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  • Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

    I turned on my planer today and a stream of smoke poured from the breaker. A bit of a back story, the breaker tripped yesterday and I was sick of dealing with it so I left it. Today after the smoking incident I noticed that the breaker doesnt move. Anyone have any idea how much it would be to get the breaker replaced by an authorized Dewalt repairman? I found the breaker online for 20 bucks.

    Anyone had that happen before?
    I immediately turned the planer off by the way.

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  • #2

    Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

    Welcome to the forum. I would bypass the breaker to see if there are problems with the motor or switch before spending any money on it, but I do a lot of repairs on all kinds of things where as you evidently do not. A service center may well have a diagnostic charge, you can not blame them for that. Just food for thought.
    Rob

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    • #3

      Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

      Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
      Welcome to the forum. I would bypass the breaker to see if there are problems with the motor or switch before spending any money on it, but I do a lot of repairs on all kinds of things where as you evidently do not. A service center may well have a diagnostic charge, you can not blame them for that. Just food for thought.
      Rob
      I'm not sure what to look for if I bypassed the breaker. The planer turns on, it just had a ton of smoke billowing out from the breaker. That and it's my father-in-law's planer so I wouldn't want to risk burning the motor out hence why I'm good with paying for it to be fixed. If it was mine I'd rip it apart and replace the breaker myself.

      Lol the last thing I need is my FIL pissed at me for screwing up his planer.


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      • #4

        Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

        Good chance the breaker is full of wood dust, open it and blast it clean with compressed air, then see if that did help, you can go on from there.

        Maybe a good idea to call FIL and tell him about it, he might have had this happen before, best to let him know anyway IMO.

        Have fun and take care
        Leo Van Der Loo

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        • #5

          Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

          Originally posted by Leo Van Der Loo View Post
          Good chance the breaker is full of wood dust, open it and blast it clean with compressed air, then see if that did help, you can go on from there.

          Maybe a good idea to call FIL and tell him about it, he might have had this happen before, best to let him know anyway IMO.
          Absolutely call FIL first! A dirty breaker would not trip I would have thought. Bypassing it and having the machine appear fine while closely monitored would diagnose the problem as the breaker, a cheap simple fix.

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          • #6

            Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

            Originally posted by iamtooler View Post

            Absolutely call FIL first! A dirty breaker would not trip I would have thought. Bypassing it and having the machine appear fine while closely monitored would diagnose the problem as the breaker, a cheap simple fix.
            How would I bypass the breaker if I was going to?

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            • #7

              Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

              A clip lead on the wire in to the wire out.

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              • #8

                Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

                Apparently it is a fairly common issue with the 735 if that's what you have.
                "Do it Right!"

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

                  Originally posted by iamtooler View Post

                  Absolutely call FIL first! A dirty breaker would not trip I would have thought. Bypassing it and having the machine appear fine while closely monitored would diagnose the problem as the breaker, a cheap simple fix.
                  You are probably right, but I read that the smoke came out and he immediately turned it off, but yes he had it trip the day before, oh well, 20 bucks and he has a new one.

                  Have fun and take care
                  Leo Van Der Loo

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

                    Originally posted by Leo Van Der Loo View Post

                    You are probably right, but I read that the smoke came out and he immediately turned it off, but yes he had it trip the day before, oh well, 20 bucks and he has a new one.
                    I opened it up and there was a bit of sawdust in there. Couldn't see anything burnt. FIL said order a new circuit breaker and replace myself. Not a biggie.

                    And Rusty it's a DW733. New breaker should be here Wednseday.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

                      Got the new breaker yesterday. Installed in about 5 minutes and it works like a charm.

                      The old breaker had some soot on the side. Definite signs that it blew. Stunk too.

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                      • #12

                        Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

                        All's well that ends well!
                        Good for you.

                        Tim

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                        • #13

                          Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

                          if you want you can add a start stop box with an overload and contactor. a lot of them are adjustable so you can set the number of amps. you can use a clamp on ammeter to check the load upon startup. Motors will draw more amps briefly during startup. That's normal and expected. some of the starters have an overload and with some there is a contactor and a separate overload. if you speak to an electrician he will talk about the FLA or full load amps and probably a ratio but I wont quote that stuff. the FLA may be stated on the tag.

                          a proper separate overload is designed to allow some momentary higher current but if it is sustained like if the motor has locked mechanically, then it blows the overload. the contactor may also allow things such as remote stop buttons to be added, or a lockout. this is often added for additional protection. If there were no fuse or overload and if you got the motor locked ten the windings would probably act as your fuse and end the machines' life unless your house breaker blew instead which is likely.

                          I'd still probably replace the factory part to be sure it can blow at it's designed rating.

                          breakers can stick. fuses normally don't stick because they don't have much happening mechanically and some fuses are designed to allow some initial current before they blow as well as the overloads designed for motors. you may see reference to slow blow fuses.

                          bypassing the breaker as a solution is dicey but I think the point there was why spend money if the windings are burned and if that is the CAUSE of why the breaker went south , you might want to find out before dropping money by doing a careful controlled experiment. I agree with that.

                          turn it manually if you can see if the bearings seem ok and make sure you dont have a stuck wood chip or some odd thing. maybe a knot trapped near the blades.

                          the breaker probably saved the motor and perhaps it did its job but some of this offshore stuff is just weak, especially electrical parts. It probably should have been able to reset but it's also probably made very cheaply.

                          I'd check the brushes if it has them, but make sure it is unplugged when you do.

