Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Process questions

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Process questions

    Wanted to throw out something here to see if it makes sense or not among the more experienced woodworkers.
    I purchased the Adirondack chair plans from LV as I want to make a couple for the lake. Now I expect that I will be making more than one or two at some point so I figured I would make templates of the parts using 1/4 hardboard. I glued the entire plan on a 4x4 sheet of board, then cut them out on the BS. My thinking on this was that I would have patterns that would last longer than paper alone, and that I could rough cut the parts out of cedar, then screw the hardboard templates on and trim on the router table with a flush cut bit with hopes of eliminating as much sanding as I can. (I hate sanding). For the most part the routered pieces are smooth except for some of the opposite grain sections

    Found two problems with this plan so far:

    1. It appears as though my BS blade might be dull as I seem to have had a bit of a rough finish on the hardboard. Enough so that the bearing would reproduce the surface ever so slightly. I then lighty sanded (ugh) that hardboard so that it would be smooth.
    Lesson learned - a flush cut bit will reproduce even the smallest ridges so get a new BS blade to see if that makes cuts smoother.

    2. while executing the router flush trim plan I encountered a slightly scary scenario that basically tore the half of the piece from the part I was holding. Granted, I was on the end grain portion however I am only taking 1/6 at most from the parts and I had done a few already, so this was a bit suprising.
    I am using the posts incorporated into the table to brace the work, and I am feeding the material correctly.

    Can I assume that the trim bit is just dull and subsequently scrap metal (not sure if they can be sharpened and still be used for flush cut being undersized to the bearing). It is cedar and I don't expect that this would happen with hardwood but it's a bit of a scary event when half of the part goes flying; but at least the finger count was positive.

    Am I complicating this more than I have to and maybe just cut them all out on the BS with a new blade, then sand? Does this mean I need another tool!

    Thoughts would be appreciated!

  • #2

    Re: Process questions

    Re: Process questions

    Im no huge producer of muskoka or adriondak chairs, but i've made about 50+ in my few years.
    I know exactly where your coming from with the flush trim idea and yeah it sounds like you have the process right. What I've learned in my experience is as follows.

    You will always have to sand off bandsaw marks no matter how new your blade, so cut your templates and parts with this in mind. When making templates from paper cut as close as possible and sand using spindle sander, edge sander and disc sander if available.

    I also went the flush trim idea with a few chairs but ended up deciding I like cutting the parts on the band as accurate as possible then sanding. I trace the templates with a easy to see pen and try to cut it out so I have a very fine pen mark left, then clean up the edges by sanding.

    I find the band saw rout generally less stressful and much safer. But if you want to go with this method use a flush trim bit with s sheer cut. This is a similar bit that I use when doing flush trimming. I found this bit in a set for around $80.

    Be safe and have fun, there's many methods to every end find what works for you.
    Canadian Woodworks - Custom wooden rocking chairs

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Process questions

      Re: Process questions

      Thanks shrlok, i can see how that bit would be a less aggressive cutter, especially on the end grains. So it seems to me that I can buy a bit for one purpose, or I buy a spindle combo sander for well over twice the price and use if for a bunch of things. The edge routing did seem as scary as any tool I have ever used but the lure is the nice finish it leaves on most of the parts.

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Process questions

        Re: Process questions

        I had the ridgid belt/spindle sander, which I used for many years and it was a big help, and it's a pretty cheap too, they seem to come up used on kijiji or here.
        Canadian Woodworks - Custom wooden rocking chairs

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Process questions

          Re: Process questions

          "Does this mean I need another tool! "

          yes you need another tool ;-)

          I have a 6 inch rigid random orbital sander. I love that it hooks up to my rigid vac and really does cure the dust issue. the paper for it is really crazy expensive though.
          others may chime in but to anser your question , yes you need more tools ! don't we all ?
          “The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” -Bertrand Russell

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Process questions

            Re: Process questions

            Originally posted by phil View Post
            "Does this mean I need another tool! "

            yes you need another tool ;-)

            I have a 6 inch rigid random orbital sander. I love that it hooks up to my rigid vac and really does cure the dust issue. the paper for it is really crazy expensive though.
            others may chime in but to anser your question , yes you need more tools ! don't we all ?
            Thanks Phil, I don't really need excuses to buy new tools, but they help!!! I have a Dewalt orbital palm sander but it's drawback is the dust as the darn cup attachment is near useless. I am looking at a Rigid spindle/belt oscillating combo and it seems to have a lot of good reviews but I can get a King KC-760l for less than a hundred bucks more and it seems like a lot more sander.
            Last edited by johansmyth; 07-12-2012, 11:02 AM.

            Comment


            • #7

              Re: Process questions

              Re: Process questions

              I got a set of plans for Norm Abrams Ad. Chair from a member here. I expanded it out from the scale and put each piece on 1/2 inch MDF as a template. I did a lot of sanding to get all the bumps and crevices out. I've made 10 chairs out of white cedar so far for friends. I use the template to mark the piece. Then band saw it an 1/8 inch oversize and finish it off on router table. No sanding required. It sure simplifies the process.
              Discussion is the mother or father of ideas.
              Discord is the bastard son of discussion.


