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I need a new wood -- opinions and ideas welcome!

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  • chris44
    replied
    Originally posted by bkrits View Post

    Hi Wayne You seem to be a fan of the Rubio Monocoat, I would like some information not put out by those trying to sell it, I am embarking on a multy wood chest of draws I want to keep the texture of the grain and enhance the colours.
    I read that it is a one coat application question 1 is "can it manage 2 coats and will it look different?
    I see there are lots of other products pushed as in cleaners / restorers have you any experience with these, is it a long term product that dosen't need constant attention?
    I don't want to derail this thread so PM me if necessary or start a new thread.
    Thanks in advance.
    Hi Bob,

    don't want to hijack this thread, so i will post a reply to your Rubio question in the finishes section.

    Cheers
    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • bkrits
    replied
    Originally posted by Wayne View Post
    Have you ever considered quartered white oak. Can look very contemporary, perhaps apply a light 5% white Rubio Monocoat oil rub-on / rub-off. If you have walnut, this combination could work. -Wayne
    Hi Wayne You seem to be a fan of the Rubio Monocoat, I would like some information not put out by those trying to sell it, I am embarking on a multy wood chest of draws I want to keep the texture of the grain and enhance the colours.
    I read that it is a one coat application question 1 is "can it manage 2 coats and will it look different?
    I see there are lots of other products pushed as in cleaners / restorers have you any experience with these, is it a long term product that dosen't need constant attention?
    I don't want to derail this thread so PM me if necessary or start a new thread.
    Thanks in advance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Egon
    replied
    Interesting wood comes in all species. It depends on milled cuts and type of circumstances the tree grew in.

    I like them all. ( looks, feel, smell, workability ). Pine, balsam fir are exspecially attractive to my ollifactory senses.

    Leave a comment:


  • diplodock
    replied
    Originally posted by John Bartley View Post
    One of my favourite wood for strong grain and strong colour is Elm. Unfortunately it can sometimes also look a bit green(ish), but for grain impact ... it's not too bad.
    Red elm is beautiful wood IMHO. It has the contrast of oak and ash, but has a secondary "ghost" grain similar to what hackberry has. It is prone to some movement, but if you let it acclimate before dimensioning it helps alot. I actually planed it, let it acclimate for a couple of days, then dimension to final...no issues. It's a stalky stringy wood that tends for fuzz more than most woods when cut, but it's also very strong.

    Leave a comment:


  • Randydb
    replied
    I love the idea of reclaimed wood. I have worked with spalted birch and maple and you get some incredibly beautiful looks. Also, that beetle killed pine was pretty cool looking. I agree that it could be over the top, but is it ever eye catching.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon kleist
    replied
    If you start your project with rough lumber, Hickory can be very rewarding for a ultra strong and unique look with well placed grains. Plus finishes simpler to oak.

    Leave a comment:


  • redlee
    replied
    Yellow Birch can be very nice.

    Leave a comment:


  • carbonBased
    replied
    Never used elm, but I'd agree that it does have a pretty cool grain. My in laws have some elm furniture and I quite like it.

    I've been told it smells pretty bad when milling it though; true?

    -Jeff

    Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • iamtooler
    replied
    Elm slabs milled this summer. This was a local land mark twin trunk white elm, a great loss. Click image for larger version

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    Click image for larger version

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  • John Bartley
    replied
    One of my favourite wood for strong grain and strong colour is Elm. Unfortunately it can sometimes also look a bit green(ish), but for grain impact ... it's not too bad.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusty
    replied
    I don't think there are many North American hardwoods that would not fall into the realm of red and white Oak, Ash, Maple, Birch, Cherry and Walnut in terms of colours and grain choices. For example Beech and Butternut etc. are very similar to the others. Beyond that you have to get into exotics and that's where I draw the line because of the issues that come with them in terms of allergens and respiratory Problems. The softwoods offer very little choice from Pine to Cedar with Fir in the middle. I think that's the reason stain was invented. If you can make Maple look like Walnut, that to me is enough to demonstrate the possibilities of colour choice.

    Leave a comment:


  • JimPTBO
    replied
    Originally posted by schor View Post
    My favorites are walnut and cherry with birdseye or tiger maple thrown in for contrast. Do not like oak except for floors and regular maple is just to boring.
    Steve, don't forget spalted maple for contrast, one of my favorites! Ditto on the oak and maple with the exception maybe to QS white in certain applications.

    Leave a comment:


  • schor
    replied
    My favorites are walnut and cherry with birdseye or tiger maple thrown in for contrast. Do not like oak except for floors and regular maple is just to boring.

    Leave a comment:


  • nowherebound
    replied
    Thanks all. Some excellent food for thought indeed.

    Also I'd like to try something in ambrosia maple one of these days (though concerned about the yellowing). Maybe not this project but we'll see.

    Leave a comment:


  • JimPTBO
    replied
    Ditto on the cherry if you want to have the wood do the talking. Personally, I would shy away from any maple as it give you yellow tones when aged.

    Ebonized ash works great with what I refer to as "Urban Mission" style. Great wood to mill and work with plus easy on the pocketbook!

    If you want to stay in the red tone and really make it pop go with vertical grain sawn Douglar Fir from your structure; rails stiles etc. Fiddleback Stika Spruce for your inset panels on your gables, doors, shelves etc.

    Fuel for thought? Look forward to seeing the finished product.

    Leave a comment:

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