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  • Delta tenoning jig

    Hi guys,

    I was invited to go through a wood shop as part of an estate sale. I came across this older Delta tenoning jig and I though I'd ask if anyone has an opinion on it or can suggest a value. I've never used one before but it seems like a nice solid jig. Seems like i'ts all there but has no manual so I'm kind of in the dark.
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  • #2

    Re: Delta tenoning jig

    Google is your friend there are plenty of instructions videos and pdf's available

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Delta tenoning jig

      I use one very similar on a regular basis. Very nice if you are doing multiple tenons. Use is pretty well intuitive; crosscut to set the length of the tenon then use the jig to finish the cheeks.
      I don't know about value; I picked up the one I have on kijiji for $30
      The difference between a master and a beginner: The master has failed more times than the beginner has even tried.

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      • #4

        Re: Delta tenoning jig

        It appears all there - little to be missing. Completely intuitive but UTube undouibtably has videos of use. Numerous 'brannded' knockoffs abound. I don't use mine much because of other methods since acquired (I switched to loose tenons) but it is great if youi use suich tenons take it for $30-something.

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Delta tenoning jig

          Thanks Guys! I Also found a "Leigh FMT jig for a router" . Didn't know what it was at the time as I'm used to working with much simpler tools. It appears that they are very expensive brand new. Would it be worth making an offer on? What would they be worth used? This is just a stock pick but the actual one comes with a Dewalt D625-04 plunge router.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Delta tenoning jig

            tenon jig, even new in box on kijiji is $80, so if you see yourself using it, $50 is a good deal so maybe start a bit lower.

            Leigh jig with a router... maybe check condition and original prices.
            I'm normally content paying 1/2 of new value on certain items, condition has big part to play in that though.
            [insert something witty here]

            Comment

            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: Delta tenoning jig

              the problem with using a tenoning jig like that for making tenons is you are registering the wood to one side. If you cut the mortices by flipping them and using the saw you are registering to both sides. . assume there are some minor differences in thickness of your wood parts which is hard to avoid there will then be a step where the parts meet.

              . there is a technique where you can put the wood through against the fence in an upright position using a square block to follow it. In this way you can flip the wood and cut both cheeks against the fence and thus register to both sides. registering to both sides splits the difference and this is the method I prefer.. some could argue this is dangerous and I don't think I would recommend it to a beginner who isn't' used to the saw.

              for myself, I bought the tenoinging jig thinking it would make repetitive tasks easier but I found that I prefer to flip the parts and make them register to both sides. In this way the variance will show up in the tightness of the fit of the mortice and tennon. they do reduce the risk of injury by holding the piece for you.

              it might depend what you are using the pieces for. If you are making cupboard doors where you see both sides you dont; wnat that step on either side and to split the difference minimizes how visible it is. If you are making panels that are only visible one side you can put the side with the step away from view. I think you can find used ones because people buy them with good intention and then dont; use them so much as they first thought but I wouldnt' go so far as to say they are useless. they do acurately hold the work and you can use them to make cuts that are quite accurate.

              Its a bit hard for me to explain but basicly I prefer to flip the wood and use the fence and adjust my fit later than to have to remove some thickness form one piece or the other to remove the step created by minor differences in material thickness.

              If you thickness plane all your pieces in one run you can minimize these thickness inaccuracies and in theory there would be no differences in stock thickness.
              but I have found that in practice I am happier registering both pieces to both sides than to register the tennons to both sides ( by cut int them and flipping them and cutting the opposite side.) than register the mortices to only one side which is unavoidable with the jig.

              If that didn't' make sense Im not surprised it is a bit hard to explain in words and there are some different techniques to cut mortices and tennons.
              Last edited by phil; 10-12-2017, 11:41 AM.
              “The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” -Bertrand Russell

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Delta tenoning jig

                Originally posted by phil View Post
                the problem with using a tenoning jig like that for making tenons is you are registering the wood to one side. If you cut the mortices by flipping them and using the saw you are registering to both sides. . assume there are some minor differences in thickness of your wood parts which is hard to avoid there will then be a step where the parts meet.

