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Can This Chair Be Saved?

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  • #16

    Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

    Here is perhaps the worst chair repair that I've ever seen. U.G.L.Y. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbV68Y7_hQk

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    • #17

      Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

      Man.  That was great
      Noel

      "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
      'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
      "

      John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

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      • #18

        Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

        Originally posted by woody820 View Post
        Here is perhaps the worst chair repair that I've ever seen. U.G.L.Y. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbV68Y7_hQk
        Realistically, short of replacing the whole leg or maybe doing a better job of getting the joint tight and matching the finish better what else could he have done? The dowells likely do a good job of reinforcing the repair. What would you suggest as a prettier repair? In many cases making a strong repair is a challenge, making an invisible repair is " Mission Impossible" even by the pros.
        Redneck Albertan likes this.

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        • #19

          Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

          I hope that by now the chair owner will have give up on the idea of a repair and that Ryan will be relived he is not wondering how he is going to fix it.
          I while ago I came across an old fellow who had been promising his wife he would renovate 4 chairs for years, I offered to do 2 of them for some wood he had, as you can imagine it was a bigger job than I expected (aren't they all) I took every joint apart they had hand cut dowels, I put the legs on the lathe and sanded them up, where there were bits missing I glued new pieces of wood on I drilled out all the old dowels to 1/2" and glued them up with a thick epoxy so all the gaps were filled, there were a lot of nails to remove and a lot of sanding, I remember one of them didn't glue up correctly and the front was not parallel to the back or maybe the sides were not at the same angle, it was interesting that some of the seat padding was dried grass.
          The man was happy and offered to pay me to do the other 2, I think I got minimum wage but then I would not have wanted to pay that much if they had been mine.
          The owner had to get them sprayed and upholster, I did get around to his house one day and they did look a million dollars, they could have easily have been on the rubbish pile or in the fire as no one else would have done what I did.    

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          • #20

            Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

            Originally posted by Doug G View Post

            making an invisible repair is " Mission Impossible" even by the pros.
            I would agree with that statement Doug having been doing this for over 20yrs. The trick is to disguise the repair in cracks etc so that it doesn't stand out as the eye picks out discordant lines far more readily than something that appears broken up. The mistake a lot of folks make is trying to find or making one colour to blend in.

            Paul

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            • #21

              Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

              So, Ryan: Can the chair be saved?
              Noel

              "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
              'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
              "

              John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

              Comment

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              • #22

                Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

                Originally posted by beachburl View Post
                So, Ryan: Can the chair be saved?
                Waiting for the owner to get back from a camping trip so we can talk. I'll be sure to update the thread though, thanks!

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                • #23

                  Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

                  Similar to some of the other suggestions- glue it up with G2 epoxy. After it's cured, cut some slots into the wood from the back, and glue in some splines.

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                  • #24

                    Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

                    The proper repair can certainly be done. This is a very common damage on many Victorian chairs. I have one that requires a similar repair which I can and will do because it's a family piece that I inherited and has a special value to me.
                    Since the piece in question is really a prop and at this time should be relatively easy to replace with something similar and at a very moderate price, A good source for items like this is The RESTORE. They get a lot of older furniture such as this donated when older owners are downsizing or estates are being dispersed. If the Restore staff see potential to sell the pieces donated with moderate investment to bring the piece up to standard and turn them over they will do the work which often amounts to a good cleaning or minor restoration. The market for antique furniture isn't what it once was so values are very low for all but the best. The Restore I'm most familiar with is located in Cobourg, Ontario. For those Forum Members not familiar with Restore, they can be an excellent source for a wide variety of stuff including tools at excellent prices.

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                    • #25

                      Re: Can This Chair Be Saved?

                      Check out the website under 'furniture' https://shop.habitatnorthumberland.c...rniture?page=3

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