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  • New Project

    Hopefully it's clear it's a vase lol. It started from a large branch that fell in the yard last fall from a Maple tree. I feel I need to play with various shapes and chisels. Since I don't have a chuck for the tail stock, I simply used a 12" long 1-1/4" spade bit on a hand drill to create the bore. I went nice and slow because I recognized it's probably not the safest thing to do. I don't have the correct chisel to widen it inside so I'm going to leave it as is. If I were doing it again (which I will as I have about 6 more feet of branch, I'd do the top differently. Any comments?
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    Chimera, nnieman and 2 others like this.
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  • #2

    Re: New Project

    Originally posted by Chris_in_Canada

    I've reposted the thread but now I can't see where to delete this one. Maybe I can't?
    Go to the bottom right and hit Edit and then Delete when the post comes up. Thanks -- that's much easier to see the pics.

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: New Project

      not letting me delete the op.

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: New Project

        Originally posted by Chris_in_Canada View Post
        not letting me delete the op.
        That's OK -- it might be too late. The Mods will look after it.

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: New Project

          Sorry everyone. I sorta messed this up. I'll make sure I post images properly in the future.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: New Project

            Nice try at a difficult project to start, Chris.
            I hope you are seriously considering joining the Thames Valley Woodturners Guild. (They met last night, and will meet again April 11).
            They will have more answers than you have questions, and someone(s) will guide you through turning.
            I can see that you have more 'sawdust' than shavings, which is a common start point for many turners.
            Good luck. There is still time to escape the slippery slope...
            http://www.thamesvalleywoodturners.com/

            Noel
            "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
            'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
            "
            John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

            Comment

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            • #7

              Re: New Project

              Originally posted by beachburl View Post
              Nice try at a difficult project to start, Chris.
              I hope you are seriously considering joining the Thames Valley Woodturners Guild. (They met last night, and will meet again April 11).
              They will have more answers than you have questions, and someone(s) will guide you through turning.
              I can see that you have more 'sawdust' than shavings, which is a common start point for many turners.
              Good luck. There is still time to escape the slippery slope...
              http://www.thamesvalleywoodturners.com/

              Noel
              The dust was because I'd sanded it rigorously. I used 36 - 80 - 120 - 220 - 360. There's no doubt I need to refine my technique and once life slows down a bit in retirement, I absolutely will join the guild. But as things are now, I work 40 - 50 hours a week and am a competitive skeet and target shooter so there's not a lot of spare time. When I retire my options will open up. That said, thank you for the encouragement!! The outside wasn't that hard but the inside was a bit nerve wracking to be sure.
              Last edited by Chris_in_Canada; 03-15-2019, 03:39 PM. Reason: adding a comment

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: New Project

                I visit fairly regularly do not often chime in here but since you asked for comments, I will offer a couple. It is never to early in your turning journey to make an effort to improve form. If anything that could improve this widely visited forum which has been active for a long time, is more attention to good critique.

                The lower part of the vase is a very good start. The upper "rim" is way too large and makes the piece top heavy. If you remove the chuck with piece still in it and stand up, you can get a better appreciation rather than looking horizontally. If you look at the third photo from the left - remove everything to the top of that abrupt transition and round the top into the mouth of the vase and a concave form following the top profile in the under portion of what now becomes the lip.

                It is quite a nice piece of spalted maple, a bit deep for an early hollowing project and pretty narrow. The size could suit a large weed pot configuration where you just drill say a 1/2" or 5/8" hole rather than hollowing and then flaring out the top. Gives a convenient way to reverse mount and finish off the bottom too by just turning a short dowel to put the top on and supporting with tailstock removing all but a small nib and then slicing the nib off and sanding. I have some 36 grit paper I think I was using to remove tile grout after ripping up ceramic tile on a concrete floor, but have never considered using on any lathe work. Will admit to 60 or 80 once in a while for severe tearout. If you are hand sanding, I would suggest picking up a 2" velcro sanding mandrel and buying or making some disks or squares to attach and mounting in a high speed drill. Lathe speed low and drill speed high. When I joined the Golden Horseshoe Guild almost 20 years ago (having had a not too often used lathe for about 30 years after earlier high school experiences) one of the most profound discoveries was power sanding.

