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Lets see your sharpening set ups... need help deciding

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  • guitarchitect
    replied
    I went the paul sellers route - silicone three diamond stones to a piece of plywood, use windex as lapping fluid. I have a Rikon variable speed grinder for setting bevels that is bolted to a sheet of plywood - I clamp it to the workbench when i need it, otherwise it goes in a cabinet.

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  • Nanook
    replied
    Originally posted by iamtooler View Post

    Does this wheel need to be used with reverse rotation like a cloth wheel?
    No - they are directional (basically a wrap of rubber) but they work fine with normal rotation.

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  • nugsthecat
    replied
    I have a Princess Auto 6" bench grinder that I use on occasion for grinding my primary bevels to around 25* using a fixed shop made guide. I previously used the wheel that came with the grinder, but I recently bought a white Norton course stone that I have yet to use. Then I use a Veritas Mk II honing guide set to 30* and use a fine and extra fine DMT diamond stone. I follow that up with 3 and 1 micron diamond paste. It gets everything super sharp and goes pretty quick, when I find the honing is taking too long (more than a minute or so) then i regrind on the bench grinder.

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  • Mark in Burlington
    replied
    Originally posted by Bobcdn View Post
    I have a floor model Wadkin/ Bursgreen grinder. I also have a single car garage workshop... I am sure you can see the issue. Time to down size to a small sharpening set up and sell or trade the Wadkin grinder

    Would like to see others sharpening set ups. I have been thinking of a low speed grinder with CBI diamond wheels and then a couple stones to follow it with- but I am obviously open to suggestions.

    Thanks.
    Bob, Sad you are down sizing, I am guilty of collecting grinders so I could probably take a page from your book.

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  • KenL
    replied
    I have a Veil belt sander that I use mainly on turning tools or when I really damage carving tools; it is also a real asset on those rare occasions when I need to rescue a broken or damaged knife.

    Most of my woodworking tools are sharpened with diamond plates, water stones and film media supported by various leather or MDF strops coated with Veritas green compound or diamond paste as appropriate. I use a Veritas sharpening system to help keep things square when significant stock needs to be removed from a nicked iron or chisel. Storage for the hand powered sharpening items is pretty compact; they all fit (except the StonePond) in a small Rubbermaid bin and/or in one of my workbench drawers. The little bin actually contains more polishing materiel (felt wheels, buffing wheels and compounds) than sharpening equipment. I find that sharpening has been a near life-long experiment with no single approach that works for everything in the shop but not much can defeat my current arsenal of tools and media.

    I do have two bench grinders, an 8" one on a stand and an older Shopcraft 5" one mounted on my buffing station. I haven't ground a plane iron or chisel in the past 20 years but do have a Veritas tool rest and jig for the 8" grinder should I ever occasion to need it. The fact is that if I used the grinders only for wood working tools, they would gather dust as Rod said! Despite their infrequent use, I keep my wheel grinders for those occasions when that is the best tool to use (besides, I really need them to grind metal lathe tools and such!)

    Ken

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  • Rod Sheridan
    replied
    For power sharpening I use a Viel belt grinder.

    It allows for a wide range of grits and mine has a forward/reverse switch for belt direction.

    I also have an 8 inch low speed grinder that collects dust....Rod

    P.S. For hand sharpening I use water stones and abrasive paper.

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  • Kayak Jim
    replied
    For chisels and plane irons I use waterstones in 1000/4000/8000 grits with a 325 diamond plate for flattening them. I use a 4" belt sander with a homemade angle jig for major edge reconstruction.

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  • Randy in Calgary
    replied
    I did not weight the base. I store some stuff in the drawer at the bottom but nothing heavy. It is very sturdy and stable.

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  • Bobcdn
    replied
    Jacques; Mostly chisels, plane irons. Sharpen as needed- I have a couple that were dragged into some reno work and of course they found the nails each time... so they need touched up on the grinder first. Other than that it would mostly be miscellaneous stuff. The planer has a helical head and I plan to eventually put one on the jointer as well.

    Nanook; thanks for the info on the different wheels, did not know that about the CBN wheels. The rubber wheel sounds interesting.

    Randy; Nice stand- did you put weight in the bottom? I am planning a flip top build to be able to keep my 12" miter saw in my small shop- but I want a work top when it is flipped. I will likely just mount it to a base I can clamp in the vise. I will look at the balancing system.

    Thanks guys!

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    Originally posted by Nanook View Post
    The Bear-Tex wheel is awesome, its basically a rubber wheel with ~4000grit embedded in it. Does some shaping, super easy to approach & takes the edge 99% of the way. The combo is great for turning tools.
    Does this wheel need to be used with reverse rotation like a cloth wheel?

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  • Randy in Calgary
    replied
    For a small shop, something like this is a space saver. I am never using the planer and the grinder at the same time (well 99.9% of the time anyways).
    My setup is a variable speed 8" grinder with one coarse and one fine Norton wheel. I use the Lee Valley balancing system and it runs as smooth as glass. For setup I have the Wolverine jig.
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  • Nanook
    replied
    I've been lucky to find a couple of 6" Baldor grinders for a lot less then retail - I really like those.

    I really like an ~80grit wheel (blue Norton) along with a fine Bear-Tex or Scotchbrite demurring wheel. I understand that the CBN wheels don't like softer metals, but if your only doing tool steel you should be OK. I like the Norton wheels because of lower cost & ability to bring anything without worrying about ruining an expansive wheel.

    The Bear-Tex wheel is awesome, its basically a rubber wheel with ~4000grit embedded in it. Does some shaping, super easy to approach & takes the edge 99% of the way. The combo is great for turning tools.

    If you get a second cheap grinder you can mount a LV brass wheel (for restoring old tools) and a felt wheel with compound.

    I did get the LV belt grinder and like it - don't love it & it seems to get the most use with carving tools.

    Other then that I'd recommend 1K, 5K and 8K Shapton stones and a 8" Dimond flattening stone. FYI - I'm not sure if the 5K Shapton stone is totally needed.

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  • Jacques Gagnon
    replied
    Originally posted by Bobcdn View Post
    I have a floor model Wadkin/ Bursgreen grinder. I also have a single car garage workshop... I am sure you can see the issue. Time to down size to a small sharpening set up and sell or trade the Wadkin grinder

    Would like to see others sharpening set ups. I have been thinking of a low speed grinder with CBI diamond wheels and then a couple stones to follow it with- but I am obviously open to suggestions.

    Thanks.
    Bob:

    A few questions come to mind:

    - what are you currently using your grinder for?
    - which tools do you sharpen? How often?
    - do you do a lot of hand tool work?

    I attended a seminar at Lee Valley last Fall; this allowed me to consider a few options, none of which involve a bench grinder. I am only sharpening hand tools; planer and jointer knives are sent out. I use a combination of water stones and Mylar sheets (very fine grits). I am a hobbyist with very different needs than production shops.

    I hope this helps to advance the conversation.

    Regards,

    J.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bobcdn
    started a topic Lets see your sharpening set ups... need help deciding

    Lets see your sharpening set ups... need help deciding

    I have a floor model Wadkin/ Bursgreen grinder. I also have a single car garage workshop... I am sure you can see the issue. Time to down size to a small sharpening set up and sell or trade the Wadkin grinder

    Would like to see others sharpening set ups. I have been thinking of a low speed grinder with CBI diamond wheels and then a couple stones to follow it with- but I am obviously open to suggestions.

    Thanks.
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