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  • timberframe
    replied
    Originally posted by wbrent View Post
    One more drill bit question. For those who are using drill bits to clear out mortises. If you have a 2” mortise to cut are you using a 2” drill bit or say a 1” drill bit and cutting twice the holes. I can’t find a 2” drill bit.
    You certainly can go either way. I would be inclined to try something the same size as the mortise, perhaps a 16th smaller.

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  • wbrent
    replied
    One more drill bit question. For those who are using drill bits to clear out mortises. If you have a 2” mortise to cut are you using a 2” drill bit or say a 1” drill bit and cutting twice the holes. I can’t find a 2” drill bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • iamtooler
    replied
    Here is a rare tilting beam drill;https://www.lespac.com/en/beauharnoi...nt=BTN_Details

    245 dollars, too heavy to ship by mail. I could Potter if anybody wants it.

    Leave a comment:


  • timberframe
    replied
    Originally posted by wbrent View Post
    What about the pins or pegs. I suppose I could just buy hardwood dowel. Or turn my own. Looks like some are whittled? Is the draw bore techniques always employed? Any recommendations for a good whittling knife. At least to taper the ends.
    Dowel is usually undersized but can be ok if it's not really important. Draw boring is a good idea and you can just sharpen your pegs with your chisel.

    Leave a comment:


  • wbrent
    replied
    What about the pins or pegs. I suppose I could just buy hardwood dowel. Or turn my own. Looks like some are whittled? Is the draw bore techniques always employed? Any recommendations for a good whittling knife. At least to taper the ends.

    Leave a comment:


  • nnieman
    replied
    Originally posted by wbrent View Post
    I want to try my hand at timber framing this winter but don’t want to break the bank on tools. Right now I’m looking for two items. A couple of spiral drill bits. Large ones. 1 1/4” and 1 1/2” diameter Long enough to go through 6-8” beams. Also one or two matching mortise chisels to match. If there is such a thing. Anyone know where I can source such a thing? New or used. What else would you consider a must have for timber framing. And where would you source it.
    I'm not a timber framer but I have done a bit of it.
    I am using drill bits from a brace and bit - I cut the diamond shaped ends off and chuck them in a drill.
    Not as good as the wood owl bits but would work for practicing.

    I have a few old chisels from ebay/flea markets and 1 robert sorby from lee valley.
    I would recommend just buying the new one and not farting around cleaning old chisels.
    Unless you like cleaning old tools then go for it.


    https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...ortise-chisels


    https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...raming-chisels

    Nathan

    Leave a comment:


  • timberframe
    replied
    Originally posted by iamtooler View Post

    I had always heard that boxed heart was inferior timber?
    The best is "FOH" - Free Of Heart but that takes a massive tree for an 8x10 timber of any length. A well milled box heart timber sees the inevitible checking evenly distributed around the four sides. It also reduces the likelihood of grain runnout beyond specs for structural grading.

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    Originally posted by timberframe View Post

    When you mill your timbers, make sure to do them "box heart" with the pith in the centre. This will ensure grain runnout is minimized and that shrinkage cracks are distributed evenly.
    I had always heard that boxed heart was inferior timber?

    Leave a comment:


  • timberframe
    replied
    Originally posted by wbrent View Post
    Thanks guys. Maybe I have everything I need except the big auger bit. I have a couple of chisels up to 2”. Lots of hand saws. Plenty of hand planes as well for detail work. I keep things well sharpened. But I have used Dow Sharpening many times. Great resource only 15 minutes from my house.

    Brent, I’d love to take you up on a lesson next summer. Let me know when you come this way.
    For now I’ll spend the winter milling up logs for a build of some sort.
    When you mill your timbers, make sure to do them "box heart" with the pith in the centre. This will ensure grain runnout is minimized and that shrinkage cracks are distributed evenly.

    Leave a comment:


  • timberframe
    replied
    Originally posted by ErikM View Post

    Well Brent, having seen how well that chain mortiser works at roughing out mortises I would want one for any large timber frame project.
    Biggest time saver of all the TF tools I think!

    B

    Leave a comment:


  • ErikM
    replied
    Originally posted by timberframe View Post

    Egon gives good advice. Choosing a drill with a 90deg, secondary handle is a good idea.

    I have also seen a lot of timberframers use forstner bits in hand drills for hogging out mortises. On paper that's considered a recipe for a broken wrist, but they seem to get away with it.
    Well Brent, having seen how well that chain mortiser works at roughing out mortises I would want one for any large timber frame project.

    Leave a comment:


  • Egon
    replied
    Smaller bits will work well for mortices. Define the outline with some holes in the middle and then use a chisel to remove the wood. It will go much faster than you think.

    Leave a comment:


  • wbrent
    replied
    Thanks guys. Maybe I have everything I need except the big auger bit. I have a couple of chisels up to 2”. Lots of hand saws. Plenty of hand planes as well for detail work. I keep things well sharpened. But I have used Dow Sharpening many times. Great resource only 15 minutes from my house.

    Brent, I’d love to take you up on a lesson next summer. Let me know when you come this way.
    For now I’ll spend the winter milling up logs for a build of some sort.

    Leave a comment:


  • timberframe
    replied
    Originally posted by Egon View Post
    For the chisels a flattened leaf spring may work as starters. For the auger sizes you have listed a pretty hefty drill will be required and care taken so the drill does not turn you around or have the handle slip out of your hands.


    With the auger bits extension’s can be had or welded on. The vibrating tools work well for the cuts a mortise requires. And don’t dismiss hand saw’s to cut a tenon. Reciprocating saws may also work for mortices.
    With that said my experience with the larger joints is limited to saw horses or stands.
    Egon gives good advice. Choosing a drill with a 90deg, secondary handle is a good idea.

    I have also seen a lot of timberframers use forstner bits in hand drills for hogging out mortises. On paper that's considered a recipe for a broken wrist, but they seem to get away with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • timberframe
    replied
    Originally posted by wbrent View Post
    Looking for bits to rough out mortises mostly. But I guess having some smaller ones for the pins would be good too.
    Would love to be able to try some in a hand brace but probably will resort to an electric drill.
    Im practicing by building a pair of timber frame saw horses found on line ,using 4x4’s and 4x6’s.
    A lot of the hand saws I use in timberframing came from the giant flea market in Sussex. Properly sharpened, they work a treat! I have had mine sharpened by a guy in Rothesay who can sharpen anything. He can also look after any chisels you might want tuned up - Donnie Dow (Dow sharpening). Really nice guy.

    Depending on your mortise size, a 1.5" chisel and/or a 2" chisel can do everything you need. You could build a frame with one general purpose saw, one chisel, a few drill bits and a mallet.

    B

    Leave a comment:

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