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Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

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  • Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

    With the drawers completed, I turned my focus to making the convex doors which will be inset into the hutch section of each of the cabinets.

    It starts with cutting the curved rails to length, using a jig to hold the full width pieces in position:

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    ...then sawing the outside ends to the correct angle. † Of course I had to make another jig for this operation:

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    I set up my Multi-Router slot mortiser with a 3/8" milling bit and designed two separate jigs to hold the rails into proper position for milling out the mortises. † (Separate jigs were required for each end, because of the assymetrical shape of the rails). † I then went ahead and milled the mortises:

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    With the rails cut to proper length, the ends angled correctly and the mortises made, I then focussed on the stiles. † I decided to go with traditional tenons rather than slip tenons, so in determining the total length of each rail, I had to factor in the length of the tenon sections. † I made the tenons 1/8" shorter than the total depth of the mortises to provide an area for the excess glue to be pushed into. † Here's the math I went through:

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    I cut the stiles to correct length then dado'd the tenons to the same width and thickness as their matching mortises. † Here's a photo of one set of rails and stiles:

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    I decided to round over the sides of the tenons rather than square the mortises, primarily because that's quicker for me. † Fitting each of the tenons to their mating mortises is relatively quick, but requires careful attention to ensure things are square in all planes:

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    Here's what two of the doors look like in their dry fit. † As you can see in that photo, I still had to rip the outer stiles to match the rail outside end.


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    I unfortunately didn't take any photos to show the process of trueing the inside and outside faces of the stiles to match the curves of the rails, but suffice it to say it took a considerable amount of effort and focus. † I used a variety of hand planes, one of which is a vintage curved sole wooden plane which I love using. † These were followed by quite a bit of rough sanding with a ROS sander, until I was satisfied.

    I then turned my attention to handing the doors into their cabinets. † I decided to use traditional brass hinges rather than more modern euro hinges. † I would have preferred to have the highest quality butt hinges by such makers as Brusso, but my budget wouldn't allow it. † Instead I used some middle-of-road solid brass hinges I had purchased years ago when they were on special from Richelieu Hardware. † Here's the general process; notice that I installed the hinges using steel screws. † Those were replaced with brass ones once I was happy with how the doors hung (had I first attempted to install brass screws, there would have been a good possibity they would have broken, hence the reason for first screwing in the harder steel screws):

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    With the hinges screwed to the doors, I then went about marking the locations for the hinge mortises on the inside of the cabinet frames, then machining them with a router, chisels and router plane. † But... before marking the mortise locations, I first laid down a piece of 1/32" thick veneer on the base of the door frame, which elevates the doors to provide the correct reveal. † Had I not done that, the marks would have placed the doors hard against the bottom of the door frame, resulting in considerable amount of hand work to plane them off.

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    I then set the door in place and went ahead to mark the hinge mortise locations:

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    After cleaning out the hinge mortises on the insides of the cabinet, I set the doors into place, and drilled the screw holes using my Vix bit. † Again, I first set the hinges using steel screws, and when I was satisified that they were hanging correctly, went ahead and replaced all the steel screws with brass ones.

    Here's how things look now that all doors have been hung. † I still need to plane them to their final reveals (1/32" is my preference), but for now I'm pretty happy with the results:

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    Have yourself a great day.
    Attached Files
    Frank D., WoodBob and 2 others like this.
    All the best,

    Marty

    - Instagram: @apexwoodworks
    - facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Apex-Woodwo...0243458908979/

    Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

    Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

    Been following on IG Marty, amazing attention to detail.
    [insert something witty here]

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

      Looks pretty...

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

        Originally posted by bogmer View Post
        Looks pretty...
        Thanks, Gabriel. †
        All the best,

        Marty

        - Instagram: @apexwoodworks
        - facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Apex-Woodwo...0243458908979/

        Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

        Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

          How difficult was the decision to put the stiles of the doors between the rails Marty, I totally understand why you have done it but it is unusual?

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

            Hey, Bob,

            † Truthfully, I did fret a bit over it. † † But because it allowed the rails to be the same width as the drawer fronts, which to my eye was a continuity element that I felt more pleasing, I went with that layout.

            † I'm not the only one who has done it. † James Krenov often did that, a few examples of which may be seen in this video of him, at 1:11 and 5:50 as but two examples. † There have been other masters who have done it as well, but I think Krenov is example enough to make my point.

