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  • Dinning room table

    Hey guys,

    I’ve got a couple projects that I’m looking at starting in the next little but given my progress in other areas I’ll probably be writing in two years to talk about having completed them.

    My wife and I were recently down in Spokane and I came across some inspiration for the dinning room table I’ve been planning to build. As you all know sometimes an idea is easier to come up with than the actual build. With that said I wanted to run it by everyone for their thoughts.

    Essentially we are looking at a trestle style table. The historic, industrial nature of Spokane (especially the steam plant for those of you who have been) caught my eye. My thought is to build a thick top, as much as 3” which is what we had planned originally. This will likely be out of 3x12 fir beams which I will attempt to replicate a reclaimed look (unless anyone knows where in the Calgary area I could find similar dimensioned authentic material at a reasonable price). The top will be somewhere in the vicinity of 44”-48” wide and 8’-9’ long... so it’ll be a big heavy table! But right now it’s just an idea. The next part and what poses the biggest problem I can see is the legs.

    I was hoping to do a single columner leg at both ends. 1 post straight from the top to the floor cantered in the table. Obviously, one major issue is the table tipping, perhaps however the design may help with that depending on feedback. I planned to basically make a closed plywood rectangular box for each of the two legs. So the dimensions can be played with in so far as the foot space (perhaps a 18”x18” foot print) I was planning to face the box in brick to mimic an old brick pillar. I figured part of what would enable the table not to tip would be the overall weight of the leg... as sick I can fill the hollow of the box with the necessary amount of concrete to increase weight to the point that tipping isn’t an issue.

    The tipping was the biggest concern I could come up with so I’d like to get others thoughts along with additional issues I may not be thinking of. Also suggestions on the foot print of the leg along with weight etc.... would be helpful... anything to make it work. I have added a pic at with 3 options regarding the set up and they are in order of how I would prefer to build. The first is what I just explained. The second would be a closer design to an authentic post supporting a beam or ceiling. The third would be closer to a standard table. The additional supports in 2&3 would be wood.

    thanks everyone
    Attached Files
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  • #2

    Re: Dinning room table

    I’ve built a similar table for a customer out of reclaimed timbers, IIRC it is 10’ long, 40-42” wide, and the base is two wooden sections similar to what you’re describing in drawing 1, but no added weight of brick. The whole thing is about 400lbs. The base pedestals are around 24” wide. I personally feel that this is the minimum width I would be comfortable with. It’s stable enough that a child probably couldn’t tip it by climbing on it. I can dig up a photo later if you would like.
    VIDEOS: www.youtube.com/AWoodworkersLife

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    • #3

      Re: Dinning room table

      There are many things to address with this project. Firstly, it will be impossible to make the fir look like reclaimed oak unless it's painted. The grain structure of the 2 woods is so completely different. Fir is also terrible at taking a stain. It's prone to blotching & the the summer & winter growth rings take stain differently.

      As far as stability, you don't want it tipping if someone park's their behind on the table edge. That's especially important with such a heavy top because once it starts to go, it'll be tough to keep it from going over. It could weight up to 300 lbs.

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      • #4

        Re: Dinning room table

        Stephen, that would be great if you could dig up that photo when you have a chance. I’d imagine if this build does come together it will be a delicate balance between the overall size of the legs and keeping from becoming to over bearing as a whole.

        Drzarius, I’m not sure where the replica of oak idea came from I’m just going to attempt to finish the fir as is in a “reclaimed” fashion. I’ve got lots of info on doing that... doesn’t seem to bad.

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        • #5

          Re: Dinning room table

          Originally posted by drzaius View Post
          There are many things to address with this project. Firstly, it will be impossible to make the fir look like reclaimed oak unless it's painted. The grain structure of the 2 woods is so completely different. Fir is also terrible at taking a stain. It's prone to blotching & the the summer & winter growth rings take stain differently.

          As far as stability, you don't want it tipping if someone park's their behind on the table edge. That's especially important with such a heavy top because once it starts to go, it'll be tough to keep it from going over. It could weight up to 300 lbs.
          Why does it have to look like reclaimed oak? The one I mentioned above is actually done out of old growth fir.
          VIDEOS: www.youtube.com/AWoodworkersLife

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          • #6

            Re: Dinning room table

            I hoped my response cleared that up. I don’t have any intention of making it look like oak. I’d like it to look like reclaimed/old growth fir. It seems to be tough to find old growth in that size so I was just going to try and replicate it with new material.

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            • #7

              Re: Dinning room table

              Originally posted by Pat403 View Post
              Drzarius, I’m not sure where the replica of oak idea came from I’m just going to attempt to finish the fir as is in a “reclaimed” fashion. I’ve got lots of info on doing that... doesn’t seem to bad.
              Sorry, I'm not either. Somehow, I read 'oak' where there was none.

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              • #8

                Re: Dinning room table

                Originally posted by Pat403 View Post
                Stephen, that would be great if you could dig up that photo when you have a chance. I’d imagine if this build does come together it will be a delicate balance between the overall size of the legs and keeping from becoming to over bearing as a whole.
                I'm sorry I don't have a better shot of it on hand at the moment, I guess the rest of the pictures are on a different drive somewhere. But here's one that will give an idea of it. Hopefully the customer won't mind a cameo of himself in it.

                Click image for larger version

Name:	table photo (1 of 1).jpg
Views:	117
Size:	2.44 MB
ID:	1260579
                Attached Files
                VIDEOS: www.youtube.com/AWoodworkersLife

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                • #9

                  Re: Dinning room table

                  Beautiful table Stephen thanks for finding that me.
                  Stephan in BC likes this.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Dinning room table

                    Can you fasten the table to the floor? That would prevent tipping.
                    Chris Wong
                    http://flairwoodworks.com

                    If you have a hard time getting things perfectly level, maybe you need a First Guess Gravity Gauge.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Dinning room table

                      High Chris, great idea.... unfortunately I may not be around to enjoy the fruits of my labour once my wife kills me for putting holes in our new hardwood flooring

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