                I was recently working with someone on bowl form and of several "bowl" books in my library, Richard Raffan's The Art of Turned Bowls, published in 2008 was the best with an excellent section on form. What he had to say for bowls easily translates to vases. Cindy Droza and Keith Tompkins have pretty good information on their sites about form as well. Both work with triangles that define the outer shape. With some of the remaining wood, maybe try something about six inches in total length. A small piece of 3/16" High Speed Steel (Busy Bee) in a 1/4" hole and secured with CA glue in a 1/2" cold rolled steel bar (Metal Supermarket, Home Depot, Princess Auto etc.) will make a first hollowing tool and a good opportunity to practice spindle work and make a handle. Looks at David Ellsworth's site or just Google for his hollowing tools. Have a look at Tools and Jigs at www.picturetrail.com/mikebrazeau

                It is a good start and I echo Noel's comment about visiting the Thames Valley guild and hopefully joining. There is no better way than being able to work with someone as a mentor and you will be in a room with literally probably a couple of hundred years of good experience to draw on.
                Last edited by Mike Brazeau; 03-23-2019, 08:08 PM.
                Mike
                www.picturetrail.com/mikebrazeau

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: New Project

                  Originally posted by Mike Brazeau View Post
                  I visit fairly regularly do not often chime in here but since you asked for comments, I will offer a couple. It is never to early in your turning journey to make an effort to improve form. If anything that could improve this widely visited forum which has been active for a long time, is more attention to good critique.

                  The lower part of the vase is a very good start. The upper "rim" is way too large and makes the piece top heavy. If you remove the chuck with piece still in it and stand up, you can get a better appreciation rather than looking horizontally. If you look at the third photo from the left - remove everything to the top of that abrupt transition and round the top into the mouth of the vase and a concave form following the top profile in the under portion of what now becomes the lip.

                  It is quite a nice piece of spalted maple, a bit deep for an early hollowing project and pretty narrow. The size could suit a large weed pot configuration where you just drill say a 1/2" or 5/8" hole rather than hollowing and then flaring out the top. Gives a convenient way to reverse mount and finish off the bottom too by just turning a short dowel to put the top on and supporting with tailstock removing all but a small nib and then slicing the nib off and sanding. I have some 36 grit paper I think I was using to remove tile grout after ripping up ceramic tile on a concrete floor, but have never considered using on any lathe work. Will admit to 60 or 80 once in a while for severe tearout. If you are hand sanding, I would suggest picking up a 2" velcro sanding mandrel and buying or making some disks or squares to attach and mounting in a high speed drill. Lathe speed low and drill speed high. When I joined the Golden Horseshoe Guild almost 20 years ago (having had a not too often used lathe for about 30 years after earlier high school experiences) one of the most profound discoveries was power sanding.

                  I was recently working with someone on bowl form and of several "bowl" books in my library, Richard Raffan's The Art of Turned Bowls, published in 2008 was the best with an excellent section on form. What he had to say for bowls easily translates to vases. Cindy Droza and Keith Tompkins have pretty good information on their sites about form as well. Both work with triangles that define the outer shape. With some of the remaining wood, maybe try something about six inches in total length. A small piece of 3/16" High Speed Steel (Busy Bee) in a 1/4" hole and secured with CA glue in a 1/2" cold rolled steel bar (Metal Supermarket, Home Depot, Princess Auto etc.) will make a first hollowing tool and a good opportunity to practice spindle work and make a handle. Looks at David Ellsworth's site or just Google for his hollowing tools. Have a look at Tools and Jigs at www.picturetrail.com/mikebrazeau

                  It is a good start and I echo Noel's comment about visiting the Thames Valley guild and hopefully joining. There is no better way than being able to work with someone as a mentor and you will be in a room with literally probably a couple of hundred years of good experience to draw on.


                  Thank you for your comments.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: New Project

                    Learning the technical, hands on, aspect of turning is essential. Others can give you great help on this.

                    Design & critiquing is something else. Much is made of shape in relationship to what is considered proper proportioning and sorta adhering to the so called guide lines of art. In the end this creates much similarity between all turnings. Almost as though mathematical dimensioning was is adhered to.

                    Art form should be an expression of the artist. A form that is not required to conform to what the so called critiques have deemed as proper.

                    With turning if you develop the skills to handle the manual shaping the form is yours to decide on!
                    Egon
                    from
                    The South Shore, Nova Scotia

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: New Project

                      Originally posted by Egon View Post
                      Learning the technical, hands on, aspect of turning is essential. Others can give you great help on this.

                      Design & critiquing is something else. Much is made of shape in relationship to what is considered proper proportioning and sorta adhering to the so called guide lines of art. In the end this creates much similarity between all turnings. Almost as though mathematical dimensioning was is adhered to.

                      Art form should be an expression of the artist. A form that is not required to conform to what the so called critiques have deemed as proper.

                      With turning if you develop the skills to handle the manual shaping the form is yours to decide on!
                      I agree 100% and am reminded of the saying that no one changed history by following the rules.

                      Comment

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