              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Process questions

                Re: Process questions

                I don't think your trim bit is necessarily dull or scrap. If you use a flush trim bit uphill or against the grain it will be grabby and sometimes split the wood along the grain. You always want to try and go downhill if possible.
                Jamie www.turneddesignsbyjamie.etsy.com

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Process questions

                  Re: Process questions

                  Originally posted by jaywood1207 View Post
                  I don't think your trim bit is necessarily dull or scrap. If you use a flush trim bit uphill or against the grain it will be grabby and sometimes split the wood along the grain. You always want to try and go downhill if possible.
                  I put my new router in the table, the Triton, and a new bit and it was a bit better but still chipped out in a couple of places. I assume that by uphill you mean the direction of the feed?

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Process questions

                    Re: Process questions

                    Originally posted by johansmyth View Post
                    I put my new router in the table, the Triton, and a new bit and it was a bit better but still chipped out in a couple of places. I assume that by uphill you mean the direction of the feed?
                    In the picture I have attached the black line indicates the shape of your board, the blue lines show the grain, the blue circle is your router bit, and the red arrows indicate the rotation of your router bit. I have made the assumption with this that you have a table mounted router with a flush trim bit with the bearing on the bottom of the bit which means in my drawing you need the pattern on the top of your board you are routing. If you look at the bit that says OK you are peeling off the wood with the grain which I was referring to as downhill. The bit shown that is Bad is peeling off wood against the grain (uphill) which is more likely to grab and rip your wood right down the grain lines if you have straight grain wood. Hopefully that makes sense.Router.jpg
                    Jamie www.turneddesignsbyjamie.etsy.com

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Process questions

                      Re: Process questions

                      Originally posted by jaywood1207 View Post
                      In the picture I have attached the black line indicates the shape of your board, the blue lines show the grain, the blue circle is your router bit, and the red arrows indicate the rotation of your router bit. I have made the assumption with this that you have a table mounted router with a flush trim bit with the bearing on the bottom of the bit which means in my drawing you need the pattern on the top of your board you are routing. If you look at the bit that says OK you are peeling off the wood with the grain which I was referring to as downhill. The bit shown that is Bad is peeling off wood against the grain (uphill) which is more likely to grab and rip your wood right down the grain lines if you have straight grain wood. Hopefully that makes sense.[ATTACH=CONFIG]50971[/ATTACH]
                      That makes sense, and I expect that is exactly what's happening but at the risk of sounding like a moron, how do I trim the uphill sides? I have the pattern screwed to one side and it's either down for the bottom bearing bit, or up for the second one that has the bearing on top. I tried it because it was 1/2" and thinking it was sharper.

                      Comment


                      • #12

                        Re: Process questions

                        Re: Process questions

                        Originally posted by johansmyth View Post
                        That makes sense, and I expect that is exactly what's happening but at the risk of sounding like a moron, how do I trim the uphill sides? I have the pattern screwed to one side and it's either down for the bottom bearing bit, or up for the second one that has the bearing on top. I tried it because it was 1/2" and thinking it was sharper.
                        I am by no means an expert and there may be other ideas out there. My suggestion which becomes a PITA is to put a flush trim bit with the bearing on the bottom of the bit and then flip your piece over to do (in my diagram) from the point down the right side. This would cut downhill but it means a bit change part way through. You might be better off to go with the suggestions above and cut with the bandsaw then sand smooth.
                        Jamie www.turneddesignsbyjamie.etsy.com

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: Process questions

                          Re: Process questions

                          A plane and spokeshave will eliminate sanding and routing.

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: Process questions

                            Re: Process questions

                            Originally posted by dwoody View Post
                            A plane and spokeshave will eliminate sanding and routing.
                            True, but you will still need to pay attention to grain direction.
                            Mike @ Buck Lake

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: Process questions

                              Re: Process questions

                              ive made dozens of the LV chairs and have a full set of templates and tapering jigs for all the pieces.

                              most of the templates are 5/8 material, just a mixture of particleboard and plywood

                              i just screw the template to the backside of the workpiece, bandsaw really close(1/8 or so) then trim. screwing to the back avoids screw holes where i dont want them. so im careful to cut left and rights for pieces like the arms and legs

                              i used the dual bearing pattern cutting bit from LV, either using the lower bearing or upperbearing(in a router table) with a extra layer of plywood on the table when using the upper bearing to allow the pattern to "reach" the upper bearing. so no router height adjustments are needed.

                              my next sets will be cut out on my homecraft shaper with a byrd head, same steps

                              so basically route whats downhill using the lower bearing, add my extra layer of ply to my table to reach the upper bearing, turn the workpiece/template over and finish the routing, very quick, very little sanding required

                              i use 5/4 cedar for all the parts except the seat and back slats, there i use cedar fence boards. the 5/4 stuff is a hair over 1 inch and the fence boards are around 5/8. i joint and plane the material first, not really necessary but does make a nicer finished product. two chairs require 6 8ft deck boards(5/4 by 6) and 8 6ft fench boards

                              the arms require an extra 1 1/2 or so added to an edge for the full width if using deck boards

                              i made a couple of changes to the plans that simplify assembly, the biggie is extending the seat support pieces to meet the back support, if you look at the plan, you'll see a space between those two pieces where they attach to the long leg part, i filled that gap with a longer seat support(about 7/8 longer and a matching angle cut)
                              Last edited by stevem; 07-13-2012, 05:25 AM.
                              my shop is a beaver lodge
                              steve, sarnia, ont

                              sigpic

                              1940's Beaver Jointer

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X