            † I think that we need to let our design eye help guide us in such decisions, rather than what's normally seen - just as long as function isn't compromised. † Because to me, both have to work in harmony for me to consider a piece successful. †

            † Thanks for your insightful observation.
            All the best,

            Marty

            - Instagram: @apexwoodworks
            - facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Apex-Woodwo...0243458908979/

            Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

            Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)

            Comment

            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

              Originally posted by MartyFromKingston View Post
              Hey, Bob,

              Truthfully, I did fret a bit over it. But because it allowed the rails to be the same width as the drawer fronts, which to my eye was a continuity element that I felt more pleasing, I went with that layout.

              I'm not the only one who has done it. James Krenov often did that, a few examples of which may be seen in this video of him, at 1:11 and 5:50 as but two examples. There have been other masters who have done it as well, but I think Krenov is example enough to make my point.

              I think that we need to let our design eye help guide us in such decisions, rather than what's normally seen - just as long as function isn't compromised. Because to me, both have to work in harmony for me to consider a piece successful.

              Thanks for your insightful observation.
              Because I work on my own now its difficult to get reasonable, thought out, dialogue, I don't always talk sense to myself, so your comments are insightful.
              Years ago I made a cupboard for myself and mitered the door stiles and rails, in those days I didn't have the tools I have now and borrowed someones drop saw and biscuit machine to do the job with since then I did the kitchen doors, now I look at the mitered joints and wonder do I like them.
              I while back I was working on a 30meter boat and they had convex doors they were made wrong and did not work well I was asked to fix them which by that time was not possible so with my past experience its interesting to watch you and hear what you say.

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

                Originally posted by bkrits View Post

                Because I work on my own now its difficult to get reasonable, thought out, dialogue, I don't always talk sense to myself, so your comments are insightful.
                Years ago I made a cupboard for myself and mitered the door stiles and rails, in those days I didn't have the tools I have now and borrowed someones drop saw and biscuit machine to do the job with since then I did the kitchen doors, now I look at the mitered joints and wonder do I like them.
                I while back I was working on a 30meter boat and they had convex doors they were made wrong and did not work well I was asked to fix them which by that time was not possible so with my past experience its interesting to watch you and hear what you say.
                We all have so much to learn along this journey, don't we, Bob?
                All the best,

                Marty

                - Instagram: @apexwoodworks
                - facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Apex-Woodwo...0243458908979/

                Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

                Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

                  Originally posted by beakie View Post
                  Been following on IG Marty, amazing attention to detail.
                  Thanks, Tom. † What's your IG name?
                  All the best,

                  Marty

                  - Instagram: @apexwoodworks
                  - facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Apex-Woodwo...0243458908979/

                  Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

                  Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

                    Originally posted by MartyFromKingston View Post

                    Thanks, Tom. † What's your IG name?
                    I have no idea, I will have to look, I'm not exactly IG savvy!

                    edit:

                    Seems I am; trg.mccrea
                    Not much to see, I like following those of you who know what they are doing, to watch and imagine I could do the same one day.
                    Last edited by beakie; 07-18-2020, 10:06 AM.
                    [insert something witty here]

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

                      Originally posted by MartyFromKingston View Post

                      We all have so much to learn along this journey, don't we, Bob?
                      Yes I agree and if more people posted their builds on here as you have done we could all learn from each other.

                      Comment

                      • Thread Continues Below...

                      • #12

                        Re: Dining Room Corner Cabinet Build Thread - Chapter 4: Doors

                        †Hi Marty, I have been wondering if I should weigh in with hinge techniques, and have decided I would. I too use regular butt hinges for all my doors. I actually don’t like to use the “modern“ euro hinges because they just don't give me the look or feel that I want in my furniture. One thing that I do when hanging doors, is to only drill the center hole in each hinge blade. It gives you enough purchase that you can hang your doors and see how they fit. If you have to shim a corner in or out, it is easy enough to do with thin slices of veneer. Why shim, you ask? Most butt hinges, no matter how well made will have small discrepancies in finished size. Combine that with small discrepancies with hinge mortise placement, and you can easily have doors that hang crooked or twisted. A small shim in the back of the correct hinge mortise takes care of that.
                        I have a selection of various veneers in various thicknesses from 0.010 to 0.025 that I use as hinge shim material. Gluing a small slice that is as long as the hinge blade and (slightly thicker,) behind the hinge blade will push the opposite corner into alignment and once the shim is flushed up and sanded flat, is impossible to see. Once I have all of my doors adjusted to where I want them to be, I drill the rest of the holes and fasten the hinge blades. Shimming a hinge out even 0.025 will cause all the screws to be misaligned by exactly that much, and I hate to do it. A vix bit will almost always guarantee perfectly centered screws, but if you are going to shim after predrilling your screw holes, you may as well just use any old drill bit and eyeball center as best you can.

                        Comment

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