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How Do I Make This Router Cut?

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  • ShopSweeper
    started a topic How Do I Make This Router Cut?

    How Do I Make This Router Cut?

    Hello,

    I am helping a friend make some small speakers, and he wants me to rout the relief for the speaker in the front panel of the boxes. I assumed it would be a straightforward circular opening and then round inset section, but the speakers he bought are shaped like the attached image. The through hole is round, so that is easy, but the outside frame is like that shown in the image. I have to cut an inset section so the speaker sits flush with the front panel. I have both a regular and plunge base for my router.

    Thanks for your help!

    Sweeps
    Attached Files

  • John Bartley
    replied
    Originally posted by Woodwreck View Post
    Apparently I must be missing something but based on the several pics shown, and my past thoughts, I assumed the flange is simply surface mounted which leaves only a circle to be cut for the speaker itself How did we get to all the additional complicated steps?
    Steve,

    The speaker is not surface mounted. There is a slight recess machined into the soundboard so that the face of the speaker mounting flange sits flush with the soundboard face.

    Leave a comment:


  • Woodwreck
    replied
    Apparently I must be missing something but based on the several pics shown, and my past thoughts, I assumed the flange is simply surface mounted which leaves only a circle to be cut for the speaker itself How did we get to all the additional complicated steps?

    Leave a comment:


  • Wally in Calgary
    replied
    Originally posted by ShopSweeper View Post
    Thanks for all your responses.

    I finally got to see an actual speaker, and the straight looking section in the image is actually slightly curved. He wants an accurate fit, but I'm not sure who accurate I can actually make these cuts. My plan is to make an outline of the actual speaker frame, then build a template from that using separate pieces of Baltic Birch plywood glued together. I'll adjust the dimensions to accommodate the use of a router bit guide bushing. I'll post a picture of the results - if they're any good....

    Sweeps
    I am thinking that speaker is around 5-6" in dia. If so you could cut a hole with a 4" or larger if needed hole saw and then make a template from the speaker with ---THIS ---. Then you take the bushing off and rout out the edge to a perfect fit. I inlaid this tile ( with the set from LV) because someone put a hot pot on the counter and they didn't want to replace all the rest of the counter. Check the fit of it.

    Click image for larger version

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    Leave a comment:


  • John Bartley
    replied
    Originally posted by ShopSweeper View Post
    Thanks for all your responses.

    I finally got to see an actual speaker, and the straight looking section in the image is actually slightly curved. He wants an accurate fit, but I'm not sure who accurate I can actually make these cuts. My plan is to make an outline of the actual speaker frame, then build a template from that using separate pieces of Baltic Birch plywood glued together. I'll adjust the dimensions to accommodate the use of a router bit guide bushing. I'll post a picture of the results - if they're any good....

    Sweeps
    You can leave 1/16" all around the speaker and it will still look just fine, so don't try to make the template too tight. Take your time, shallow cuts, move slow. You'll do fine !!!

    Leave a comment:


  • ShopSweeper
    replied
    Thanks for all your responses.

    I finally got to see an actual speaker, and the straight looking section in the image is actually slightly curved. He wants an accurate fit, but I'm not sure who accurate I can actually make these cuts. My plan is to make an outline of the actual speaker frame, then build a template from that using separate pieces of Baltic Birch plywood glued together. I'll adjust the dimensions to accommodate the use of a router bit guide bushing. I'll post a picture of the results - if they're any good....

    Sweeps

    Leave a comment:


  • bogmer
    replied
    If you are not confident you can cut it with a router then cut the hole big enough for the speaker to fit. Then use a knife lightly go around the entire speaker. Then do a second pass a little heavier and then a third. After that you can use a chisel and drop it down the 1/8 inch or what ever you need to drop it down by and bingo you have a recessed speaker.

    Leave a comment:


  • schor
    replied
    take 1/4" ply screw it (strategically) to a piece of 3/4" ply, screw the speaker down upside down onto this, get a shallow guide and straight cut bit and trace the speaker outline into the 1/4" piece. Use that cutout as a template, adjusting the size of guide to suit clearances you want and set the depth and route it. Hopefully I explained it well enough.

    Leave a comment:


  • Randy in Calgary
    replied
    When I bought my Paisley AE500's in 1982, they were considered pretty high end at $800/pr (a lot of money in 1982). I recall a line from the manual.............

    "A cosmetic grill is provided for those willing to accept the acoustic compromises that it's use creates."

    These are now my shop speakers. Bitchin'!


    . Click image for larger version  Name:	284699-paisley_research_ae500_loudspeakers.jpg Views:	1 Size:	43.0 KB ID:	1208213
    Last edited by Randy in Calgary; 11-08-2018, 05:44 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • John Bartley
    replied
    These speaker holes are cut to be a very close fit and deep enough that the speaker sits just flush with the surface. The reason for this is that sometimes people like to remove the speaker cover (grille cloth) and show just the bare sound board and speakers/ports. here is the front of one of a set of Goodmans Mezzo SL (1970's vintage) that i redid about 10 years ago.

    Click image for larger version

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  • Doug G
    replied
    Is there going to be a cover over the speaker? I would think so otherwise it will look unfinished even if the opening is made perfectly. Assuming there is a cover the opening needs to be wider than the speaker flange and smaller than the cover. No need for it to be exact. Depending on how many you are doing you can just use the speaker as a template, trace the outline on the box and cut it to just outside the line. If you have several to make it may justify a pattern and pattern bit. Don't see how you could follow that outline using the outside of the base as the guide but I could be mistaken and if there is a cover you don't need to be exact. The attached video shows how to do it without a pattern and pattern bit just free hand except if there is a cover you can cut to just outside instead of inside the line. If no cover, then this would be how you would do it treating the speaker like the wooden inlay.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXYC3OGOC5U Hope this helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • iamtooler
    replied
    Originally posted by WoodBob View Post

    I think we are not talking about the same thing. I am talking about routing a square inset area for the speaker so it is flush with the surface. This is what the OP originally had envisioned. The shape of the router base is immaterial. My assumption was another, round hole, would be cut for the speaker cone to go through. What were you talking about?
    I realise I expressed myself poorly. The point is the router will be guided by the outside of it's base for such a small circle. As the base is round it is not difficult to measure the offset (radius) of the base from the speaker that is used as the pattern. The template you will make will probably be big enough that it can be made with a trammel. A pin router would be ideal, they were made for just such jobs.
    Rob

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  • bkrits
    replied
    What do we say, each man has his way of doing something and no ones way is wrong, just something to remember, IMO

    Leave a comment:


  • WoodBob
    replied
    Originally posted by iamtooler View Post

    The router base is round so you still make a square jig to cut the round hole.
    Rob
    I think we are not talking about the same thing. I am talking about routing a square inset area for the speaker so it is flush with the surface. This is what the OP originally had envisioned. The shape of the router base is immaterial. My assumption was another, round hole, would be cut for the speaker cone to go through. What were you talking about?

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusty
    replied
    Making the cut is pretty simple. The question is does it have to be exact to look good. In other words will the speaker be set into the cut and will the cut be visible and therefore will it be necessary to cut clean and precise? If that's the case use the speaker as a pattern to cut a pattern and then reduce the pattern by 1/2 an inch if you use a 1/2 inch cutter and bearing for your final cut. Lots of ways to do it really but generally those speakers are not set in. They fit in a round hole and fasten to the face of your workpiece screwed through the 4 holes.

    Leave a comment:

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