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making my own vintage wainscot

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  • phil
    replied
    Originally posted by Scott Walsh View Post

    This position is call a Plate-Rail Wainscoting, and is most common in dining rooms.
    yes that makes sense.
    here is the layout and some drawings of a Sears house, Very similar style to mine,
    I do not have a dining room, just a fair sized kitchen.

    you can see the plate rail in the dining room , as you suggested.
    https://searshomes.org/index.php/201...ud-the-argyle/

    Phil

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  • Scott Walsh
    replied
    Originally posted by WoodBob View Post
    And can you better describe where you are putting this? Half way up the window at eye level does not sound like any wainscotting I have ever seen. Usually it would be maybe 1/3rd the way up the wall.
    This position is call a Plate-Rail Wainscoting, and is most common in dining rooms.

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  • phil
    replied
    Originally posted by WoodBob View Post

    I don't see how you'd lose more than maybe 1/2" by doing T&G. And can you better describe where you are putting this? Half way up the window at eye level does not sound like any wainscotting I have ever seen. Usually it would be maybe 1/3rd the way up the wall.
    1/3 up is common too. then you'd have a chair rail on top. but yes some homes had taller wainscot, as in the reference pics. the photo showing the scratch coat of plaster proves it wasn't finished plaster there, so that's how I know how high it was. That was obviously not changed, just covered after they ripped whatever was there out.

    'And can you better describe where you are putting this?'

    - it will sit on top of the baseboard , which is 1 inch thick and 8 inches tall. I will add a strip to the backside of the baseboard to step it out, otherwise it sort of gets buried.
    I just have the longest one installed and I glued a 3/8 strip to it so it is over 1" thick.

    the window casings are 3/4" they fit flat to the walls. If I were to install a 1/2" wainscott, then they would only protrude by 1/4" beside the wainscott. above the wainscot the window casings sit flat to the wall.

    originally when they plastered these houses, they put a scratch coat of plaster, then they quickly fitted all the baseboards and sort of squished them into the wet plaster. That was so that if the baseboard or the wall had a bit of curvature it was hidden.
    They did not put plaster behind the baseboards but nailed some blocking there.

    the way I do it is I just run the drywall to the floor and then put the baseboard over the drywall. ( rather than just adding spacers) I also finish the drywall right up to the window frames. It helps block noise and heat loss. also it just looks more finished as It's a room I use and didn't want it to be too messy as I work through the stages.

    back in the 50's or 60's old homes were not considered anything special, they often tried to modernize them. typically by now someone painted in all the woodwork and drywalled and stuff like that. in many homes since it is painted it never gets unpainted again and in new houses they use pine or MDF junk and it needs to be painted. Typically all the casings are smaller. They like to replicate the craftsman stye a lot today, but they often cheap out on the wood by reducing dimension.

    I restored the plaster in one room but I couldn't see a difference once the walls were finished. Insulation was a good invention and they did not insulate at all back in 1924. other than heat I needed to block sound so all the drywall on the outside of this room is now 5/8ths soundproof drywall. Its 75 bucks a sheet. but supposedly blocks the same amount of sound as about 7 sheets of drywall.

    They had dropped the ceiling in my kitchen from 9 feet to under 8 feet. I tore it out and got the 9' back.
    on the ceiling in this room I pulled the acoustic tiles and it had plaster, I put 1/2" drywall over the plaster. a friend helped me and we put up 10 foot sheets so it didn't have so many joints. I put corner bead in every corner to get nice crisp corners. even the inside corners. I use some glue in with the mud to bed my tape and cornerbead so it never falls off. I hate it when tape comes loose.
    Last edited by phil; 11-25-2020, 01:45 PM.

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  • phil
    replied
    Originally posted by WoodBob View Post
    Phil - When posting pictures it is easier to post and easier for us to see your pictures if you use the "camera" icon in the upper left corner of the editor window!
    Thanks I'll try that. I might have been editing them as you looked. .

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  • phil
    replied
    Click image for larger version  Name:	LR walls1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	188.0 KB ID:	1305644 this one shows the scratch coat of plaster, and finished plaster above eye level. It works out to half way up the casement windows and it also coincides with 1/3 , 2/3 of the doublehung bay windows.

    when I got to it , it had drywall over all that, feathered in flat, and a few layers of wallpaper which was painted of course ;-)
    in those gaps were nail strips, I think.

    the scratch coat proved it had some sort of wainscot. It could have been panels. It was all gone though.
    Last edited by phil; 11-25-2020, 12:39 PM.

