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Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

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  • Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

    Hi everyone, so today I was clearing out some bush on the jobsite and seen quite a few trees that I think are hops hornbeams. I've been wanted to get one ever since I've learned about the species. The trees don't look like any full tree pictures I've seen on google but bark and leaves seem to be a match.

    These trees I knocked down seem tall (40-60ft) and straight for a hornbeam but its was somewhat old growth and everything was a telephone pole with leaves just at the top. I tried denting some of the wood just under the bark with a finger nail and it was alot harder than the heartwood of a red oak I knocked down. Also the trees don't flex at all, sure seem really hard.
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  • #2

    Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

    Originally posted by Beaverfever1988 View Post
    Hi everyone, so today I was clearing out some bush on the jobsite and seen quite a few trees that I think are hops hornbeams. I've been wanted to get one ever since I've learned about the species. The trees don't look like any full tree pictures I've seen on google but bark and leaves seem to be a match.

    These trees I knocked down seem tall (40-60ft) and straight for a hornbeam but its was somewhat old growth and everything was a telephone pole with leaves just at the top. I tried denting some of the wood just under the bark with a finger nail and it was alot harder than the heartwood of a red oak I knocked down. Also the trees don't flex at all, sure seem really hard.
    Jason:

    based on photos above my guess would be Ostrya virginiana (ironwood).
    Beaverfever1988 likes this.

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    • #3

      Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

      Also known as lever wood or...hop hornbeam! That is a fantastic piece of ironwood! It makes superb fire wood but that would be a shame.
      Beaverfever1988 likes this.

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      • #4

        Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

        Awesome thanks for the responses guys. I wasn't quite sure as I've only seen a few and they were a bit different.

        I got pretty excited when I seen this tree as it's about 12-14" diameter while all the others were 6-8". I mostly wanted it for making wooden hammers but maybe I can get big enough pieces for something else.

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        • #5

          Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

          Yes I would call that Hop Hornbeam, at 14” that is a large one, at my son’s in Kanata he has hundreds of them on his property, most are in the 6” to 8”, he has also a few Hornbeam which also goes with the Ironwood moniker or muscle wood name.

          As these trees are growing in a bush next to each other they go straight up also the Elm and Ash and Maple and Linden trees, where he is cutting out the dead and dying Elm and a
          Ash trees, and planting Black Walnut and Butternut and some others to replace the lost ones,though it will take many years before they are up there.

          Here a picture of the Hornbeam and the Hop Hornbeam on his property.

          I have turned some of the Hop Hornbeam, just plain wood and easy to work, that wood was from a dead standing tree, the plate is about 12” and had been infected by bugs.

          Click image for larger version

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          Have fun and take care
          Leo Van Der Loo

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          • #6

            Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

            Generally considered a weed Tree Old specimens Hollow for me inside out .The wood is rather bland and generally grows in a spiral and so was unstable. High shrinkage from green to dry . Very susceptible to degrading . I have Some planks 20 inches wide which aren’t that great. I’ve seen larger trees that turn to grow close to Rock soil
            beachburl likes this.
            everyone knows real machines are 3 phase. Founding member of the Wadkin blockhead club

            jack
            English machines

            http://www.youtube.com/user/tool613

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            • #7

              Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

              Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
              Also known as lever wood or...hop hornbeam! That is a fantastic piece of ironwood! It makes superb fire wood but that would be a shame.
              ...thanks for providing info on « common names » used for this species. Hard to keep track of all terms, particularly when operating is a second language.

              salut,

              J.

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              • #8

                Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

                Originally posted by Leo Van Der Loo View Post
                Yes I would call that Hop Hornbeam, at 14” that is a large one, at my son’s in Kanata he has hundreds of them on his property, most are in the 6” to 8”, he has also a few Hornbeam which also goes with the Ironwood moniker or muscle wood name.

                As these trees are growing in a bush next to each other they go straight up also the Elm and Ash and Maple and Linden trees, where he is cutting out the dead and dying Elm and a
                Ash trees, and planting Black Walnut and Butternut and some others to replace the lost ones,though it will take many years before they are up there.

                Here a picture of the Hornbeam and the Hop Hornbeam on his property.

                I have turned some of the Hop Hornbeam, just plain wood and easy to work, that wood was from a dead standing tree, the plate is about 12” and had been infected by bugs.

                Click image for larger version

Name:	Hop Hornbeam.jpg
Views:	103
Size:	37.5 KB
ID:	1250411

                Click image for larger version

Name:	hornbeam & Hophornbeam.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	105.6 KB
ID:	1250409
                Click image for larger version

Name:	Hophormbeam.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	115.9 KB
ID:	1250410
                Nice looking plate Leo! I got a piece of it home today, heavy! It's smaller than I thought, measures as a 10x12" oval. It was wider at the base but wasn't accessible.

                Will I be able to let it dry out as a whole log or should I cut it up? I painted the ends to seal it.

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

                  Originally posted by jgarrett forsberg View Post
                  Generally considered a weed Tree Old specimens Hollow for me inside out .The wood is rather bland and generally grows in a spiral and so was unstable. High shrinkage from green to dry . Very susceptible to degrading . I have Some planks 20 inches wide which aren’t that great. I’ve seen larger trees that turn to grow close to Rock soil
                  Those are some big planks! Ya I've read alot about how they are very susceptible to rot. Too bad its not a very stable wood. Hopefully what I got will be good for anything I do.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

                    Originally posted by Beaverfever1988 View Post

                    Nice looking plate Leo! I got a piece of it home today, heavy! It's smaller than I thought, measures as a 10x12" oval. It was wider at the base but wasn't accessible.

                    Will I be able to let it dry out as a whole log or should I cut it up? I painted the ends to seal it.
                    Jason I have a piece sitting here that I did not get to when still wet/green, I was lucky that it split with just one split from the outside to the center, I ran it through the bandsaw and have now 2 pieces, if you want to turn it I would rough turn whatever you want to make and let it dry after, or turn it to the finished shape and thickness.

                    Just letting it sit will have it split for sure, and it may develop several splits, rather than just one as what happened with mine here.

                    If making boards, do it now, sticker and weight it down and let dry.

                    Have fun and take care
                    Leo Van Der Loo

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                    • #11

                      Re: Is this a Hops Hornbeam tree?

                      Thanks for the info Leo! Hopefully its fine till the weekend. Guess I better figure exactly what I want out of it before i cut it up haha.

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