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  • Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

    I have a new workshop / garage (2*4 construction)... and I plan to install rough sawn 1*10 pine on the walls.
    I will be hanging tools and this and that on various parts of the walls....and I do not want the board to be pulled off.....hate it when that happens.

    I would prefer to use nails for the install (8 zillion screws has limited appeal)...but the question is 16/18 gauge "finish" nails (would they have sufficient hold?)....or would I perhaps be wiser to use a framing nailer.

    Much obliged for any wisdom on the topic.

    Thanks,

    Julian
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  • #2

    Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

    I would use ardox nails, if using nails.

    but I would use screws.
    QC Inspector likes this.
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    • #3

      Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

      Finishing nail will not hold use a framing nail when the wood shrinks and expands the finishing nail heads will not give any holding power.
      Jerome
      Canada's South Coast

      Port Colborne On.
      Every loaf of bread is a tragic tale of grains that could've become whiskey.......but didn't....

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      • #4

        Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

        While screws are more work, they will hold much better. And down the road if you need to remove a board or boards, you will look back and thank yourself.
        Les Groeller and Leo Van Der Loo like this.
        Darrin

        Timber Elegance
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        • #5

          Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

          Originally posted by Julian View Post
          I have a new workshop / garage (2*4 construction)... and I plan to install rough sawn 1*10 pine on the walls
          Julian
          Do you have a plan for when the Pine shrinks and leaves a gap between the boards? I think if it was my shop and I wanted to be able to hang "stuff" anywhere on the wall, I would sheath with 1/2" sheathing, then cover that with something fire resistant such as drywall. I am sure there are other fire resistant choices.

          ... just a thought ...
          JimPTBO, Egon and smallerstick like this.

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          • #6

            Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

            BTDT on all of the above and I pre-drill the screws. Yes, more work but split boards are no favor. Consider coated deck screws.

            Second choice is 6d box nails with nailer.
            Start slow and wind down gracefully

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            • #7

              Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

              Perhaps a screw or 2 at the top and nails the rest of the way. Since all of your weight will be downward, I think either nails or screws will be ok in the long run. In fact, I have read that nails have a higher sheer strength than screws.

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              • #8

                Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

                Originally posted by John Bartley View Post

                Do you have a plan for when the Pine shrinks and leaves a gap between the boards? I think if it was my shop and I wanted to be able to hang "stuff" anywhere on the wall, I would sheath with 1/2" sheathing, then cover that with something fire resistant such as drywall. I am sure there are other fire resistant choices.

                ... just a thought ...
                I share John’s concern with shrinking/expanding boards due to humidity changes, as well as flammability.

                Rough sawn material will be uneven making hanging items more difficult as well as more difficult to clean dust off.....Rod
                JimPTBO and John Bartley like this.
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                • #9

                  Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

                  Honestly, I would use the fastener that is designed/normally used for this application. That is, you're really just putting up wood siding but on the interior rather than exterior, so use a siding nailer with a coil of siding nails.

                  If you can't borrow or rent a siding air nailer, then you could do it old school and hammer in the nice round top siding hand nails. They hold like a mother.

                  Barring all that, I'd use 2" ardor (spiral), and I'd use the galvy's as they don't cost that much more and it would be worth it never to have staining.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

                    Is the rough lumber being used as an interior wall? Or an exterior siding?

                    After reading Ryan's (callee) comment, it certainly would depend what side the wood is going on, and then possibly further info.



                    I just bought rough pine (1x8) for my kids playhouse siding, and rabbeted one edge to "lap" over the one below it. I screwed in place 1" below top edge to hide all fasteners.

                    But for an interior wall, fire ratings, gaps, etc certainly come into play.
                    [insert something witty here]

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                    • #11

                      Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

                      Back when I was building, we frequently did this as a "look" that wealthy clients specifically asked for. In days of yore, when cottages and hunt camps were actually just cottages and hunt camps, it was common just to slap rough pine up on the walls horizontally. When it shrank, you got to see the black lines of the tar paper behind it.

                      (Of course, more common back then was not to have any interior sheathing at all, and just to have exposed framing and the backside of the exterior clapboard showing inside the cottage)

                      It's an odd thing here in the muskokas - you can get two kinds of rich cottagers - the ones who are rich and want their cottage to explicitly show off how rich they are (these are mostly in the southern area, around Lake Joe, Rousseau, port carling) and then the ones who are even richer but they want their cottage to make it look like they are just regular poor people who have cottage​d there for generations. These are the ones who will want to imitate the old looks like this.

                      So after framing and insulating the walls, we'd add an extra layer of thick black plastic on the inside (real tar paper is too smelly). Then we'd nail on the rough pine, using 3" nails to set the gap (they wanted the look to be immediate, not next year when it dried out more), and since it was decorative and not load bearing as in this OP, we'd just face nail it with 16gauge.

                      These days I've seen a manufactured product made of MDF designed to mimic this same effect, but be more seasonally stable. It did look sharp, but I don't think I'd want MDF walls.

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                      • #12

                        Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

                        By friend built a 50 ft x 100 ft shop and lined the interior with white steel exterior siding. I have always been a fan of rough pine but after seeing his shop it is my interior shop walls of choice. It may be more expensive initially but once installed there is no crack filling, painting etc. And the steel will hold what ever you want to hang. Another thing I wish I had done was to install all my electrical plugs in conduit on the surface of interior walls. It makes it real easy to remove or relocate receptacles. I would use Ryan’s suggestion for installing the wood. One thing I would do is have a consistent nailing pattern so that the spacing and the nails are at a consistent distance from the floor. It will look much neater rather than having them willy nilly all over the wall. ‘If you decide to go with finishing nails I would use a 15 gauge pin. They have a much larger head than your 16 gauge.
                        If your dreams don't scare you, you are not dreaming big enough

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                        • #13

                          Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

                          Originally posted by Brian @ Muir View Post
                          By friend built a 50 ft x 100 ft shop and lined the interior with white steel exterior siding. I have always been a fan of rough pine but after seeing his shop it is my interior shop walls of choice. It may be more expensive initially but once installed there is no crack filling, painting etc. And the steel will hold what ever you want to hang. Another thing I wish I had done was to install all my electrical plugs in conduit on the surface of interior walls. It makes it real easy to remove or relocate receptacles.
                          This is what I would do if I were to build another garage.

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                          • #14

                            Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

                            Me too. BW

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                            • #15

                              Re: Attaching rough sawn pine to walls in workshop

                              If you are going for a old barn look then I would go with framing nails. If you have a framing nail gun then it would make quick work of it. The nails will add to the barn look.

                              If what you are looking for is a pristine look then why go with rough pine in the first place.

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