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Gouge size and log rolling

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  • #16

    Re: Gouge size and log rolling

    All sharpening does is remove a bit of metal. In spite of fancy wheels of larger diameters and much pontificating on the subject, a 6" gray carborundum wheel will do just that to get you going. A jig isn't essential but many of us like them such as the Oneway Vari-grind jig and Wolverine setup which generally don't care which grinder it is used with so it will still be useable if you get a different grinder.
    billh

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    • #17

      Re: Gouge size and log rolling

      I studied up on the Oneway Wolverine setup and another one that came up on Amazon called the Pro Grind Sharpening System. Although the Wolverine is the better of the two I ended up going with the Pro Grind because the full setup comes in at around half the price of the Oneway. At 4.5 stars the only complaint with it was that the cam lock allowed for some slippage when engaged, which can be solved by grinding off the shiny finishes of the friction surfaces.

      Question I have now is about grinding wheels, again. Watched a video about CBN wheels Ken from Woodturner's Wonders and he recommended having a 2 wheel setup using grits 120 and 600. The Rikon 80-805 8" Slow Bench Grinder I'm planning on comes with 60 and 120 grit wheels, and this seems to be the grinder (and wheels possibly) featured in other how to sharpen videos.

      Do I need to change to 120 and 600 grit wheels like Ken suggests, or is that only for the CBN wheels?
      If the end of the world ever comes move to Kentucky, because everything there happens 20 years later. ~ Mark Twain

      History began on July 4, 1776. Everything before that was a mistake. ~ Ron Swanson

      The economy of what you say lends more to it's meaning than the depth of it's exclamation.

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      • #18

        Re: Gouge size and log rolling

        Originally posted by Bob just past Ayr View Post
        You could also take a rope ; chain or ratchet type tie down and loop it over the log and pull the action pulls the log and rolls it at the same time , Watch some u tube vidos and you will get some ideas, Some are safer than others.
        People likely remember the beachcombers and how they moved a log like this when they towed it off the beach with a boat. it was at the beginning or end? of each episode. I figured that image is probably still stuck in the heads of the older members anyway.. Maybe you can use a come-along? tie off to another tree? yse some risks involved , the weight of the log and the possibility of sometime snapping , maybe a logging chain is safer than a rope.

        I like this video especially his lifting technique. I have to lift a 300 lb bathtub onto my porch and Ive been considering a technique that uses similar principles to do it myself, slowly and with controlled steps , rather than harnessing a bunch of guys with different ides that will surely be bashing everything, I can do it slowly by myself. I feel the video is a good demonstration about how a guy can move stuff by himself that is super heavy.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-K7q...annel=giorkos3

        Last edited by stickman; 09-21-2021, 12:33 PM.

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        • #19

          Re: Gouge size and log rolling

          Originally posted by stickman View Post

          People likely remember the beachcombers and how they moved a log like this when they towed it off the beach with a boat. it was at the beginning or end? of each episode…
          What a great Canadian TV show!

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          • #20

            Re: Gouge size and log rolling

            Originally posted by bradleyheathhays View Post
            I studied up on the Oneway Wolverine setup and another one that came up on Amazon called the Pro Grind Sharpening System. Although the Wolverine is the better of the two I ended up going with the Pro Grind because the full setup comes in at around half the price of the Oneway. At 4.5 stars the only complaint with it was that the cam lock allowed for some slippage when engaged, which can be solved by grinding off the shiny finishes of the friction surfaces.

            Question I have now is about grinding wheels, again. Watched a video about CBN wheels Ken from Woodturner's Wonders and he recommended having a 2 wheel setup using grits 120 and 600. The Rikon 80-805 8" Slow Bench Grinder I'm planning on comes with 60 and 120 grit wheels, and this seems to be the grinder (and wheels possibly) featured in other how to sharpen videos.

            Do I need to change to 120 and 600 grit wheels like Ken suggests, or is that only for the CBN wheels?
            Don't change anything until you gain some experience and get an idea on what you want to change to and why.

            There are hundreds of grit recommendations for turning tools along with the type of wheels. There certainly is no one-size is seen as perfect by everybody.
            Before I got my 180x CBN wheel I used a Norton Blue 8" 180 grit which is a fairly common grit for turning tools. For a grinding wheel I recommend a Norton Blue because it is friable but does not wear quickly, usually in the form of a groove in the middle of the wheel, when grinding turning tools like the white wheels. The white wheels LV sells are good for carving tools.
            The grinder you referenced is a 1/2 HP. If you go to CBN wheels which are heavier, especially the steel ones, you will likely find it will labour trying to start. Not a show stopper, I have a 1/2HP GI grinder and I just spin the CBN wheel by hand to help it start - it has 1 regular and 1 CBN wheel. A 1 HP grinder is better but they are costlier.