                . there is a technique where you can put the wood through against the fence in an upright position using a square block to follow it. In this way you can flip the wood and cut both cheeks against the fence and thus register to both sides. registering to both sides splits the difference and this is the method I prefer.. some could argue this is dangerous and I don't think I would recommend it to a beginner who isn't' used to the saw.

                for myself, I bought the tenoinging jig thinking it would make repetitive tasks easier but I found that I prefer to flip the parts and make them register to both sides. In this way the variance will show up in the tightness of the fit of the mortice and tennon. they do reduce the risk of injury by holding the piece for you.

                it might depend what you are using the pieces for. If you are making cupboard doors where you see both sides you dont; wnat that step on either side and to split the difference minimizes how visible it is. If you are making panels that are only visible one side you can put the side with the step away from view. I think you can find used ones because people buy them with good intention and then dont; use them so much as they first thought but I wouldnt' go so far as to say they are useless. they do acurately hold the work and you can use them to make cuts that are quite accurate.

                Its a bit hard for me to explain but basicly I prefer to flip the wood and use the fence and adjust my fit later than to have to remove some thickness form one piece or the other to remove the step created by minor differences in material thickness.

                If you thickness plane all your pieces in one run you can minimize these thickness inaccuracies and in theory there would be no differences in stock thickness.
                but I have found that in practice I am happier registering both pieces to both sides than to register the tennons to both sides ( by cut int them and flipping them and cutting the opposite side.) than register the mortices to only one side which is unavoidable with the jig.

                If that didn't' make sense Im not surprised it is a bit hard to explain in words and there are some different techniques to cut mortices and tennons.
                Don't you flip the board around when using a tenoning jig? I thought you set the width of the cheek on the jig, cut one cheek, flip board around, cut the other cheek. That is referencing off both faces n'est-ce pas?
                Cheers
                Randy

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Delta tenoning jig

                  I have a tenon jig similar to the Delta one and I use it for most of the larger furniture projects that I do (hand tools only for the smaller articles). It is really simple to set up and use; many of the New Yankee Workshop episodes show Norm using one of those for tenons.

                  I don't know how, assuming that you plane all of the mating stock to thickness at the same time (surely you do that??), that you would end up with other than a perfectly centred, constant thickness tenon using the jig and flipping the piece side to side (ala Norm Abram) to cut matching cheeks. Cutting the matching mortice to properly locate your beautiful tenon and keep it all centred is the real challenge. Tenon jigs are useful tools that get a rather hard knock sometimes when the real issue is lack of control of the workflow by the user, IMO anyway.

                  My 2 cents

                  Ken

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                  • #10

                    Re: Delta tenoning jig

                    Thanks so much for your advice guys. I'm picking it up for $30 with a bunch of other stuff. Any more feedback on the Leigh FMT jig I mentioned in the thread?

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                    • #11

                      Re: Delta tenoning jig

                      Check Lee Valley for info on the FMT jig. They sell 2 models and the prices are from just under $700 to just over $1300.

                      Comment

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                      • #12

                        Re: Delta tenoning jig

                        i had a delta tenon jig just like that. gave it away. i use a shopmade one that straddles and slides on my saw fence
                        my biggest beef was that tiny piece of angle material that acts as a "guage" when clamping the workpiece
                        my shop is a beaver lodge
                        steve, sarnia, ont



                        1940's Beaver Jointer

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                        • #13

                          Re: Delta tenoning jig

                          That Leigh jig is the expensive one, they make a Super FMT jig but having been there intended to cut cost, I strongly advise you to move past it. It makes a fine tenon, but only after you go through excessive setup in my opinion. It was fine in its original time period but various loose tenon jigs are now preferable. I am sorry I bought the Super MFT which is the less expensive version that is intended to compete with the competition but is the same operation. Move past it.

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                          • #14

                            Re: Delta tenoning jig

                            Originally posted by stevem View Post
                            i had a delta tenon jig just like that. gave it away. i use a shopmade one that straddles and slides on my saw fence
                            my biggest beef was that tiny piece of angle material that acts as a "guage" when clamping the workpiece
                            Funny, I have had no concerns at all with the angle piece. It does its job very well IMO and I have used my jig a lot.
                            The difference between a master and a beginner: The master has failed more times than the beginner has even tried.

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: Delta tenoning jig

                              Originally posted by stevem

                              i had a delta tenon jig just like that. gave it away. i use a shopmade one that straddles and slides on my saw fence
                              my biggest beef was that tiny piece of angle material that acts as a "guage" when clamping the workpiece
                              Originally posted by smallerstick View Post
                              Funny, I have had no concerns at all with the angle piece. It does its job very well IMO and I have used my jig a lot.
                              Yup, I have the same jig and while I haven't used it extensively, I have used it enough to know it well and I've had no trouble at all.

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