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Turning ash

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  • #16

    Re: Turning ash

    Originally posted by Rolf In Burlington View Post
    wow, now I know why so many people have left this forum. You are stuck on convention and vernacular. I never stated I was turning an end grain vessel, I stated I was cutting a lot of end grain with my tools because the aspect ratio of my vessel is so large. When you remove material on a bowel you are pretty much only cutting across the grain. My tools are round and cut normal to the bored out surface of the wood. You and Egon can worry about convention and catastrophic accidents caused by not speaking in the vernacular.
    whoops; that was not my intention.
    I was only stating that on board you go from end grain to side grain.
    There was no mention of not speaking in the vernacular
    Egon
    from
    The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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    • #17

      Re: Turning ash

      Looking at the picture of the tool you posted with the black square shaft, it looks to me that the cutter is too horizontal. Ring tools, hook tools and the more modern Hunter type dished carbide are best used on an angle, somewhat like a shear scrape. The Hunter tool, the last picture in those posted by Leo, show the tilt angle that is used in the Lyle Jamieson mount of the #1 Hunter, a very small cutter, 6 mm or 7/32” in diameter (just measured mine). To reach in as deep as your vessel, hand held is also a difficult process. I was recently doing some spindle turning of ash I dried last year, making legs for a small biscuit deck table, and it is a beautiful wood to turn but it is hard and I was only working side grain. My large spindle roughing gouge was doing a great job on it and trying the skew just for the fun of it was not worth the effort.
      Last edited by Mike Brazeau; 04-11-2021, 01:17 PM.
      Mike

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      • #18

        Re: Turning ash

        I was having another look at this, this morning and for some reason I cannot see an edit possibility on my post of yesterday. I have another thought about the square shaft of your hollowing tool. It does not afford you much opportunity to play with the tilt angle when you are hollowing. Usually you play with the angle to find the sweet spot. Years ago when the Termite was more popular, many expressed their difficulty with using the tool. I made my own holder for a Hunter tool back in 2007 and have throughly enjoyed its use for lidded boxes. I bought the Jamieson adapter a couple of years later and use it both in a hand held and trapped system I built using Lyle Jamieson’s design.

        Edit - I wanted to add this when posting but our internet was almost dead earlier today. Herm DeVries in Winnipeg put this together on using the Termite tool. He also has a description of modifications he made to the tool holder under Tools on his site. https://www.hdv.net/tips/termite.htm
        Last edited by Mike Brazeau; 04-12-2021, 11:47 AM.
        Mike

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        • #19

          Re: Turning ash

          Originally posted by Rolf In Burlington View Post

          wow, now I know why so many people have left this forum. You are stuck on convention and vernacular. I never stated I was turning an end grain vessel, I stated I was cutting a lot of end grain with my tools because the aspect ratio of my vessel is so large. When you remove material on a bowel you are pretty much only cutting across the grain. My tools are round and cut normal to the bored out surface of the wood. You and Egon can worry about convention and catastrophic accidents caused by not speaking in the vernacular.
          No I'm pointing out there are ways to use tools that work and then there's those who think good tool use isn't necessary. Try looking out of your narrow world and you will find that a BOWL, not a bowel, has side and end grain. As the diagram Leo provided shows clearly if the tool is not moved in the right direction you will have problems. Of course you already knew that, right? That's why you came and asked.

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