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Reactionary wood - can anything be done?

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  • Kunzwerks
    replied
    Originally posted by bkrits View Post
    That concave piece put on the hinge side would pull in with the hinges, I am presuming they are on butt hinges if they are on the euro style of hinge it may put too much strain on the hinge those hinges like to work on straight doors.
    Nicely done getting them straight.
    Thanks, Bob. The stiles and rails are actually for sliding doors. So no hinges. Still waiting and watching if they move. If my effort doesn’t turn out, I’ll be making new ones. So far, so good.

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  • bkrits
    replied
    That concave piece put on the hinge side would pull in with the hinges, I am presuming they are on butt hinges if they are on the euro style of hinge it may put too much strain on the hinge those hinges like to work on straight doors.
    Nicely done getting them straight.

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  • Kunzwerks
    replied
    All good suggestions .. thanks. I gave some thought to all the suggestions. Applying heat as beaverfever1988 mentioned is interesting, but a heat gun is probably not going to work as more heat is needed, as in steaming the pieces and bending them straight. I’m not set up for steaming or vacuum press, but I think that would work, especially if placed flat in a vacuum bag after being steamed.

    The other thought was re-cutting the pieces and gluing them back together as Don Kondra mentioned. That got me thinking if I’m losing width on the cut, why not just try to make the cut concave pieces straight. I’d lose width again, but I was interested in the challenge. The result turned out better than hoped. Notice that the pair on the right actually went slightly convex on me, but the other pairs are fine. The thin strips on the right is the convex side cut offs. Let’s just hope the pieces don’t move on me. Good suggestion to wait a couple of days.

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  • bkrits
    replied
    Originally posted by iamtooler View Post

    This is pretty much my point about wetting the concave side to see if moisture is the cause. Reaction wood usually reacts in more than one plane in my experience. I was certainly not recommending using unstable wood for door components. By the same token it is best practice to leave door components around for a few days before making the door in case any pieces are rogues.
    Rob
    Yes I couldn't agree more, one half of what Kunzwerks has ripped could react more than the other half, and buying more wood could bring the same result.
    My comments above were just a general observation that I thought others may find interesting, thanks for your comments
    I still wonder are these doors to be painted, they could be laminated so the joint is on the edge and not the face of the door then they would remain stable.

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    Originally posted by bkrits View Post
    Just an interesting study.
    I have vacuum pressed many pieces of wood, as in panels and timber laminated, so the table I use is always flat and the material placed directly upon it over the top is a breather material to allow an escape for the air so there is no air trapped inside the vacuum bag, all the air is sucked out of the bag so no air I assume means no moisture, because I use epoxy glue the vacuum bag stays under pressure for at least 6 hours most often over night so maybe 12 hours that is a long time to suck every bit of air from every cell of the wood and can we assume every bit of moisture.
    Now what happens when I turn off the vacuum ? we can only guess, but I know that very often what I take out of the bag is bent always concave side down, I used to panic, now I take it all out of the bag and let it stand for a few minuets and what do you know it is straight again.
    I can only guess what is going on with those tiny cell voids in the wood millions of them as the air re-enters them and so the moisture, and we all know what happens when we leave a plank of wood out on the grass in the sun.
    So when we rip a piece of wood in half the moisture content is suddenly different on both sides of the wood, old wood is more stable generally than new wood.
    Now with all that said I have seen wood just get worse the longer it stands, 2 laminates is good for stability but 3 or more is the best.
    Good luck with the doors.
    This is pretty much my point about wetting the concave side to see if moisture is the cause. Reaction wood usually reacts in more than one plane in my experience. I was certainly not recommending using unstable wood for door components. By the same token it is best practice to leave door components around for a few days before making the door in case any pieces are rogues.
    Rob

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  • bkrits
    replied
    Just an interesting study.
    I have vacuum pressed many pieces of wood, as in panels and timber laminated, so the table I use is always flat and the material placed directly upon it over the top is a breather material to allow an escape for the air so there is no air trapped inside the vacuum bag, all the air is sucked out of the bag so no air I assume means no moisture, because I use epoxy glue the vacuum bag stays under pressure for at least 6 hours most often over night so maybe 12 hours that is a long time to suck every bit of air from every cell of the wood and can we assume every bit of moisture.
    Now what happens when I turn off the vacuum ? we can only guess, but I know that very often what I take out of the bag is bent always concave side down, I used to panic, now I take it all out of the bag and let it stand for a few minuets and what do you know it is straight again.
    I can only guess what is going on with those tiny cell voids in the wood millions of them as the air re-enters them and so the moisture, and we all know what happens when we leave a plank of wood out on the grass in the sun.
    So when we rip a piece of wood in half the moisture content is suddenly different on both sides of the wood, old wood is more stable generally than new wood.
    Now with all that said I have seen wood just get worse the longer it stands, 2 laminates is good for stability but 3 or more is the best.
    Good luck with the doors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beaverfever1988
    replied
    Recently I was researching how to make bows, one trick alot of guys were doing was heat treating it under tension with a heat gun to fine tune the wood.

    For your application I think new wood is the best idea. Good luck with your cabinets.

    Leave a comment:


  • nnieman
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian @ Muir View Post
    As someone who builds a few doors I would start over with a new board. Kitchen cabinet doors are probably the most visible bit of work in a house. I use a lot of hard maple and every blue moon I come across a board that looks great until you make that first rip and it ends up in the scrap pile

    Brian
    Agreed.
    Buy new wood.

    Unless you like callbacks don't bother using wood you know isn't stable for cabinet doors.

    Nathan

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  • Egon
    replied
    That’ll work.

    On the same principle the pieces could be aligned to cancel out the bend & glued into a wider board that is then cut into strips.
    Last edited by Egon; 10-08-2019, 08:14 AM.

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  • Don Kondra
    replied
    Make another cut down the center and glue the two pieces back together on a flat surface such as a workbench.

    I call it reverse bent lamination

    Cheers, Don

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  • Brian @ Muir
    replied
    As someone who builds a few doors I would start over with a new board. Kitchen cabinet doors are probably the most visible bit of work in a house. I use a lot of hard maple and every blue moon I come across a board that looks great until you make that first rip and it ends up in the scrap pile

    Brian

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    It does not look to be very severe. Try wetting the concave side to see if it straightens by itself over a day or two.

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  • bkrits
    replied
    Originally posted by Kunzwerks View Post
    yup, those are for door stiles and rails on a cabinet.
    What is the chance the rails on a cabinet will be straightened be the other components, if they are cut shorter the bow will be less.
    For door stiles, is the back of the door seen or is it painted? you could take a cut out of the back of the stile then put it under tension and glue a piece in the saw cut, or put the bent stile on the hinge side the hinges will pull it straight, have you got enough thickness to surface plane the bow out.
    You could try leaving it a few days under tension and see if it comes right.

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  • Kunzwerks
    replied
    Originally posted by bkrits View Post
    What are you using it for? The only time I can see you needing totally straight stock is for door stiles.
    yup, those are for door stiles and rails on a cabinet.

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  • bkrits
    replied
    What are you using it for? The only time I can see you needing totally straight stock is for door stiles.

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