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  • Gouge ground

    Is it a dangerous question to ask for pictures of how people shape the cutting edge of their gouges, I'm not asking for what is right or wrong 'cos its everyone to there own, I would just like to see see what people do and for what purpose then I can decide where I go.
    Recently I bought 2 Hamlet and the cutting edge is very square ground, I think I like the wings ground back and have experimented with one of them, but what do others do??
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  • #2

    Re: Gouge ground

    I use mainly an Irish grind also known as a long grind or Ellsworth grind. 50-60 degree angle. I'll refer you to this guy for some really good sharpening info
    https://turnawoodbowl.com/bowl-gouge...strated-guide/
    I've also got gouges sharpened to other shapes as suggested in his article and each one has a use especially when dealing with tear out and difficult wood grains.
    Pete

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    • #3

      Re: Gouge ground

      Here are a few from a page on Woodcentral:

      http://www.woodcentral.com/newforum/grinds.shtml

      My typical grind is the Irish style with my Oneway Vari-grind setup as shown on the Thompson tools site.
      billh

       

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      • #4

        Re: Gouge ground

        If you haven't watched Stuart Batty, check this out    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7BjRcSDurM   According to him, 40 degrees is the magic number.

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        • #5

          Re: Gouge ground

          Suggest you try it and see if you like it. I did and no thanks. I know several others who had the same reaction. I think it's all about floating the bevel which he mentions a lot and you should do that with any grind. But the Irish grind is still my favorite because it is more versatile.

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          • #6

            Re: Gouge ground

            Originally posted by Roundhead View Post
            Suggest you try it and see if you like it. I did and no thanks. I know several others who had the same reaction. I think it's all about floating the bevel which he mentions a lot and you should do that with any grind. But the Irish grind is still my favorite because it is more versatile.
            I have mine ground at 35 45 50 and 55 degrees but its the amount of wing that interests me, I had bought two 2nd hand gouges they are like new and have almost flat ends, then a new comer to the wood turning club was asking me to sharpen his tools and it got me thinking what do I do with these 2 new gouges its a lot of steel to loose grinding on (or is that off) wings only to find I have gone too far, I guess it's hard to know if its just my skill level that needs improving or will I do better with a different grind but that seems like blaming the tool and I have been around long enough to know blaming the tool does not work.
            I also know there is an awful lot of s#it out there about how to do things written by people who have never done anything so its difficult to sort the wheat from the chaff which is why I asked to see what people were actually using, I of course realise there will be plenty of people ready to criticize if you show what you use so its a fine balance between being helpful as we all want to be and getting into a dispute over something trivial.
            However thanks for the link and your comments.

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            • #7

              Re: Gouge ground

              Bob, as I mentioned elsewhere I personally think it's the shape of the flute that's the most important thing on a bowl gouge. If you do a long or Irish grind it's possible to grind back the wings to the point where the gouge can be used almost upside down, or just far enough to the point where there's a sweet spot that offers the easiest passage through the wood with the least amount of effort. With a parabolic shaped flute the actual cutting angle on the wings varies slightly from the tip angle at different cutting spots on those wings. This is also true on V or U shaped flutes, but I find the difference in the wing side angles and the tip angle is more pronounced and definitely results in poorer cutting performance. If I was a math genius I could probably explain and show the differences in a formula but instead I have to try and explain with words and it's not easy.
              I've been a woodworker for 60+ years and sharpening tools has been a necessary evil which can make a tool a joy to use or a real PITA. Individualism dictates we all use our tools in a slightly different manner and by experimenting and observation it's possible to come up with a sharpening mantra to suit ourselves but be useless to others trying to achieve the same results. One size doesn't fit all as it were
              When I bought my latest gouge, a super flute Henry Taylor it came with the wings just as you described and like you my first thought was about all the metal I would have to remove to pull the wings back, but it only has to be done once! If I had bought the same gouge with Ellsworth name engraved on it the wings would already have been ground and I would be paying extra for that, but it might not suit how I use that gouge.
              So there are choices but trying out different grinds and profiles is not an expensive thing when considered with using CBN wheels. CBN removes less metal, gives a better edge and depletes the wallet in one big grab. So the cost of 2 gouges approximately but the more gouges you buy the longer they will last You can never have too many

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