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Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

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  • Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

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    Here's my most recent project, a quilted maple platter featuring a pair of crossing inlays (wenge and maple) and an airbrushed rim. Approximately 11 3/4" across X 1" deep.

    The following photos show a bit of the airbrushing steps. For more about the airbrush I used in this project, see my post for more information about it.

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    Spraying the base colour (semi-gloss black)

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    Then, the first colour (iridescent turquoise) is sprayed on, followed by the final colour (iridescent red)


    Attached Files
    Beaverfever1988, woodguy7 and 4 others like this.
    All the best,

    Marty

    Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

    Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)
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  • #2

    Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

    What I wonder is how you get those inlays in so nicely.

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

      Verrrry nice Marty.

      Noel
      "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
      'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
      "
      John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

        The process was outlined in a Fine Woodworking magazine article written a few years ago by a young Canadian woodworking who was under-studying Michael Fortune at the time. Its general process is to first decide how wide the inlay will be, then select a router bit of that width. You make a template of whatever shape you wish the inlay to follow (in my case with this piece it was a bit of an S), then insert your guide bushing into your router base to follow the shape, and route only about 1/3 of the way through the board. Then you saw through the middle of the routed slot with your bandsaw or jigsaw before using a template router bit to cleanup the sawn edges. This all then gives you a board with a 1/4" (or whatever sides slot you'd made in the board), ready to accept an inlay of that width. In my case, I used three pieces, each a bit thicker than the board (roughly 1"): one of maple for the inside thicker strip and two thinner strips of wenge for the outsides. The important thing is for the total width of those strips to be the thickness of the routed slot. If they aren't the grain of the original board won't line up properly. After glueing the three strips into place between the two parts of the routed board, allow them to cure, then plane the strips level with the top and back side of your board.

        You then repeat the same process, using either the same template or another one that complements the first. You can even make the second, overlapping inlay of a different width, and use different woods for the inlay. That's where your imagination really comes into play!

        Hope that explains it well enough, Art.
        All the best,

        Marty

        Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

        Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

          Thanks, Noel!

          Originally posted by beachburl View Post
          Verrrry nice Marty.

          Noel
          All the best,

          Marty

          Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

          Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

            Another nice one!
            Egon
            from
            The South Shore, Nova Scotia

            Comment

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            • #7

              Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

              Thanks, Egon.

              Originally posted by Egon View Post
              Another nice one!
              All the best,

              Marty

              Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

              Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

                great work Marty, as usual

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

                  I was inspired by Marty's platter and thought I would give it a try (without the airbrushing which is a whole other slippery slope that I'm trying not fall down). I really like the effect of the laminated ribbons. If I were to do it again, I would use a blank that at least 1.5" thick. Starting out at 1" x 14", its hard to create anything other than a pizza pan. My platter is hard maple with ribbons of cherry, walnut, wenge, and maple veneer.
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                  Thanks for posting the original Marty!

                  Adam

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                  • #10

                    Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

                    As Marty's: verrry nice.
                    But I'm not tempted to try.

                    Noel
                    "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
                    'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
                    "
                    John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

                      Good for you in trying this inlaying method, Adam! Yours looks lovely!!
                      Last edited by MartyFromKingston; 12-02-2019, 01:08 AM.
                      All the best,

                      Marty

                      Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

                      Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)

                      Comment

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                      • #12

                        Re: Platter - Turned then Airbrushed

                        The inlay method is neat & consice.
                        Egon
                        from
                        The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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