            No end to it, is there!

            billh

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            • #21

              Re: Gouge size and log rolling

              Sorry I've never seen the TV show you mentioned as I'm in the US, but what a cool video stickman! Wonder if he ever got the full 8 stones set upright like he mentioned toward the end? I tried the website mentioned but it doesn't seem functional anymore.

              OH man no end to it is certainly right billh! Took the words right out of my mouth. I read some suggestions then I decide to go this way, then I read on some more and decide to go that way. I'm sure I'll find my groove here shortly once I get my initial setup in place and start working. I have the Rikon set up now and it came with a 60 and 120 grit aluminum oxide wheels. I've been advised not to do sharpening with anything less than 180 grit using any kind wheel, so I'm thinking about keeping the 60 grit AO and getting the 600 grit CBN. At least that'll let me ease into CBN without the higher price of getting 2 wheels at once. The 1/2 HP is a bit of a drag but the 1 HP grinder was $100 more, so if I have to hand start it I figure no big deal really.

              no end!
              If the end of the world ever comes move to Kentucky, because everything there happens 20 years later. ~ Mark Twain

              History began on July 4, 1776. Everything before that was a mistake. ~ Ron Swanson

              The economy of what you say lends more to it's meaning than the depth of it's exclamation.

              Comment

              • Thread Continues Below...

              • #22

                Re: Gouge size and log rolling

                Originally posted by bradleyheathhays View Post
                Sorry I've never seen the TV show you mentioned as I'm in the US, but what a cool video stickman! Wonder if he ever got the full 8 stones set upright like he mentioned toward the end? I tried the website mentioned but it doesn't seem functional anymore.
                the beachcombers had a clip that was repeated. they had a rope run around a log in such a way that when they towed it onto the beach and into the water with another boat it rolled the log and pulled it at the same time.

                this weekend I had to get my "new" 100 year old bathtub up onto my porch. It was about 300 lbs.. I painted the outside of it and was using an electrolysis bath to remove the rust from the feet and I got those cleaned up nice primered. the electrolysis bath is just water and borax and sacrificial steel rod that attracts the rust and a battery charger. it bubbled away for a while and all the tenacious milk paint and rust came off... They are cast iron feet with a ball and claw design so I thought I;d paint the legs black to match the tub and the balls white and maybe paint in the claws after to accentuate them a bit.. the white ceramic has a few dings but not bad for the age. it matches the age of my house so I though tit would be a neat authentic feature to put one back that is more authentic to the age ..

                I had it outside but didn't want o leave it there all winter, once I have a space for it Ill bring it in but i can cover it near the house for now. It was raining so hard it was filling up ;-)

                i had onhand a bunch of 3x3's about 6' long.
                so I just laid two one way and two the other way. I placed the ones under the tub in about a foot or so from each end. so they were about 4' apart.

                that way i could pretty easily tip it one way and since the one it sat on was not right at the edge it was easy to lift since I had the center of gravity working for me. Then I could just tip it up, and stick one more under. and so on..


                I ended up with it about 4' off the ground and level with the porch sitting on top of my pile of 3x3's
                from there I got some planks under it and slid it onto my porch. it worked. !

                that avoided needing like 4 guys all trying to climb the stairs carrying the thing. I moved it upside down and I put some little wood strips under it to sort of skid it on. the rain helped it slide better.

                this was basically the same principles as his video.

                the other thing I like doing is if I have something heavy and if I can get some planks under it, Ill stick some pieces of small pipe like 3/4 conduit between the planks. then it rolls easy . If it's super heavy and the pipe will dent the wood then you can use steel plates. the movers usually use hardened spring steel plated for heavy machinery.
                you can steer the load by placing the steel tubing at a slight angle and you just take any that roll out from one end and keep moving the pipes and planks along. you can move a heavy log by yourself this way . maybe with a pry bar or a come-along to help.

                if you move things like machines this way you just need to be mindful that if it's tall and has a high center of gravity you want to use small pipe and be careful you dont put it in a situation where it can tip over and fall on someone. its hard to flatten conduit but you can use steel bar if it's super heavy.

                you can move really heavy things without straining your back with these principles. You can move logs without machinery too. I just do it little by little in small steps that are thought out. if you find you are straining yourself usually you can use leverage in some way to gain more advantage. If you dont put it into a dangerous position you can always stop for coffee and dont need to involve a bunch of people.



                Last edited by stickman; Yesterday, 12:19 PM.

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