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  • #31

    Re: Labor intensive fence

    Keep us informed Sasha.

    Some guys here have motors they would probably sell. Maybe post the numbers on your motor and see what the guys can come up with.

    i thought Mike at Buck Lake had one recently.
    "Do it Right!"

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    • #32

      Re: Labor intensive fence

      Click image for larger version

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ID:	1250641 Unfortunately I’ve run into the same problem. After 20 minutes of cutting the motor overheats and kicks out. So I called and Leeson Canada has no 3hp motors so it’s going to come from the states. The funny thing is a 4hp motor is only $40 more. So I have a question about the starter switch. Is it maxed out at 3hp or what does the sticker mean? I Googled it but I can’t make heads or tails of the website. I don’t need 4hp but who doesn’t like more power? I’m going into the city to put a deposit on a motor so they’ll order one for me. I’m doing this on my phone so I apologize for perhaps crappy pictures. It’s IP66 in case you can’t read the numbers.Click image for larger version

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      • #33

        Re: Labor intensive fence

        Have you used an amp reading meter on it?
        If the switch says 3hp it is presumably 15 amp max, I prefer switches with amp ratings, it is a sign of quality. The motor is tripping it's internal reset klixon? Over heating if not due to load is normally due to under voltage, have you monitored it under load?
        Rob
        Last edited by iamtooler; 09-11-2019, 10:49 AM.

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        • #34

          Re: Labor intensive fence

          I only have a basic circuit tester because I’m really inexperienced with electrical stuff. I did some more research and I’m pretty sure the switch is stock. As well, the guy at James Electric looked and he was pretty sure the switch isn’t the problem. Either way I’m sticking with a 3hp motor to keep things simple and I’ll have them look at the problem motor when the new one comes in. I’ll do a bit of cutting and then some gluing and clamping to prevent the overheating.

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          • #35

            Re: Labor intensive fence

            There are alot of reasons why a motor will overheat, but most can be attributed to a limited # of reasons.

            1. Not enough cooling air, even air over closed motors need lots of air, if it is an open motor check saw dust and chips aren't clogging it up.
            2. Few voltages are accurate to the suppliers claimed voltage rate, they vary within an acceptable range, to high or to low can overheat motors.
            3. Here's one that might apply to you, I think your in the foothills of the Rockies, elevations over 1000 M can overheat normal motors
            and shorten there life, you need to bring this to the attention of your supplier if that is the case.
            4. And finally if your motor has overheated many times your winding insulation is probably compromised, and it will continue to overheat till it burns out. Rewinding it nowadays will cost you as much as a new motor.
            Last edited by Carlosinthesticks; 09-11-2019, 06:41 PM. Reason: Darn spelling.
            Wally in Calgary likes this.

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            • #36

              Re: Labor intensive fence

              I’m not sure how power supply can be the issue. It’s a factory cord plugged into a 15 amp circuit. It’s all new wiring in the shop. The motor is 14 amps so unless I’m mistaken that’s fine. Or does the motor draw more than 14 amps under load? I’m the same elevation as Calgary, 1000 feet give or take a few.

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              • #37

                Re: Labor intensive fence

                Originally posted by Sasha g View Post
                I’m not sure how power supply can be the issue. It’s a factory cord plugged into a 15 amp circuit. It’s all new wiring in the shop. The motor is 14 amps so unless I’m mistaken that’s fine. Or does the motor draw more than 14 amps under load? I’m the same elevation as Calgary, 1000 feet give or take a few.
                It is called voltage drop and until you have measured voltage at the motor leads under load there is little point proceeding.

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                • #38

                  Re: Labor intensive fence

                  Just curious if you could use a smaller diameter blade?

                  You could remove the motor and have it tested. Then you would know what is happening.
                  Egon
                  from
                  The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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                  • #39

                    Re: Labor intensive fence

                    Originally posted by Egon View Post
                    Just curious if you could use a smaller diameter blade?

                    You could remove the motor and have it tested. Then you would know what is happening.
                    If it is a power supply issue it will not be apparent elsewhere and a new motor will do the same. I think you can get a multi-meter cheap at Canadian Tire when on special.

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                    • #40

                      Re: Labor intensive fence

                      Originally posted by Sasha g View Post
                      I’I'm the same elevation as Calgary, 1000 feet give or take a few.
                      You can eliminate elevation, I am the same as you 1000', well below 3281'. Never had a problem.

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                      • #41

                        Re: Labor intensive fence

                        I had to adapt an extension cord to make it work but I plugged it into a 30 amp circuit and same thing. And on a new note the motor has begun vibrating noticeably but especially as it slows to a stop. It wouldn’t surprise me if the same bearing in the motor is damaged by whatever caused the original problem. I’m not using the saw anymore so I might take the motor in and let them look at it. A new one is on the way. I’ll grab a multimeter and try and educate myself a bit too.

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                        • #42

                          Re: Labor intensive fence

                          Originally posted by Sasha g View Post
                          I had to adapt an extension cord to make it work but I plugged it into a 30 amp circuit and same thing. And on a new note the motor has begun vibrating noticeably but especially as it slows to a stop. It wouldn’t surprise me if the same bearing in the motor is damaged by whatever caused the original problem. I’m not using the saw anymore so I might take the motor in and let them look at it. A new one is on the way. I’ll grab a multimeter and try and educate myself a bit too.
                          I think you have found your problem. Bad bearings will certainly heat the motor up. Sounds like the arbor or shaft is compromised.
                          "Do it Right!"

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                          • #43

                            Re: Labor intensive fence

                            Originally posted by Sasha g View Post
                            I had to adapt an extension cord to make it work but I plugged it into a 30 amp circuit and same thing. And on a new note the motor has begun vibrating noticeably but especially as it slows to a stop. It wouldn’t surprise me if the same bearing in the motor is damaged by whatever caused the original problem. I’m not using the saw anymore so I might take the motor in and let them look at it. A new one is on the way. I’ll grab a multimeter and try and educate myself a bit too.
                            If you want to drop by we can check the motor here Sasha. It's on your route anyways --LOL.

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                            • #44

                              Re: Labor intensive fence

                              I agree with Rusty if the bearings are shot, they have to be changed. But unless the bearings are old what caused the bearings to go? The problem could be cumulative. Voltage at your panel should be within 3% of what the utility claims , if it is not call the utility. But that is not the end of it. For reasonable wall wiring runs, plus the length of your machine cord, voltage drop is with in requirements, also within another 3% and should not effect the operation of your motor. However if your wall wiring runs, added to the length of machine cord, and maybe an added extension cord, are excessive, say 100', your voltage drop could be 10% total and that is to high. The high voltage drop say 10% will cause the amps to go up by 10%. If the running amps go up by 10% the motor will overheat. If the motor overheats it will eventually damage the insulation which will cause a further voltage drop. Overheating eventually kills the bearings by frying the grease.

                              Edit I keep thinking: The size of your conductors also affect voltage drop, If you have a long conductor run, going with a larger wire guage than required in the electrical code could reduce voltage drop to an acceptable level.
                              Last edited by Carlosinthesticks; 09-13-2019, 01:27 PM.

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