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Projects for 8 to 12-year-olds

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  • #16

    Re: Projects for 8 to 12-year-olds

    8 to 12 year olds , I would be a little nervous with 10 of them around power tools. Best to keep it to hand tools. Tea light candle holders would be a simple one day project they can gift to mom. . You can make them as simple or complex as you think can be handled in a day. Search google images for " wooden tea light candle holder"

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    • #17

      Re: Projects for 8 to 12-year-olds

      That book is a good one. I have built a few projects with my 3 1/2 year old. I have videos of him driving in nails like a carpenter and drilling holes better than a lot of adults.

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      • #18

        Re: Projects for 8 to 12-year-olds

        Mine are 7 and 9 and everything requires one-on-one instruction and my complete attention/supervision. My tools are older and exposed belts are everywhere. Don't underestimate the curiosity of kids at this age and their willingness to just stick their hand in there or poke something moving with a stick. Also, don't forget about kid-sized PPE.

        My two have each made a canoe paddle this year with a lot of help. We started with rough maple boards that we (I) ran through the jointer and planer. We cut to the line on the bandsaw (holding the wood together) and they used my set of LV spokeshaves to work their way down to a respectable paddle. Prior to this, they've helped me build a shed, birdhouses and various other projects. They are really good at sanding ;)

        We're making patterned cutting boards as teacher presents this year. It will take us multiple days with all the glue-ups but I'll post how it goes.
        KenL, djnelson and iamtooler like this.
        ---
        Randy

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        • #19

          Re: Projects for 8 to 12-year-olds

          I run a woodworking course. A hand tools and basic machinery. They are two separate courses. The handtools course I find the students most appreciate.

          project one is using a Hand saw to cut Janga Three pieces each and they all have to be sanded so a baby can play with them (4.5h) I raffle it off in the end(week6). So some lucky student gets it.

          project two to make a taper mortice and tenon mallet
          Work in partners with a handsaw to rip 18 inch handle on a angle. Hand plane and shape. (4.5h)
          Cut mallet head to length in shape with hand planes, spokeshaves and sandpaper. (4.5h)
          Brace and bit drill holes in mallet head, hand chisel, Rasp and file to fit handle. (9h)
          finish assembly and hand wax. (4.5h)

          project three is building a tool tote from Pine to fit the mallet. (15 h) with about six hours of homework.

          it is a 42 hour course. Measurement in imperial and metric are very important.

          The classroom is open five hours a day nine days but students are allowed to leave after two hour morning and two hour afternoon and students are given a 10 minute break mid morning and mid afternoon.
          Last edited by Matt Matt; 06-13-2019, 12:52 AM.
          For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
          Sir Isaac Newton.

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          • #20

            Re: Projects for 8 to 12-year-olds

            thank you everyone . the day was great . they made a nail with the black smith and a cheese board in the wood shop .
            KenL, djnelson and 2 others like this.
            everyone knows real machines are 3 phase. Founding member of the Wadkin blockhead club

            jack
            English machines

            http://www.youtube.com/user/tool613

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            • #21

              Re: Projects for 8 to 12-year-olds

              I found an old boat kit in the shop

              Click image for larger version

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              KenL and jgarrett forsberg like this.
              When someone tells you it can't be done, it's a reflection of their limitations, not yours.

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