Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Make room in your shop

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46

    Re: Make room in your shop

    I don't have a track saw. I was wondering if there is anything that can be done with one that could not be done with a circular saw and a straight edge?
    Brian @ Muir, Egon and schor like this.
    Bob just past Ayr

    Comment

    • Thread Continues Below...

    • #47

      Re: Make room in your shop

      Originally posted by schor View Post

      Kodak? lol
      OK, I'm an old fart.

      I remember using a Tektronics Polaroid camera for oscilloscope photographs, you had to put that surface coating on the photographs to preserve them...........What a mess.........Rod.
      KenL likes this.
      Work is the curse of the riding class.

      Comment


      • #48

        Re: Make room in your shop

        Originally posted by Rod Sheridan View Post

        OK, I'm an old fart.

        I remember using a Tektronics Polaroid camera for oscilloscope photographs, you had to put that surface coating on the photographs to preserve them...........What a mess.........Rod.
        I think I'm older but I wont report this as some elder abuse, just watch yourself going forward please.
        Steve The Drill Sergeant
        Check out MyShopNotes on YouTube.

        Comment


        • #49

          Re: Make room in your shop

          Originally posted by Bob just past Ayr View Post
          I don't have a track saw. I was wondering if there is anything that can be done with one that could not be done with a circular saw and a straight edge?
          A circular saw on a quide = tract saw from what I’ve seen.

          I don’t have a Track Saw but there is a fifty year old Skill Saw and a lighter weight Makita that I do use.
          Egon
          from
          The South Shore, Nova Scotia

          Comment


          • #50

            Re: Make room in your shop

            I used a guide and a Rockwell 315 for years in the siding business. To me they are the predecessor of today's track saws.
            "Do it Right!"

            Comment


            • #51

              Re: Make room in your shop

              I'm talking about the width, not the bottom, Rusty. Unless of course you can get a 3/4" wide dado blade set on the arbor of one!

              Originally posted by Rusty View Post

              Not you too Marty?

              As I seem to recall, space is not your problem. As to accuracy i assume you are talking about a flat bottom.[??]
              All the best,

              Marty

              President of Kingston Wood Artisans https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

              Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club

              Comment

              • Thread Continues Below...

              • #52

                Re: Make room in your shop

                Marty I think I can be every bit as accurate as a dado blade with a track saw. Maybe even better if a guy's dado blade or table saw has any runout at the arbor. lol

                Why do you suggest I can't be?

                When and if I need that much precision I use razor blades to set what would normally be pencil marks and then move the track until it touches the razor blade. John Lucas was the first guy I ever saw using a Festool track saw. He frequented a woodworking forum called the "Oak" and a subsequent one called "the wood works." The Oak was started by a guy named Kip. Many years have passed and both men have passed but John used razor blades to position his track. Perhaps you knew him. Regardless just about a year or so before his passing he sold his table saw to prove the point that he didn't need it since he had the track saw. So this was not my idea and i'm certainly not alone in thinking a woodworker does not need a table saw. John was a friend and he posted several tips and tricks he had learned over many years and I still use some of his tips.
                Last edited by Rusty; 02-11-2019, 09:37 AM.
                "Do it Right!"

                Comment


                • #53

                  Re: Make room in your shop

                  Thanks everyone for your input, questions, answers, yea's or nay's. They all add to the discussion.
                  "Do it Right!"

                  Comment


                  • #54

                    Re: Make room in your shop

                    What I would like is a more intelligently designed table saw bed. One that can easily be clamped to. I use my saw as a table when it is not in use. I clamp projects to it for routing. It is always a chore to clamp anything to it since it does not have a flat surface on the bottom. I usually end up putting a 2x4 to level out the bottom so I can clamp effectively. Would be nice if manufacturers acknowledge some of us have small shops and would love a dual purpose tool.

                    Comment


                    • #55

                      Re: Make room in your shop

                      Originally posted by KenL View Post
                      Well, I cannot understand how these discussions go so far sideways sometimes but I will take ownership of some of it; only a small taste though!

                      Rusty said; "Similarly I could cut the itsy bitsy pieces you want to cut on your table saw with my mitersaw or the track saw. Go ahead with an open mind and see if you can't do it too."

