy a bunch of low end offshore quality stuff in anticipation of using it.

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        • #19

          Re: A new hobby on the horizon

          Welcome to the forum. Lots of good ideas but there is some suggestion that the offsite stuff is crap. In today’s market I can’t readily think of any new hobbyist machines that are made in North America. Saw Stop which always gets good reviews I believe is made in Taiwan.in my shop I have a slider made in Italy , a Grizzly bandsaw made somewhere in Asia, a 12 jointer made in Taiwan, a 20 inch planer made in China. Whether it be the $20,000 slider or the $700 Grizzly bandsaw. They all work flawlessly . Happy hunting.

          Brian
          billh and Frank D. like this.
          If your dreams don't scare you, you are not dreaming big enough

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          • #20

            Re: A new hobby on the horizon

            If you are doing some web surfing take a look at Steve Ramsey's Woodworking for Mere Mortals on You Tube. He tends to do a lot of projects with not a lot of high end equipment. Quite entertaining and educational. There are others as well, but he is quite popular, and isn't trying to sell people on the biggest and best.
            Everything that others have mentioned here is very good advice, but if it doesn't fit your economic needs or ideals of what you want to do, there are other alternatives. I try to buy the best that I feel I can afford.
            As others have already said, have fun and stay safe.
            Previously Wallace's Dad

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            • #21

              Re: A new hobby on the horizon

              Thank you all for the warm welcome, advice along with suggestions. My wife and I took some time to review everything we wanted to build together. We came up with sizes along with cost for almost everything we wanted to tackle.
              We made several purchases in early June in which filled out little shed with boxes. Took some time to make so benches, still need to get going on the welding table, however the days just don't seem long enough sometimes.
              We are not sure how or where to post pictures yet thou. Not much to share as of yet, however we managed to finish my wifes new wishing well out of cedar/spruce mix (since I burnt the other purchased 1 when we ran out of firewood several weekends ago)
              We also made a rustic mailbox for our shed since nobody else had 1.
              We are looking forward to participating more as time goes on!!!
              Again, thank you all for the warm welcome.

              Eric & Christine

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              • #22

                Re: A new hobby on the horizon

                Welcome to the forum, one thing you may want to keep in mind since you are starting out in a small shop is to have casters on all the tools that are not consider bench top, for ex: table saw , 12" planer, even though it can be a bench top, those planers are heavy to move around. there is a couple example of tools you may want to have casters on them, easier to move around. Good luck
                Robert

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                • #23

                  Re: A new hobby on the horizon

                  id watch government asset sales, auctions, and garage sales. look for elders who are retiring. You may be in a position to buy their shop lock stock and barrel , wood scraps too. check craiglist and Kijiji often maybe facebook if you dont mind giving up your privacy rights.


                  If you are in tune with old cars then working on most machinery wont be any harder. the main things I'd look for are a decent tablesaw with about a 3-4HP motor and a 6 - 8 inch jointer. general, rockwell beaver or Canadian made general but not the offshore general international. there are other good brands. You'll know the difference between a decent casting and a chinese garbage casting. If you have the money and want to buy new the industrial sawstops aren't bad but you can definitely get going with less cost. Id prefer an old unisaw to the lesser home use type sawstop saws. The beismeyer fences were good then they patent rights changed a bit i guess because many others made copies and they are mostly all good. some really old craftsman saws and ones of those level usually have the motor driving the saw ,and you will see that type with the motor usually hanging off the back of the saw on a bracket. some of those did not have great fences. the more decent ones will have a couple of belts to the saws arbor and the motor is usually down in the cabinet.

                  the trunnions are important , if you compare the trunnions of a general or a rockwell you see decent castings. a lot of cheap saws have direct drive off the motor or a weak design in the area of the trunnions. one difference between a home use tablesaw, or a contractors saw and a cabinet saw, is that the trunnions are super robust on a cabinet saw. If it's a cabinetmakers saw then it will have more accuracy because of the robustness and weight of those parts. If you want to move the saw dont buy a cabinet saw. If you want to do quality work I wouldnt start with a home use craftsman saw from the 70's. Id look for a cabinet saw. those old craftsman/ beaver/rockwell home use saws are still useful for home craftsman that wanto build shelves, fences and do the odd thing , It just depends on what you expect from it. If you know you wanto to do more challenging work then I'd start with a real cabinet saw and then you aren't making that transition as you realize the difference.

