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First real turning

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  • First real turning

    I finally got around to making something on the new (to me) lathe. Its just regular old maple. It's about 5 1/2" wide and 4" high. Going to sand the snot out of it and then 6 or 7 coats of tung oil. I can see flaws but hey, it's a learning process.
    woodguy7 and marvintpa like this.
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  • #2

    Re: First real turning

    Nice turning Chris.
    Jacques

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    • #3

      Re: First real turning

      Originally posted by Jacques Leclerc View Post
      Nice turning Chris.
      Jacques
      Thank you sir. I know it's pretty basic but at this point I am relearning the "feel" of the chisels, the properties of the lathe itself, the nature of the various species of wood, etc. All in all I thought it wasn't half bad given that it's a 65 year old lathe!

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      • #4

        Re: First real turning

        Please don't sir me, lol. I am just as old as your lathe 65 yrs old. lol.. and you should have seen the first bowl I turned , it was terrible and I think yours is pretty good for your first .
        Jacques
        Chris_in_Canada likes this.

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        • #5

          Re: First real turning

          Originally posted by Jacques Leclerc View Post
          Please don't sir me, lol. I am just as old as your lathe 65 yrs old. lol.. and you should have seen the first bowl I turned , it was terrible and I think yours is pretty good for your first .
          Jacques
          I'm only a couple years behind you myself.

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          • #6

            Re: First real turning

            Not knowing what tool you were using, a sheer scrape will save you a ton of sanding, and result in a better surface you can sand out a few places where needed. Too much sanding will leave a 'wavy' surface on the grain figure.

            Noel
            "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
            'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
            "
            John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

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            • #7

              Re: First real turning

              Originally posted by beachburl View Post
              Not knowing what tool you were using, a sheer scrape will save you a ton of sanding, and result in a better surface you can sand out a few places where needed. Too much sanding will leave a 'wavy' surface on the grain figure.

              Noel
              For the inside I used the bowl gouge to remove 99% of the material. Then the diamond parting tool to straighten the inside side. Used the 1" skew to even up the inside bottom. Used the round nose to shape the outside and again the 1" skew to straighten it. There is a lot of sanding I'll need to do. I've only got 8 chisels at this point and they aren't overly good ones either. I wanted to learn to "handle" them properly before investing in really good ones. But I did invest in the best grinder/wheels to keep them sharp.

              Are you saying that a square nosed scraper would be a worthwhile investment?

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              • #8

                Re: First real turning

                Some people cannot live without a scraper, and others never use them.
                Check out Lyle Jamieson's use of a bowl gouge to sheer scrape, if you want to see an expert.
                It will save most of your time sanding.
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDIvtr7StuA

                Noel
                "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
                'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
                "
                John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: First real turning

                  Originally posted by beachburl View Post
                  Some people cannot live without a scraper, and others never use them.
                  Check out Lyle Jamieson's use of a bowl gouge to sheer scrape, if you want to see an expert.
                  It will save most of your time sanding.
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDIvtr7StuA

                  Noel
                  Interesting. thanks for the tip. I'll look into it further. I'm for anything that can save sanding time!

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                  • #10

                    Re: First real turning

                    As already mentioned sanding is not the way to become proficient. It is all about the presentation of the gouge etc. However if you are using a skew chisel bowl turning you may well have a serious kick . Skews are generally used for rolling beads ,planing cuts etc in spindle work. if you are using it like a scraper it does not have the meat and you may well have a nasty dig that will both surprise and rattle your confidence.

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                    • #11

                      Re: First real turning

                      Originally posted by jay View Post
                      As already mentioned sanding is not the way to become proficient. It is all about the presentation of the gouge etc. However if you are using a skew chisel bowl turning you may well have a serious kick . Skews are generally used for rolling beads ,planing cuts etc in spindle work. if you are using it like a scraper it does not have the meat and you may well have a nasty dig that will both surprise and rattle your confidence.
                      I have no doubt you're right. Therefore to be clear, is a square (as opposed to a skewed) scraper the correct chisel to be using to reduce sanding?

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                      • #12

                        Re: First real turning

                        Based on what I see in your pictures, you have some serious end-grain tear-out and trying to sand that out won't be easy. I have used a skew as a negative-rake scraper but only on spindle work; I would never go near a bowl with it. I also wouldn't try to use a parting tool either unless it was to do what it was intended for, ie, parting.

                        Shear-scraping is one of the best cutting methods for dealing tear-out and I strongly second beachburl's suggestion. Also, shear-scraping with a gouge allows you to follow curves which generally are highly-desirable in bowl walls. I do not dismiss the use of regular scrapers for bowl turning as some turners do. A scraper is another one of the tools in your kit that can be a life-saver at some time but shear-scraping with a gouge is generally the far better way to scrape.

                        billh

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                        • #13

                          Re: First real turning

                          Originally posted by Chris_in_Canada View Post

                          I have no doubt you're right. Therefore to be clear, is a square (as opposed to a skewed) scraper the correct chisel to be using to reduce sanding?
                          A square-ended scraper is commonly used in making boxes where a sharp corner is desired where the wall and the bottom meet. Regular scrapers are not the best tools for reducing sanding (see previous comments on shear-scraping). They don't shear and have a tendency to grab the ends of the wood fibres on the end-grain portions of the wall and pull them out/break them off which makes for the rough surface requiring lots of sanding. End-grain is much harder to sand than side-grain and doing a lot of sanding often results in the wall being thinner in the side-grain region because it sanded easier. If the wood is slightly punky or showing spalting it is even harder to get a smooth surface.

                          I don't want to give the impression there is never any place in turning for a scraper; it is just that it often isn't the best tool although it may look like the easiest tool to use. I once turned a complete cherry bowl using only a round-nose scraper to prove a point but it certainly wasn't the ideal way of doing it.

                          billh
                          Last edited by billh; 03-15-2019, 09:17 AM.

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