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  • RobertF
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Thanks for the info thenewguy, it looked similar but wasnt sure, it seems like such a good deal but its just not my style i usually buy the best one first but 5 times the price to try something new seems like alot, thanks for all the advice guys very appreciated

    Leave a comment:


  • thenewguy
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Hey Robert, I no that I sent you a messege in your private message box but I have been following this post just to see what everyone is saying. That lathe looks the same as the BB lathe. If you google it and get a better picture then you will be able to tell. They are all manufactured in China by the same place. Anyway it will still need the speed control cleaned and lobricated regularily to make it work right. Good price on that lathe though.Good luck

    Leave a comment:


  • mreza
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    It looks like it's the same lathe I have (and bought used).
    This lathe comes in many different brands (just different color). It's a basic lathe and Ok to start learning. At that price I think it's not a bad deal.
    Once you learn the technique and know what you want you'll buy a good lathe.

    Leave a comment:


  • RobertF
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    I took the advice and looked online for a used lathe, i found the only on near me that resembled what i was looking for was a MasterCraft 36" wood lathe never used bought a year ago, asking price is 150.00

    attached is the info he sent me,

    thanks any comments/ suggestions would be great

    Robert
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • RobertF
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Thanks

    I think i was incorrect in my technical thinking, all lathes vary in speed but the difference is that some are a pulley system while others are mechanically adjust the speed. That was my misunderstanding

    Also any good safety books or videos id like to be well prepared

    Robert

    Leave a comment:


  • Leo Van Der Loo
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Originally posted by RobertF View Post
    Wow
    Thanks for all the help so far,

    /snip/

    Also Leo what Mike where you talking about on this page as there quite a few of them

    /snip/

    Thanks
    Robert
    It was DaveD, you will find him as Busy Bee Tools now in the members list.

    I have a picture of the lathe here
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Hamilton
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Mechanical variable speed lathes (Reeves drive) have a practical limit on low end speed of 500 to 600 rpm. If you want lower speeds than that there are really only two alternatives. One is to get a non-variable speed lathe (the kind with step pulleys) and install an intermediate jack shaft with step pulleys so that the motor drives the jack shaft and the jack shaft drives the spindle, allowing a two stage reduction of the motor speed to get down to what you want. The other is to get an electronic variable speed system which allows lowering the motor speed directly. Purchasing a lathe with factory designed and installed electronic variable speed is quite a bit more expensive than any of the mechanical variations. Some folks that know a lot more about electrical and electronic work than I do have put together their own variable speed systems so it is possible to get there on the cheap but you need to know what you are doing.

    Frankly the difference between 500 and 600 rpm is not so huge that I would eliminate a lathe from consideration based on that alone. Probably well over half of the lathes on the market won't go slower than 500 rpm. You can turn an awful lot of stuff without ever going below 500 rpm. It is nice to have lower speeds for starting out rough blanks and for sanding but careful preparation and balancing of the blank before mounting will go a long way towards eliminating problems.

    Good Luck!
    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • RobertF
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Wow
    Thanks for all the help so far, the wealth of knowledge is amazing.

    So firstly i want to ensure what i learned is right
    -There are some lathes that come with variable speed and some with not
    -That 600 rpm is a high low end speed and im looking for something more in the 500 rpms
    -I should be looking for a used lathe, i have no time restrain here so i should really look around for one


    So what i should be looking for is..
    - A variable speed lathe
    -Have a large swing

    Also Leo what Mike where you talking about on this page as there quite a few of them

    Thanks alot Marty i have just emailed the edmonton guild, but it seems that the email address isnt working anymore.

    Thanks
    Robert
    Last edited by RobertF; 03-14-2009, 02:40 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marty in St. John's
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Hi Robert
    I would suggest attending the Edmonton Woodturners Guild meetings before you purchase a lathe. You will be able to try out lathes from members before you purchase and usually one turner is in the process of upgrading to a bigger lathe. As a result of their upgrade a used lathe is looking for a good home. You can also get mentoring from some of the more experienced turners and purchase advice on selecting a lathe. This will help improve your turning skills and make a better informed purchase of your lathe. I have included the info from the AAW website for the Edmonton Guild. You can also go to the Strathcona MArket to see some fantastic turnings by Brian McEvoy and he might give you some info as well.

    Hope this helps.

    Marty

    Edmonton Woodturners Guild
    Area Served: Edmonton and surrounding area
    Meeting City: Edmonton
    Meeting State: AB
    Meeting Place: Fx Woodworks
    Meeting Date: 2nd Thursday
    Number of Members: 45
    Contact:
    Darcy Kennedy
    6825 40th Ave
    Edmonton, AB T6K 1R9
    780-463-2572
    2djkennedy@interbaun.com

    AAW website
    www.woodturner.org

    Leave a comment:


  • Leo Van Der Loo
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Welcome aboard Robert
    A lathe to turn baseball bats on, can be done on just about anything that has a Shaft and tailstock with a motor driving it, turning usable size salad bowl you do nee a more substantial lathe.
    The little General is not a very good lathe IMO, the other mini/midi lathes are just as good or better for a lower price.
    The BB lathe you linked to isn't a high quality lathe either but you do get quit a bit for your money really, considering what they are selling it for on sale, pretty hard to beat that, even if you only turn on it for a year or two and then get a lathe that suits you better, you could sell this one, and the whole thing would cost you really very little $$$

    But for about the same money you could get a new Delta Midi lathe, (not a variable speed) as I was quoted $389.-- for the 46-455, that is a very nice lathe according a report from a turner that actually tested the new Delta Midi 46-460, which is the variable speed Midi.
    His statement that he was sorry to have to give the little lathe back did say enough by itself.
    Now I tried, but could not find the lathe at the Busy Bee website, but I was quoted the number and prices by Dave that is a member here and is from Busy Bee, so you might have to contact him if you want more info.