                          If you wanted to you could put an appropriate sized breaker or fuse between those clip leads just so you don't have a "catastrophic failure"

                          If the machine is put together as normal and instead of plugging it in , if you put an ammeter across the two prongs of the plug you should see an open circuit. When the trigger is pulled it should then show the resistance through the motor and not a dead short. If you happened to be near a similar machine you might try that one to know what to expect. I would think it would be a number of ohms, not open line (OL) and not 0 ohms. I think you should see some sort of resistance, I can't say for certain how much. but that's a very easy check .

                          I just did that on a little bandsaw to see and I got low numbers of resistance on the motor and the fluid pump when turned on and unplugged, with my meter across the prongs. so as a comparison , the little pump reads 7 amps , the AC motor reads between 1 and 2 amps. If I turn both on I read 1 amp. that's combining the resistance of the two. two resistances in parallel will amount to a lower resistance than either separately.

                          If it read zero I'd question why I saw no resistance and that could mean a short.

                          but what you see there will depend on the specifics. If it's dead shorted you may then choose not to plug it in until you know why. I'd expect a low number like maybe 2 or 7 ohms, or something other than 0. zero means is no resistance and that may mean a dead short,but if the motor had big windings maybe the resistance could seem like a low number and that could mislead you into thinking it was shorted when really it was just low resistance. Now some meters may be more accurate, Im using a Fluke but not a really high end one.

                          that test is simple though , put your meter between the prongs then turn the machine on and that's without anything plugged in. put the meter on ohms and see what you get. with a blown fuse or breaker you should see open line since it isn't a complete circuit.

                          you can do the same check on other 120 V machines that happen to be nearby to see what you read. if it had protection like a motor starter it wouldn't be able to close the circuit since the coil needs power to make the contacts. so then this would be an invalid test.

                          If the windings or some wires were crossed up that you could not see then you may see evidence that it is shorted and that would then cause you to wonder why and then be cautious about power up. but having said that every short is not 0 ohms because things can be shorted but maybe there is resistance in the short like if it were two dirty wires kind of touching but not making good contact, your meter may see that as some resistance until power is applied and make it spark and short more positively under power conditions.

                          hopefully that made some sense and didn't just confuse things. If it did not make sense ask why and if I'm out to lunch on any of this, yes you can call me on it. We can discuss why that is without it being offensive or difficult.

                          you wont have the overload and you probably dont need one but it may apply in some circumstances. If it's 3 phase then I'd involve a real electrician which I am not , as there are more complexities.

                          you could use that simple test for example to determining of an old vintage lamp that was given to you with no history was shorted before you plugged it in and in that case you'd be checking to see that you had some resistance through the light bulb instead of a dead short when it was switched on. It would not tell you about if the insulation was any good but it might tell you that lamp is shorted, then you could find out why it's shorted before you connect it. That's preferable to causing your house breaker to pop. being safe and thorough you may also want to examine the wiring visually before making the assumption that is is safe to use.


                          now I wrote all that and then realized you got your machien working and all is well so that's good ;-) I'll leave it there anyway.










                          Last edited by stickman; 04-14-2021, 05:44 PM.

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                          • #14

                            Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

                            Originally posted by stickman View Post
                            if you want you can add a start stop box with an overload and contactor. a lot of them are adjustable so you can set the number of amps. you can use a clamp on ammeter to check the load upon startup. Motors will draw more amps briefly during startup. That's normal and expected. some of the starters have an overload and with some there is a contactor and a separate overload. if you speak to an electrician he will talk about the FLA or full load amps and probably a ratio but I wont quote that stuff.

                            a proper separate overload is designed to allow some momentary higher current but if it is sustained like if the motor has locked mechanically, then it blows the overload. the contactor may also allow things such as remote stop buttons to be added, or a lockout. this is often added for additional protection. If there were no fuse or overload and if you got the motor locked ten the windings would probably act as your fuse and end the machines' life unless your house breaker blew instead which is likely.

                            I'd still probably replace the factory part to be sure it can blow at it's designed rating.

                            breakers can stick. fuses normally don't stick because they don't have much happening mechanically and some fuses are designed to allow some initial current before they blow as well as the overloads designed for motors.

                            bypassing the breaker as a solution is dicey but I think the point there was why spend money if the windings are burned and if that is the CAUSE of why the breaker went south , you might want to find out before dropping money by doing a careful controlled experiment. I agree with that.

                            turn it manually if you can see if the bearings seem ok and make sure you dont have a stuck wood chip or some odd thing.

                            the breaker probably saved the motor and perhaps it did its job but some of this offshore stuff is just weak, especially electrical parts. It probably should have been able to reset but it's also probably made very cheaply.

                            I'd check the brushes if it has them, but make sure it is unplugged when you do.

                            If you wanted to you could put an appropriate sized breaker or fuse between those clip leads just so you don't have a "catastrophic failure"

                            If the machine is put together as normal and instead of plugging it in , if you put an ammeter across the two prongs of the plug you should see an open circuit. When the trigger is pulled it should then show the resistance through the motor and not a dead short. If you happened to be near a similar machine you might try that one to know what to expect. I would think it would be a number of ohms, not open line (OL) and not 0 ohms. I think you should see some sort of resistance, I can't say for certain how much. but that's a very easy check .







                            Old thread, this thread is from September 2019

                            Have fun and take care
                            Leo Van Der Loo

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: Dewalt DE733 breaker smoking

                              time flies when you are having fun ;-)

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