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Repairing a Cello

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  • #16

    Re: Repairing a Cello

    Originally posted by Andre in Quebec View Post
    The '' dowel '' is the sound post.

    It is set between the top and the back & it's placement can affect the sound pretty much.You'll have to play a bit with it in order to get the best sound the cello can produce.

    Ideally u should put it back at the same spots , quite easy for the back but not so much for the top.

    I've posted some pics above about the tool that is used to place the post back & yes it is done through the ''F'' holes.
    Yeah lol I saw after I did some research that you called it above. Thanks! I got a special tool only sold on ebay that I saw in a video on placing that sound post. Seems like it makes it really easy to put it back.

    BTW: I do not play at all. I could move the bow across but I wouldn't be able to tell if it is set up properly or not.

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    • #17

      Re: Repairing a Cello

      Good news! It looks like my glue repair has done well. The foot post is near straight now. I just finished gluing my lamination piece. I'll let it set until tomorrow since I don't have the hide glue yet anyway. Going to have a party tomorrow but if I have time I'll glue the top on. If not, I'll glue it Sunday. I've seen on some sites where you let the top sit for 2 days before removing the clamps. I think I might also try the rubber hose thing instead of making all those clamps. I'll use the clamps I have and see where that gets me and have the rubber on standby. I actually have a decent amount of clamps if I break out all of my bar clamps. For a one-time repair like this it should work fine.

      I posted on a luthier forum too and they reemed me said I ruined the Cello. Not sure how but my guess is they saw the "dewalt" clamps and couldn't see past that. Sorry but I just can't see buying $500 worth of luthier tools for a $300 Cello. Also can't see paying a "real" luthier $1000 to fix a $300 Cello. This is an exercise to gain experience.
      Last edited by WoodBob; 05-31-2019, 07:49 AM.

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      • #18

        Re: Repairing a Cello

        Originally posted by WoodBob View Post
        Good news! It looks like my glue repair has done well. The foot post is near straight now. I just finished gluing my lamination piece. I'll let it set until tomorrow since I don't have the hide glue yet anyway. Going to have a party tomorrow but if I have time I'll glue the top on. If not, I'll glue it Sunday. I've seen on some sites where you let the top sit for 2 days before removing the clamps. I think I might also try the rubber hose thing instead of making all those clamps. I'll use the clamps I have and see where that gets me and have the rubber on standby. I actually have a decent amount of clamps if I break out all of my bar clamps. For a one-time repair like this it should work fine.

        I posted on a luthier forum too and they reemed me said I ruined the Cello. Not sure how but my guess is they saw the "dewalt" clamps and couldn't see past that. Sorry but I just can't see buying $500 worth of luthier tools for a $300 Cello. Also can't see paying a "real" luthier $1000 to fix a $300 Cello. This is an exercise to gain experience.
        Good on ya' Bob!! It looks like you're well on the way to a successful repair. I have also visited those luthier forums, being of possession of a couple of guitars that need some repair. Many of those people are decent .... some of them are a bit "nose in the air" about us rednecks pretending to repair musical instruments .

        cheers eh !

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        • #19

          Re: Repairing a Cello

          You don't need much pressure to glue the top on ribs esecially if the old glue has been cleaned a bit on both top & ribs , the surgical tubing would do a better job & would let you reposition as necessary.
          KenL likes this.

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          • #20

            Re: Repairing a Cello

            I think that you've got the old fellow back in pretty good shape. I sometimes repair my guitars and sometimes I get it done where they are better equipped. I had the neck on my 1956 SS Stewart arch-top reseated and cold-pressed by a luthier for example. It cost quite a bit (approx $600) and might not have been worth the money if that were the only consideration. It was my father's pride and joy, I started to learn on it and I inherited it when he passed away so there is quite a connection. Besides, it was a custom piece and is nearly as old as I am. SOME things are just like that; for me anyway.

            Thanks for sharing the repair with us.

            Ken

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            • #21

              Re: Repairing a Cello

              Originally posted by WoodBob View Post
              Good news! It looks like my glue repair has done well. The foot post is near straight now. I just finished gluing my lamination piece. I'll let it set until tomorrow since I don't have the hide glue yet anyway. Going to have a party tomorrow but if I have time I'll glue the top on. If not, I'll glue it Sunday. I've seen on some sites where you let the top sit for 2 days before removing the clamps. I think I might also try the rubber hose thing instead of making all those clamps. I'll use the clamps I have and see where that gets me and have the rubber on standby. I actually have a decent amount of clamps if I break out all of my bar clamps. For a one-time repair like this it should work fine.

              I posted on a luthier forum too and they reemed me said I ruined the Cello. Not sure how but my guess is they saw the "dewalt" clamps and couldn't see past that. Sorry but I just can't see buying $500 worth of luthier tools for a $300 Cello. Also can't see paying a "real" luthier $1000 to fix a $300 Cello. This is an exercise to gain experience.
              I know nothing about what you are doing but have seen a few things as in the guy who is building an acoustic guitar on here, your cello looks like a cheapo (as I say I know nothing) so for you to gain the experience and the satisfaction of having a go is worth much more than the money value, I like you attitude to this repair, Good on you.

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              • #22

                Re: Repairing a Cello

                I have been warned off of hide glue for a Cello due to it's extremely short working time. Like under a minute (unless heated a lot). It has been suggested to use regular Titebond glue. I was told Titebond is use frequently for instruments and that unlike Titebond II the joint will be removable for future repairs. Can anyone attest to that?

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                • #23

                  Re: Repairing a Cello

                  I have had no success getting Titebond to adhere to anything that has a coating of hide glue on it; old chairs and furniture just fail in the same place and I find the Titebond to be nice and shiny where the joint fails which means that it coated the hide glue but did not adhere to it. I cannot see why Titebond would not work on an instrument just fine but your repair might encounter the problem that I had.

                  Ken

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                  • #24

                    Re: Repairing a Cello

                    I've heard that one advantage of hide glue is that it can be reactivated and so new hide glue will bond with old hide glue while other glues like Titebond will not. Check out this webpage for some hints on extending the open time of hide glue. https://www.gnhw.org/qaarchive/open-time-hide-glue Note I'm not speaking from a breadth of knowledge I've only used hide glue once on a veneered table repair, which was successful.

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                    • #25

                      Re: Repairing a Cello

                      Just did the glue-up! Hopefully works out!

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                      • #26

                        Re: Repairing a Cello

                        Which glue???

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                        • #27

                          Re: Repairing a Cello

                          Originally posted by Doug G View Post
                          Which glue???
                          I ended up using regular (original) Titebond.

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                          • #28

                            Re: Repairing a Cello

                            Looking good, do let us know how it sounds??

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                            • #29

                              Re: Repairing a Cello

                              I managed to get the sound post in and restring and put the Cello back together. It took a good hour to tune it. The bottom is holding well but the piece of wood that goes in the bottom where the post/stand comes out of is just a friction fit. So it actually seems to need to settle in before it will stop moving. I seated it best I could but it still ends up at a slight angle. I'll tell you that piece is under a lot of stress I am surprised more Cello's don't break at that point. You can see in the below pics what I am talking about. I tried playing it and it sounds pretty good - smooth, tone is good. With these new strings I am hoping it will stay in tune we'll see. Also if that bottom piece doesn't stop moving the Cello will also never stay in tune. It is perfectly tuned now I'll check it every hour and see.

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                              • #30

                                Re: Repairing a Cello

                                Great thread! Thanks for posting. Too bad you're not closer, my 9 year old has been learning cello for the last 2 years on a loaner, i'd love to give him his own.

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