Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Using pine in place of oak

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fir-minator
    replied
    Another note on this bench build. All of the material used for this build was picked from a very nice pile of fence boards at Rona. I originally went looking for select pine and what they had was all twisted and warped. I took a walk through the yard to and found the fence boards and started sorting. I think I used about 15 boards total to build the bench so about $60 tax in plus $20 iirc at Lee Valley for the hinges. I had the beaded pine left over to make the panels from a reno I did in the house in Jan., that is why they were primed to start with. I guessing about $100 all in for the bench. Learned a lot, thanks to all for letting me tap into your expertise on this build!

    Leave a comment:


  • Fir-minator
    replied
    Thanks Carlos, I do like the self centering aspect of this jig. Looks like a nice project.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carlosinthesticks
    replied
    Here's a plan for a mortising jig you may not have found yet.

    Mortising Jig.pdf

    Leave a comment:


  • Fir-minator
    replied
    I just put the spreaders in to hold the spacers between the slats in place until the glue set. Just to put a small amount of pressure on them.

    I have been looking at several types of jigs for cutting M/T. What I really want is a mortise jig for my router. Simple enough to build and there are countless examples and how to videos available. Most could be purchased for a reasonable cost as well from a manufacturer such as Trend but on some of the videos I have seen, they show some degree of clean up required on the shoulders of the tenons. Since dialing in my cross cut sled, I can achieve perfect shoulders on all of my tenon pieces with no touch up required. I will likely keep making my tenons this way but would like to have a jig for mortises.

    I think a white wash would serve this bench well. I think my wife has a plan of cream with antiquing accents, we shall see!!

    Leave a comment:


  • WoodBob
    replied
    Very nice! I would suggest a whitewash finish.

    Leave a comment:


  • Woodwreck
    replied
    Originally posted by Fir-minator View Post
    . I should invest in a new one just to dedicate to the jig for future projects.
    If you are saying you might dedicate a new drill press to mortise and tenon, think further. Instead, consider a biscuit joiner, a Trend M&T jig; any one of numerous router based jigs, or go for first class and get a Festool Domino. Also, if your pieces are fairly straight, you should have no need for the "wedge kinda spreader things." Or why aren't your pipe clamps handling that?

    That's a really first class bench set shown.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fir-minator
    replied
    Great information, thanks! I did not allow for movement, I will revisit my design. I do have a mortising jig for my drill press but the drill press itself is quite worn and would not produce accurate results. I should invest in a new one just to dedicate to the jig for future projects.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carlosinthesticks
    replied
    Thats looking great, someone is going to be very happy with you. A couple of tips, or not depending on your view point.

    You cut tenons in your slats, the next step is to cut mortises to take them, alot less work and stronger construction than slots and spacers. If your a hand tool devote you can chop them with mortising chisels, or for a small investment get a mortising attachment for your drill press.

    The other item is screwing battens across the grain of a glued up panel (the seat), unless you allow that panel to move you can crack the battens or the panel itself, I learned that the hard way many many years ago in a rocking cradle I made for the young one.

    Heres a few tips from a very old book to solve that problem and allow the panel to move. I can't quite see the detail but you may have already allowed room for those screws to move on the battens.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Untitled.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	224.5 KB
ID:	1276098
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Fir-minator
    replied
    I think I kind of did what you are explaining. I put tenons on this slats as well as the spacers in between. The wedges are there to put pressure on the spacers I glued in.

    jist finished it this afternoon. A few things I would do different next time but overall, quite pleased at my first attempt at any thing furniture related. Here are a few pictures.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	945BB323-CE23-45EB-8663-FB5962C0F857.jpeg
Views:	164
Size:	3.61 MB
ID:	1276078Click image for larger version

Name:	5F373A9B-F52B-43BF-8F9D-DDEBCFED9707.jpeg
Views:	143
Size:	3.68 MB
ID:	1276079Click image for larger version

Name:	CB27A81B-0FD3-4B68-8869-A2F19284D465.jpeg
Views:	142
Size:	3.71 MB
ID:	1276080

    Leave a comment:


  • Woodwreck
    replied
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Gate spacer.JPG Views:	0 Size:	145.5 KB ID:	1275954 Y

    You're setting the slats in a long rabbit in the pic. Cut a long strip that fits snuggly & flush in the slot and then cross cut short pieces that fit as permanent flush spacers between the slats instead of those "wedge kinda spreader things." On glue up, if time is an issue, just glue and clamp one end at a time (e.g. all the tops or all the bottoms). Then later glue all the other ends at your leisure, with spacers there also.
    Last edited by Woodwreck; 03-28-2020, 07:13 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fir-minator
    replied
    Filled the grove with glue, slid pieces in and used some wedge kinda spreader things to hold fillers in place.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	213
Size:	3.42 MB
ID:	1275613

    Leave a comment:


  • Fir-minator
    replied
    Hoping someone can advise me on this glue up. Everything is dry fit and ready to go. Just trying to decide the best sequence to tackle this one.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	DE7CE069-AC62-4828-9588-AAB5E5982333.jpeg
Views:	217
Size:	76.6 KB
ID:	1275610

    Leave a comment:


  • Fir-minator
    replied
    I appreciate the advice Roy, thank you. I was thinking once I get the dry fit done and any adjustments made, I will give everything a going over. I also need to for the front legs to final size and style the tops of the rear legs into a peak.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy in Thunder Bay
    replied
    Fir... looks good so far, you are right to be satisfied. A reminder, if you don’t mind, is to round over all your edges before final assembly. It is much easier to do the individual pieces while disassembled as I found many years ago. Roy

    Leave a comment:


  • Fir-minator
    replied
    So I have begun! Learning lots already, lol! Cut all my mortises with my router table and a 1/4” up cut spiral bit. Took a bit of time but turned out pretty good. Lots of set up and re-set up. Was going to buy a new plunge router today but never ended up getting out. Likely would have been easier with a 1/2” bit. Ended up squaring out the holes vs rounding the tenon corners, wasn’t to bad. Set up on my crosscut sled with the dato stack for the tenons. Sled worked great, to much tearing on the face of the board with my old datos so I remade them and made my first cut to set the length of the tenon with a single blade then went back and run them over the dato to finish. Much nicer fit up now. Now have everything dry fit and it looks ok. May have to tweak a joint here and there but nothing serious. Here’s a picture of my progress.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X