    About the extensions, IMO it is a low cost way to get a longer lathe, handy to park the tailstock out of your way if you don't need it while turning, and you could tack a few extensions on for some extra long pieces to turn, pretty hard to do with a standard size lathe.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Hamilton
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Hi:
    For what you describe as your goals I would say the General would not be a good choice, not because it is not a good lathe but because it only has a 10" swing. That means that the largest disk that you can mount is 10 inches in diameter. In the real world the practical maximum would probably be closer to 9" because unless the disk is perfectly round and mounted perfectly on center you will find that the 10" disk will hit on the bed somewhere during its rotation. Now you can turn a lot of nice things that are smaller than 9" in diameter but I really think you would find it pretty limiting very quickly and want to upgrade to something with more swing.

    The Busy Bee lathe has the capacity to turn larger diameters and is already long enough for a baseball bat. The major deficiency with it is that the low end speed is 600 rpm which is pretty high for starting a large out of balance bowl blank. Unfortunately the high low end speed is a problem inherent with a Reeves drive variable speed system so that deficiency will carry over to all Reeves drive variable speed lathes. That said, I started out with a 12" Reeves drive Delta and turned on it for 12 years before I upgraded to my present lathe. The headstock on the Busy Bee lathe can swivel and appears to be able to slide down the length of the bed as well, which is a handy feature in a small shop where you don't have the space to stand off the left end of the lathe. The offset tool rest that is shown in the picture is not used except when the head is swiveled and the tool rest is on the left end of the bed. They are notorious for breaking if you get a catch while using them so I would avoid using it until you get more experience. For normal turning the tool rest post goes directly into the cross slide rather than into the offset.

    What Brian said about finding a turning club is good advice and there is another benefit that might not be obvious. If there is a fairly large membership then the chances are good that someone will be planning to upgrade and you might get early warning of a good used lathe becoming available. The downside is that anyone upgrading to a new lathe is likely going to be keeping most of their tooling.

    My opinions here are based solely on the specs provided in your links, not with any personal experience with either of the lathes in question.

    Good Luck!
    Bob
    Last edited by Bob Hamilton; 03-13-2009, 11:30 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian_ToyGuy
    replied
    Re: Baseball Bat Lathe

    Robert. welcome to the forum. There is a lot of knowledgeable fellows here.

    It wasn't very long ago I was asking the same questions. So lets see if I can answer you.

    First off, I can't address either of the lathes you mention as I have no practical experience with them. The General International (25-100) is not a bad little lathe, but I do think you would like the next one up from that a bit more. (25-200vs). The 200 has a variable speed unit and I do know a couple that own them and are quite happy with them.

    The Craftex 2338 also has a variable speed but is a reeds drive. Not that there is anything wrong with that, a mechanical drive just requires a bit more maintenance. There is a couple of guys here that own craftex lathes. They are reasonably priced and I suspect that there is a reason for that....... With power tools, one gets what one pays for.... Just my opinion.

    OK now for what you really should be doing........ Buy a used machine.
    Check out the Kijiji and Craigslist. Also have a look here at the classifieds. This is how I got my machine. Kijiji, just 100 mile from me and I found a General International 25-650 that was almost brand new for half the cost. Even got some tools with it. The owner had passed away, his misfortune was my luck.

    Now for tools. When you buy a lathe try and get some in the deal. You might even be able to do this on a new one in this economy of ours. There is a number of sets on the market. Again I have not bought a set so can't really speak to this subject..... BUT. You do not need too many tools to get started. Roughing gouge, spindle gouge, bowl gouge and a parting tool, maybe a skew. There is lots of tools out there and time to buy them once you figure out what you need.

    Now, be prepared....buying the lathe is only about half your cost of turning. It almost never ends as far as I can tell. Other things you will need/want/and can't live without...... Grinder and a jig (oneway Wolverine or equivalent) for sharpening is a must have. A scroll chuck (oneway Talon) would not want to be with out. With the chuck you will want a bunch of other jaw sets. Books, videos, Tools and lots more tools. It never ends, and I am just getting started as well.

    You should also give joining a club a serious thought. Often the members have a lot of advise and might even know where you can find yourself everything you need.

    Hope this is of help to you. I'm sure there is a bunch of more qualified guys here that will chime in......... Good Luck.
    Last edited by Brian_ToyGuy; 03-13-2009, 09:12 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • RobertF
    started a topic Baseball Bat Lathe

    Baseball Bat Lathe

    Im looking to purchase a lathe that will be able to one day turn a baseball bat and then after that bowls efficiently.

    I was taught some woodworking by my Shop teacher but have decided to throw it all out the window and start again since after talking to a few other turners he was dangerous and incompetent.

    I also do not expect to be able to make a bat right away i just want it long enough to turn one when i have the skills

    i am looking at:
    http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid=15252

    with the bed extension to make it 45 inches long

    or

    http://busybeetools.ca/cgi-bin/picture10?NTITEM=B2338

    Im wondering about pros and cons of the bed extension since i wont be making many long items.

    Also any other suggestions would be amazing, as well as what a good start up kit for a tool set would be?

    Thanks Tons
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