                      So, for the record, I will not take him or anyone else up on that challenge since I am happily attached to my digits (I need them to make noise with my various musical instruments among their other uses) and see no need to waste my time devising ways to hold/cut small parts with some other snarling beast when I can use a simple sled and hold down that I already have for my table saw. I do fun things like make balsa sheets into planking for my aeroplanes on the table saw (think about cutting 3/32" x 3/16" x 48" strips) using a 1/32" thin kerf blade (bought for the purpose) with a fitted zero clearance insert and a simple push stick/sled. The material is too expensive to simply convert most of it into saw dust which you would be doing with anything else (other than possibly a band saw but they tend to leave a rather ragged edge which is unsuitable for the purpose), at least IMO. Similarly, when breaking Indian rosewood or other exotics into small parts for tools and toys; it is not obvious to me what advantage a track saw would bring to the endeavour.

                      When I started out, I had a B&D sabre saw with some jigs and fixtures that did all of my cutting. It got the job done but was a real nuisance and a time sink. I had some fixtures that enabled the use of a circular saw with a B&D Workmate that improved the accuracy of cutting with that tool but that too left a lot of inaccuracy and precipitated a whole lot of inventing and fabricating contraptions to hold things still. Even after all that, the things were only useful for big pieces and, at that, it is much easier to set the fence and use a mitre gauge on a table saw for the majority of straight cuts especially as dimensions of the parts decrease. I have a mitre saw too and it certainly has its uses but not for tiny toy, tool or model parts; too crude a weapon! Really, for one-of items, I use hand tools (my favourite way), the scroll saw, or occasionally the band saw, to shape most small parts. When I have multiple parts to make and where repeatability is a factor (such as my birdhouse logs), I then expend the time and effort to make jigs for the table saw or whatever is best suited (in my opinion, based on my experience) to do the operation.

                      I did not suggest that I could not use a track saw for my small work; I said I would not for reasons of economy of materials and time; safety too.

                      Some further thoughts on the subject

                      Ken

                      Kenneth I very much appreciate your input here. I hope you understand I have not meant anything negatively or of a confrontational nature with you at all. I was using your input as examples only. In fact I agree with much of what you said. I started this topic for discussion only. That's why I said up front that I'm not getting rid of my UNISAW either. The track saw is slower. No doubt about that at all. We are good my fiend!!

                      This thread is not about being right or wrong or imposing my position on anyone either. Members here raised issue in favour of the TS and I agree most definitely with many of them. I'm on the table saw side of this discussion. The table saw certainly has many advantages over a track saw. BUT,,,,,,, since it is my thread and I asked the question, what good could it possibly do if I did not answer for the position I suggested.. I'm not arguing with anyone. Yes it's slower and more difficult to setup in some operations but it's not impossible and it most definitely is SAFER! That fact alone may make a big impression on those of us who fear losing a finger to a table saw. I forget exactly who it was on this forum recently who feared his jointer for edging a board. It doesn't matter who it was but I'm betting he knows he can prepare the edges of his work with a track saw now. If this thread has helped anyone allay their fears of the TS then it's good thread.

                      As long as we have these discussions there will be differences of opinions. If we all understand and accepted that there would be a lot of peace on this planet. Enjoy!
                      Doug G and KenL like this.
                      "Do it Right!"

                      Comment


                      • #56

                        Re: Make room in your shop

                        Originally posted by WoodBob View Post
                        What I would like is a more intelligently designed table saw bed. One that can easily be clamped to. I use my saw as a table when it is not in use. I clamp projects to it for routing. It is always a chore to clamp anything to it since it does not have a flat surface on the bottom. I usually end up putting a 2x4 to level out the bottom so I can clamp effectively. Would be nice if manufacturers acknowledge some of us have small shops and would love a dual purpose tool.
                        My bandsaw Table has several wood blocks glued to the under side just for clamping.
                        Egon
                        from
                        The South Shore, Nova Scotia

                        Comment

                        • Thread Continues Below...

                        • #57

                          Re: Make room in your shop

                          I have added wood frames under the extension side tables on my saw but before I added those side extensions I had solid wood blocks that were slotted to fit over the ribs in the casting of the table top. They worked well until i added a new fence and my clamps wouldn't work anymore because the new rail was too wide.
                          "Do it Right!"

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X