                  I like older tools so I'd be the guy looking to buy a retired guys boxes rather than being frustrated with new garbage. some stuff that wears like files and saws maybe you are better to get new. old chisels are fine. some stuff like belt sanders and ROS sanders the newer multi tools, have seen some improvements.

                  most of the old stanley stuff is decent and useful. some of the new stuff is garbage. buyer beware, don't buy the "trusted" brand, instead forget about "trusted branding" look for quality of manufacture with the knowledge that everything made in the past 20 years is susceptible to offshore "cheapenization". one fast way to differentiate is to look at the fasteners and if you see a lot of ungraded fasteners it's probably a sign, if the fasteners have grade markings ( either lines on the head if standard or numbers if metric) with socket head cap screws it's hard to tell much about quality but if you see a whole lot of metric fasteners that are not graded then it wouldn't be the fasteners that are my concern but if they saved a nickle on the bolts by using cheap bolts then its an indication that they did the same sort of "economizing" to the rest of it. If the bearings are also all made in china ones then that's less easy to see. a lot of the new stuff also has really cheap plastic switches. older stuff used industrial quality switches , usually. some old machines had almost hand made fasteners and those may not have markings some really old british stuff is whitworth and if it's like that it's probably decent quality.

                  with most older machines they will have standard AC motors and they used standard motor mountings. with a lot of the new stuff it is a motor driver board, often that will be advertised as a "soft start feature" that can be ok until the motor fails and you realize there is no standard replacement in fact it may have a metric sized shaft or proprietary designed motor mount. the electronics are ok until they fail, their main purpose is to make it so the manufacturer spends less on copper windings and motor castings. who cares how "soft the start is" If boards and stuff fail we try to deal with it but I think there is something to owning a motor with a standard mounting so then you know you can find some way of swapping it out and it's less likely you are up against some proprietary part that could be discontinued because they change plans and part sources even during the builds. older ac motors were often run at a constant speed and there will be a variable speed pulley or something similar . The electronics eliminated the need for this mechanical speed control part and that cheapened manufacture. motors with electronic motor drivers are ok in use and im principle but the problem is there are too many brands and not enough standardization to assure parts availability. You can get caught with a 10 year old machine that is obsolete because no one makes the motor or the driver for it. sure electronics can be adapted, that maybe possible. when you get into larger equipment then you may also see more robust driver boards and such and use parts like "siemens " and not some unheard of and limited manufacture brand like "happy motor company" or similar. it has soft start and variable control speed via a knob, thats ok , next question who made the motor driver board then? If it's a great big industrial bandaw with a 5 HP motor then maybe it's not bad quality.. if the maker of the saw claims to make the board then I'd be somewhat careful. you can bet the saw maker doesn't make electronic boards they buy them , from who? maybe some offshore company that placed the best price on the factory's order fulfillment for 1000 of them.. or maybe from someone reputable like Siemens who will continue to support it? I saw bandsaw hardly used with a baldor motor but the problem was it was made in a limited number, special order , sure made by baldor and had a metric sized shaft. that made it impractical to repair baldor said they could make one but at minimum it woudl be 800.00 if it had a normal mounting flange and a standard sized shaft it would be $2-300 or in that ballpark.


                  I dont running like machines when they on wheels some mobile bases may have different designs. I built some that lift he saw off the ground on threaded spindles and they were ok. the wheels then only come into play when Im moving it. my saw at home I just put on a base with nylon pads so I can shift it along wiht the extended table in one unit. I usually just need to turn it. Its best if it is on a stable base however you do that. if the saw is on rubber wheels it wont be very solid, best if the weight is transferred to the ground without any cushion between. if it can roll around when you use it that's bad and that may also make it a bit tall and that doesn't help its center of gravity.

                  some shops that do a lot of sheet goods have big tables and long fences so they can handle sheet goods more easily. some have sliding tables too. your space may limit that size but one thing to think about when you do buy a saw is how far will the fence move away from the blade? If your saw is not big then you may have to cut stock down with a circular saw to make it easier to handle and that's ok if you arent; building cabinets all day long. you may not want a saw that is 8' long in your workshop if you dont need that.

                  thickness planers, the cheapo lunchbox planers like makita , dewalt or maybe ryobi may be ok , they are loud and often the blades are single or double use. fine for the home use intended. If you want to invest in more you can move towards about a 20" planer with knives you can sharpen and reuse and adjust. they will work better if you have the work for them, more adjustments usually better drive on the workpiece, more positive control. The SCM ones are really nice if you have the work for that level of machine.

                  a lot of the more modern planers and jointers will have carbide replaceable inserts they are ok but if you buy the machine first make sure of the size and price, some are not standard and can be pricey so see if they are proprietary.

                  the important thing here is what two cars did you choose to restore? ;-)

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                  • #24

                    Re: A new hobby on the horizon

                    I started with just a sliding miter saw and circular saw and was able to make quite a few things as well as retrim my house.

