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  • Old wood

    Over Easter I was invited to check out some wood with a mate, it was on a farm his uncle has, one boundary is a river with a log sticking out of the river bank they have stood on this log for years fishing, recently after some rain the river has carved out the river bank exposing more of the log, the log has had 6 foot of more of earth on top of it for who know how long, this is a big wide valley that has just seen the river change course over thousands of years and now it is extensively farmed as it is good growing land, the log has been pulled out as part of the river bank repair work, 30 strides long and about 3 feet high, a lot of it is very rotten but a lot is very solid and right out to the surface, we only cut off a few small pieces just so we can see what we are dealing with.
    It is very wet but water not sap, I turned one piece and what a wonderful golden color until 3 hours later, I expect when it dries I may see some of the golden color I have left it with a thick wall in a brown paper bag, wood that has been buried a long time is very valuable in NZ as it is becoming harder to find.
    KenL and QC Inspector like this.
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  • #2

    Re: Old wood

    All your NZ wood seems so exotic to me.
    Noel

    "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
    'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
    "

    John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Old wood

      Bob that red coloration is just beautiful, hope it will stil be there when dried, very often the old buried logs that are preserved in peat and dirt are just a stinking black color, not the original wood color, but yours there sat in sand right, that's got to make a difference, anyway thanks for the eye candy, and what a slow growth wood, hope you were wearing a raincoat

      Have fun and take care
      Leo Van Der Loo

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Old wood

        Lovely looking wood. So the wood goes from red to brown in 3 hours, wonder it it will change again when you finish it. Were you able to count the growth rings to age it? Nice find Bob, our old trees out here are never buried, just lay on the ground and rot.

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Old wood

          here's a good article about underwater harvesting.
          Here , when power dams were built, it sometimes was not profitable to remove them before land was flooded. now it's become profitable to remove it with divers and machinery.
          I didn't realize it affected the wood color,but it says:

          "When logs lay in muddy substrate for extended periods of time, the wood fiber absorbs the minerals and tannins found in the water and soil, which give the wood its unique hues of grey and olive green. If the logs were embedded in sandy soil, then the lumber may exhibit hues of red or deeper gold."

          https://www.custommade.com/blog/underwater-timber/

          what about ocean logs? they roll up on the beach and when high tide comes they dissapear. Its not uncommon for people to take chainsaws and start cutting planks. I believe there are regulations but the coastline here is so large that people do it anyway. I assume the same logs must drift all over the world and I often wonder where they came from or how old they are. or what difference sea water would make to the wood itself.

          we have a bird sanctuary here , "boundary bay" and they drift in and collect and I believe there was even a government project to clear them away because they make the shoreline "messy" basically.
          People who own beach homes dont own the actual beach and they are often upset because "their beach" becomes unwalkable and people start towing them out to sea and releasing them in order to cope with the perceived "problem" every time there is a storm and a high tide they move around so likely many have moved location many times.

          it would perhaps be interesting to get samples and for someone with expertise in wood species to identify them on the beach. would the shores of NZ have the same species as here, or would they be more local?

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Old wood

            Sea water is a real pain. I recently did some refinishing on a Honduras Mahogany table from 1780-1830. The wood was used as ships ballast and the huge logs thrown overboard to compensate for the change from salt to fresh water when sailing into the port of London UK. The wood was scavenged by cabinet shops and a craze for all things mahogany was started resulting in the rise of Mr Chippendale among others. The mahogany then became a major import for ships with empty holds after unloading slaves.
            The table had been French Polished over a seal coat of shellac and pumice powder. I soon found out the salt was still in the wood as any fresh finish, shellac, or even varnish ended up with strange eruptions in the surface. I persisted in adding coats of finish and sanding back until at last the salt was no longer coming to the surface, it was a nightmare.

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            • #7

              Re: Old wood

              Originally posted by stickman View Post
              here's a good article about underwater harvesting.
              Here , when power dams were built, it sometimes was not profitable to remove them before land was flooded. now it's become profitable to remove it with divers and machinery.
              I didn't realize it affected the wood color,but it says:
              "When logs lay in muddy substrate for extended periods of time, the wood fiber absorbs the minerals and tannins found in the water and soil, which give the wood its unique hues of grey and olive green. If the logs were embedded in sandy soil, then the lumber may exhibit hues of red or deeper gold."
              https://www.custommade.com/blog/underwater-timber/
              what about ocean logs? they roll up on the beach and when high tide comes they dissapear. Its not uncommon for people to take chainsaws and start cutting planks. I believe there are regulations but the coastline here is so large that people do it anyway. I assume the same logs must drift all over the world and I often wonder where they came from or how old they are. or what difference sea water would make to the wood itself.
              we have a bird sanctuary here , "boundary bay" and they drift in and collect and I believe there was even a government project to clear them away because they make the shoreline "messy" basically.
              People who own beach homes dont own the actual beach and they are often upset because "their beach" becomes unwalkable and people start towing them out to sea and releasing them in order to cope with the perceived "problem" every time there is a storm and a high tide they move around so likely many have moved location many times.
              it would perhaps be interesting to get samples and for someone with expertise in wood species to identify them on the beach. would the shores of NZ have the same species as here, or would they be more local?
              Logs that float in the ocean are attacked by the so-called shipworm they are very destructive, and have caused the sinking of thousands of wood hulled ships, eating wood that are used as seawalls and docks as well.
              Here are two pictures of wood that has floated in the ocean and part of a writeup about the shipworms.



              Have fun and take care
              Leo Van Der Loo

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Old wood

                Thanks Leo , for some reason I couldn't view the image of your three attachments.

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Old wood

                  Originally posted by stickman View Post
                  Thanks Leo , for some reason I couldn't view the image of your three attachments.
                  I don't know why this is happening, all the pictures are the same jpeg/jpg and not too large, I'll try them again.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	shipworm infested log.jpg
Views:	102
Size:	255.0 KB
ID:	1325864
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Ship worms.jpeg
Views:	92
Size:	115.7 KB
ID:	1325865
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Infested log with shipworm.jpg
Views:	90
Size:	135.1 KB
ID:	1325866

                  Have fun and take care
                  Leo Van Der Loo

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Old wood

                    You sure get some interesting wood to work with in New Zealand, like the shape of the bowl.

                    Paul

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