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Jigsaw Puzzles via Scroll Saw

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  • Jigsaw Puzzles via Scroll Saw

    Did a search here, and was surprised to not find any discussions about creating jigsaw puzzles on the scroll saw.

    Is anyone here doing this?

    I am going to give it a try in the near future, and was wondering about a few things.

    The glue used to hold the photo to the backing. Is there a "best" glue for this? Will different types of glue change the photo over time, through chemical interaction or bleeding through?

    All references I have found elsewhere use wood to back the photos. Some 1/4" baltic birch plywood, some up to 1" pine, many other variations depending on what people had kicking around their shop. Would hardboard work? Specifically, I am thinking of something that goes to very young kids who will likely destroy the puzzle over time, so a less expensive backing that will NOT generate splinters would be better.

    Can one cut two at a time? I am thinking of two boards with photos glued, then put face to face with something between the photos, maybe just a sheet of white paper. Any reason this would not work?

    Does anyone put anything onto the photo to protect its surface? Is there a spray finish that is photo-safe?

    Thanks!
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  • #2

    Re: Jigsaw Puzzles via Scroll Saw

    oh I missed this one... My wife does jigsaw puzzles. Uses calendar images or christmas cars and 3M 777's them to 1/4" BB ply. She uses the puzzle blades from Mikes work shop in the USA. Once in a while if the paper is a poor quality or too thick, then after cutting the pieces, she may need to fix up some edges where the paper lifted with a bit of white glue.

    She does not cover the finished piece with anything and has not had anyone come back to complain about the puzzles in the past 5-6 years.

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    • #3

      Re: Jigsaw Puzzles via Scroll Saw

      Lloyd - thanks!

      1/4" BB? I might have tried 1/8". Good to know.

      Are there any issues with splinters or slivers? That is why I asked about using hardboard instead of plywood.

      Originally posted by Lloyd in Mississauga View Post
      She does not cover the finished piece with anything and has not had anyone come back to complain about the puzzles in the past 5-6 years.
      I am thinking of using photographs, which may not be the same as she is using. Photos may benefit from an extra layer of protection, but then again, I am still thinking of the old photographic processes, not an image printed with an inkjet printer.

      Does she use a pattern? If so, how does she put the pattern over the image?

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      • #4

        Re: Jigsaw Puzzles via Scroll Saw

        I have done a few awhile ago. Check out Steve Goods video at https://youtu.be/N13GOTLvk9A.

        I bought the pattern book from Steve but there patterns available on the web too if you search. Scroll down http://fssp-arpop.blogspot.ca/search...0Saw%20Puzzles

        I use the Flying Dutchman puzzle bladed too.
        Don McFarland
        ​Member - Durham Woodworking Club
        http://www.durhamwoodworkingclub.com/

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        • #5

          Re: Jigsaw Puzzles via Scroll Saw

          There is no pattern, it would be way too awkward to try and place then cut. It is all free hand. There is no issue with splinters as the blades are very fine and leave a super clean edge. You will find the better the BB ply, the better the project. There is some "cheap" BB that actually has small voids in the interior layers. If you were using it for larger projects these likely would not be an issue, but on the scale of puzzle pieces, they can be a real pain in the butt.

          You may find that old photo's are too thick and want to separate over time. She has only used printed images, either calendars or laser from Staples of photo's.

          If you get into it, then they have their own "language" for the shape of the puzzle pieces and you can add additional things like figurals into the puzzle as hidden pieces that you really only see as you are looking at the raw pieces. Once they are in the puzzle, you do not see them as easily.

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          • #6

            Re: Jigsaw Puzzles via Scroll Saw

            Originally posted by Don in Brooklin On View Post
            I have done a few awhile ago. Check out Steve Goods video at https://youtu.be/N13GOTLvk9A.
            Don - I had viewed Steve Good's video. He uses a sacrificial piece of 1/8" BB for the puzzle design.

            One of my questions has been - is there any reason a piece of hardboard would not work instead of the 1/8" BB? A lot cheaper, and somewhat easier on the blades, as far as I know.


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            • #7

              Re: Jigsaw Puzzles via Scroll Saw

              Originally posted by Lloyd in Mississauga View Post
              There is no pattern, it would be way too awkward to try and place then cut. It is all free hand.
              Wow! That is beyond what I would attempt, if I wanted consistent sizing of the pieces. If you do a lot, that may make sense, but for a beginner the use of a pattern is a well appreciated crutch.

              Originally posted by Lloyd in Mississauga View Post
              There is no issue with splinters as the blades are very fine and leave a super clean edge.
              That is good to know.

              Originally posted by Lloyd in Mississauga View Post
              You may find that old photo's are too thick and want to separate over time. She has only used printed images, either calendars or laser from Staples of photo's.
              My message was not clear - I am printing the photos on an inkjet photo printer.

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              • #8

                Re: Jigsaw Puzzles via Scroll Saw

                The size of the pieces free hand is much easier than you think. the big thing is to remember to swing the piece to cut the tabs so that they would interlock rather than just a wave or curve. I am sure if you wanted to hand draw a set of interlocking objects and then lay them over the picture you could cut them out, but how do you hold the edges down as you go? Try a sample piece of ply to cut out a series of sample pieces without a pattern and you will catch on pretty quick.

                The inkjet ink will fade pretty quickly I think. Staples or Walmart laser prints if you need to are pretty cheap and will last better if you do not have =access to a laser printer.

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