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Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

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  • Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

    I've been perusing Stockroom Supply's website this morning and came across this Youtube video.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4k-r5utmU2Q

    Either that's the most amazing thing I've ever seen done with a bandsaw or he's full of crap.
    Anyone seen a little ripper in action before?
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  • #2

    Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

    In my mind, a crowned wheel or pulley will always pull the belt (or band) back to the top. Wouldn't this be the case here or is the reduced tension getting around that?
    Happiness is a new blade!

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    • #3

      Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

      From what I've learned reading/watching videos/ etc etc (I'm not the expert but listened to/read experts) the drift is caused by improperly positioned thrust bearings, and when the too much pressure is put on the blade, it presses against the thrust bearing and has to go somewhere, and that somewhere is sideways.

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      • #4

        Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

        You ,may be right.
        When I think about it...The more pressure you put on the blade the more that blade is going to want to move back on the tires. That's why the thrust bearing is there...so you can't push the blade off the wheel.
        After studying the video that's the one thing he doesn't screw with...the thrust bearing.
        Also did you notice how high he had the guides set??

        What really gets me is after taking off the guides, lowering the tension and messing with the wheel setup he cuts perfect.
        I spend 30mins setting up my saw and still struggle.

        I'd like to know what blade hes using.

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        • #5

          Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

          Originally posted by guylavoie View Post
          In my mind, a crowned wheel or pulley will always pull the belt (or band) back to the top. Wouldn't this be the case here or is the reduced tension getting around that?
          He adjusted the blade tracking, tilting the wheel effectively moves the "top" of the crown.

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          • #6

            Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

            Originally posted by woodhack1 View Post

            He adjusted the blade tracking, tilting the wheel effectively moves the "top" of the crown.
            Good point!
            So like he says...it really doesn't make a difference where you put the blade on the wheel.

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            • #7

              Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

              Very impressive, I understood drift was occurred when one side of the blade was sharper than the other so the blade cuts more aggressively on one side compared to the other usually caused by cutting curves. Regardless of the cause I can see how moving the wood on a track prevents the problem. Only question now is whether to buy a Little Ripper or make a DIY version. Perfect timing for me as I just picked up some cherry logs and will be sawing logs on my bandsaw for the first time.

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              • #8

                Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

                R&D sells it, as does stockroom supply

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                • #9

                  Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

                  That's about a 3" to 4" thick piece of oak he is slicing, and with some good rate of feed.. That blade has to have been freshly sharpened. I have never been able to cut that thickness at his rate of feed, especially in dense hardwoods. He forgot to mention blade sharpness, but maybe it's implied as with all wood cutting tools.

                  As as for the little ripper. It's basically the same set up as a bandsaw log mill. The wood is positioned on the outside of the blade track ( below the blade and both wheels). On most shop bandsaws, the wood is positioned within the blade track ( between the upper and lower wheels) especially if using a fence. Why that makes a difference, I don't know? Never seen a bandsaw log mill drift.
                  Last edited by Kunzwerks; 11-09-2017, 07:10 PM.
                  Measure twice, cut once ... and if that doesn't work try again

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                  • #10

                    Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

                    Originally posted by Kunzwerks View Post
                    Never seen a bandsaw log mill drift.
                    They do. Usually if something is wonky with the blade, like you hit a piece of metal in the log.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

                      I have both a horizontal bandmill and a vertical shop bandsaw. The bandmill blade will drift up or down when it has lost its edge and needs re-sharpened. The bandsaw is very prone to drift - with all but the little Ripper. Even using the fence I can get a straight resaw with that blade. Makes it very useful indeed. I assume that the tooth geometry must play a role in this performance.

                      Glenn
                      Wally in Calgary likes this.

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                      • #12

                        Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

                        Assuming we don't hit a nail and have a sharp blade, a horizontal bandmill will cut perfectly even thickness slabs/planks. Done it many times and always happiy with the results.

                        Sorry Glenn, I don't understand your comment .... "Even using the fence I can get a straight resaw with that blade". Are you talking about the little ripper fence? And what blade? Just explain a little more if you would.
                        Measure twice, cut once ... and if that doesn't work try again

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                        • #13

                          Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

                          So the only time a bandsaw mill drifts is if you hit a nail or something? So basically when you wreck the set in the teeth?
                          Sounds like Ethan isn't crazy....he's saying that as long as you don't change the set on the blade it will cut straight no matter the guides, tension or setup.

                          I'm going to see if they do a christmas sale...The little ripper is on my wish list!

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                          • #14

                            Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

                            I wish I had a nickel for every time we discuss bandsaw drift.

                            I use as wide and as coarse a blade as possible for all sawing. I tension it properly.

                            The fence is adjusted parallel to the mitre saw groove, and the blade tracking adjusted so that the blade is centered in the kerf. Note that this shouldn't require adjustment unless changing the width of the blade significantly, if at all. (I only adjusted my mill once, it always runs the same blade type so no adjustment required).

                            Guides of course require adjustment for different width and gauge of blades.

                            Once the blade gets dull, it wanders, at that point you have to replace the blade with a sharp one, regardless of which side of the blade the work piece is on.

                            The splitter argument is moot as the splitter is narrower than the blade, if the wood contacts the splitter, the cut will be off.

                            In my experience it always goes back to

                            - proper width blade and tooth configuration
                            - properly tensioned blade (many saws cannot do this)
                            - blade tracking properly adjusted.
                            - proper feed speed.

                            Regards, Rod.

                            P.S. If you can't get your saw cutting properly, try a new blade, I've sent more than one new blade back due to improper sharpening/set, same for poor welds, if your saw is going CLunk......CLunk or even Tick......Tick every time the weld goes past the guides it's not ground accurately.
                            Last edited by Rod Sheridan; 11-10-2017, 08:21 AM. Reason: added post script
                            Randy in Calgary, Egon and like this.
                            Work is the curse of the riding class.

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                            • #15

                              Re: Bandsaw Drift...this can't be real right??

                              Originally posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
                              I wish I had a nickel for every time we discuss bandsaw drift.

                              I use as wide and as coarse a blade as possible for all sawing. I tension it properly.

                              The fence is adjusted parallel to the mitre saw groove, and the blade tracking adjusted so that the blade is centered in the kerf. Note that this shouldn't require adjustment unless changing the width of the blade significantly, if at all. (I only adjusted my mill once, it always runs the same blade type so no adjustment required).

                              Guides of course require adjustment for different width and gauge of blades.

                              Once the blade gets dull, it wanders, at that point you have to replace the blade with a sharp one, regardless of which side of the blade the work piece is on.

                              The splitter argument is moot as the splitter is narrower than the blade, if the wood contacts the splitter, the cut will be off.

                              In my experience it always goes back to

                              - proper width blade and tooth configuration
                              - properly tensioned blade (many saws cannot do this)
                              - blade tracking properly adjusted.
                              - proper feed speed.

                              Regards, Rod.
                              just curious Rod...how do you explain the accuracy of the cut in the video?

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