                    A track saw is a good substitute for a table saw at the beginning. Plan a project and buy only the tools you need. I never needed a belt sander for 8 years after starting woodworking. Random orbital sander was all I needed. I think my next tool was a router.

                    To post pictures click on the camera on the top left when you are posting and click upload.
                    Steve The Drill Sergeant
                    Check out MyShopNotes on YouTube.

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                    • #25

                      Re: A new hobby on the horizon

                      If you buy used stuff at market value you wont be sorry, not only will your dollar go further but you'll be more likely to get decent quality stuff.

                      If you buy a bunch of powerfist/ Crappy Tire / Fisher Price plastic Chinese stuff stuff what you have there is a pile of plastic garbage. ever watch a kid try to build something with fisher price tools, at some point you realize they are so useless its just an exercise in frustration, give the kid a real hammer he'll only hit his thumb so many times and then he'll actually be able to drive a nail in and pull it out. how dangerous is a hammer to a kid, yet we need to give them a plastic one that is no more than a completely useless representation of a hammer? I can see not giving him a powder actuated hilti gun but lets be reasonable you couldn't drive a nail with a plastic hammer so why would you expect a kid to do that? I can see it for the toddlers, thats different than a 10 year old though.

                      I'd try to look for ads and clubs and see if you can link up with someone who is at the point in their life where they are downsizing. Be patient there are a lot of boomers that fit that category and have been collecting decent tools for a lifetime. When they make the move from their 2 car garage to something like a pigeon coop they unfortunately do have to sell their tools. That's the time to invest. , not online on impulse.

                      I bet there are people from Ontario that fit the description above here in the forum. ( lol not the plastic fiher price hammers) maybe you should make a "wanted list" and post it under for sale/ wanted and see if you get some locals to respond. many have multiples. There are a lot of nice people that may be happy to contribute toward your hobby and at the same time pair down a bit.

                      my philosophy has always been the more tools , the more I can do but buy used and dont pay too much. If I am doing a project and really need something but even paint and screws or materials or whatever always look for used stuff first. I've saved so much and there are no tools I really need, If I need them right now for a project Ill buy them new if I have to but not before scouring for used.
                      but I dont buy ahead in speculation. I almost never have to buy bubble packs because I'll buy that bin of assorted screws at a garage sale for pennies on the dollar. If you want battery tools then sure by new but try to stick to one brand so the batteries fit and you dont need 3 chargers.

                      electric screwdrivers were once really popular . people bough the things, , they never had any power and were soon in the big red bin along with their 2 year old worn out batteries.. you can add to that list the electric weed whacker the electric lawnmower and so on.. we make so much garbage for the landfill it's a shame.

                      I wouldn't bother too much with used battery tools. get a new makita or dewalt or somethign common but for the hand tools they haven't improved any. give me an ancient old ball peen hammer over any brand new one and I'll be fine with that. Ill even prefer the old wooden handle to a plastic one. tin snips crow bars nail pullers and on and on, many were better than they are now. you can tell if the tin snips are all worn out. want a leather punch ? carpenters hammer, some hedge trimming tools? how about some bar clamps? some decent screwdrivers? scribing tools? my point is the final list will be big so if you buy it all individually it will add up. be patient and make good choices and don't buy a bunch of junk.


                      Last edited by stickman; 10-13-2021, 02:04 PM.

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                      • #26

                        Re: A new hobby on the horizon

                        Eric you said you were looking for a drill press. so rather than buying some offshore POS consider this one which I only had to hop over to the for sale ads in this forum to find.
                        Its a decent sturdy one that will outlive the online junk by many years. his price of $250 seems pretty decent to me and it even looks beautiful cosmetically. Now that could be a start in the right direction for you !

                        lets make note , it does not have a belt guard and I dont know if it ever did, you cn make one from wood or tin if you like. also the "on" switch is a light switch and you could add a stop button if you liked, or even a lockable switch. Personally Id be fine the way it is but if you wanted it safer that could be a feature you could add.

                        if you have children near it and want a positive locking device so they are unable to power it on then you could opt for a clamshell that covers the plug so you just unplug it and stick the "boot" on and lock it and then no one can power it on without removing it.

                        I have no interest in the sale, but the two of you could likely benefit by having a discussion because he is downsizing and you are "upsizing" so it sounds like the two of you could perhaps find other things that need to go from his place to yours.

                        https://forum.canadianwoodworking.co...press-for-sale
                        Last edited by stickman; 10-13-2021, 04:10 PM.

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