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  • phil
    replied
    these are just pics I took ideas from. ( posted above) I think they are a bit older than my house. You can see how one has a little shelf and brackets. Ill do something like that.
    Those rooms feel a bit dark to me. I like to see the wood but I don't want it to look like a cave.

    mine had 50's acoustic tiles on the ceiling and I tore that out , finished the ceiling flat. It had a non original painted crown so I took that out too. I'm trying to eliminate all the painted wood. I pulled all the casings and baseboards and Im stripping them so they show the fir as well.
    I had to sand a lot from the floors. they were pretty marked up. someone had used a knife to cut cork flooring and went a bit deep with the knife, and some places wehre they dragged furniture bruised quite deep.

    It still has a few bruises. It had a lot of nails that got exposed but I drove them all down and puttied them. a couple of spots in other parts got a bit too thin and the T and G broke but overall Its not bad. some of the flooring was missing and I found odd plywood and patches. In the kitchen it was never sanded and it had Jute or battleship lyno with several other layers over it. it had a lot of rust spots near the nails, so that floor I treated with wood bleach. tht got rid of a lot of the black marks but lightened the floor. I then used a wee bit of stain in my oil to darken them back so they match.

    replaced it with other old flooring. I did successfully refinish all the old floors and got them all nice and flat. I puttied most of the cracks, hand scraped it, put a few coats of danish oil and then three coats of polyurathane.

    I dont seem to have a good pic of the flooring now but it came out nice.

    Phil



    Last edited by phil; 11-25-2020, 12:40 PM.

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  • WoodBob
    replied
    Phil - When posting pictures it is easier to post and easier for us to see your pictures if you use the "camera" icon in the upper left corner of the editor window!

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  • WoodBob
    replied
    Originally posted by phil View Post
    The T and G wouldn't be any harder. I could cut that on the tablesaw too, but then my wood would go half as far.
    I was wondering if they would go too twisty but it seems like it will actually cooperate and you can't see the thickness at all when it's all installed. the bottom edge sits on the baseboard and Ill have a cap that forms a 4" ledge at the top of it.

    If I went full thickness then when it butts against the window casings it will sort of mostly bury the outside edge. It will go halfway up the window, to eye level. If I stuck a 1/2" spacer behind the window casing, it would look funny above the casing as they would then protrude 1 1/4" from the wall.

    I'd need thicker spacers behind the baseboards so they didn't get buried with the wainscott, Since they are mostly still off, that's still possible.

    I'll have to face nail it a bit, and putty them, unless I can depend on only glue to attach it to the painted wall. if it were T and G I'd put nails in like flooring is done.

    Phil
    I don't see how you'd lose more than maybe 1/2" by doing T&G. And can you better describe where you are putting this? Half way up the window at eye level does not sound like any wainscotting I have ever seen. Usually it would be maybe 1/3rd the way up the wall.

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  • phil
    replied
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_5503 copy.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.45 MB ID:	1305622 Click image for larger version  Name:	Screen Shot 2016-07-10 at 10.04.16 AM.png Views:	0 Size:	992.5 KB ID:	1305623
    Last edited by phil; 11-25-2020, 12:27 PM.

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  • phil
    replied
    here are a few pics showing the progress of the room. the one showing flooring is yellowed because of my work light.
    once the flooring was finished and allowed to darken it darkened up nicely.

    You can see where it still had plaster , the scratch coat went up to about halfway up the window.

    near the windows, they had curved the plaster and I had to work to replicate those curves. Im trying to figure out how my wainscott should be on the curved portions, maybe I need to make some curved stuff. Click image for larger version

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    I suspect I would not like to see the wainscoting sitting on top of the baseboard. It seems to me that eye level is not normal either.

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  • phil
    replied
    The T and G wouldn't be any harder. I could cut that on the tablesaw too, but then my wood would go half as far.
    I was wondering if they would go too twisty but it seems like it will actually cooperate and you can't see the thickness at all when it's all installed. the bottom edge sits on the baseboard and Ill have a cap that forms a 4" ledge at the top of it.

    If I went full thickness then when it butts against the window casings it will sort of mostly bury the outside edge. It will go halfway up the window, to eye level. If I stuck a 1/2" spacer behind the window casing, it would look funny above the casing as they would then protrude 1 1/4" from the wall.

    I'd need thicker spacers behind the baseboards so they didn't get buried with the wainscott, Since they are mostly still off, that's still possible.

    I'll have to face nail it a bit, and putty them, unless I can depend on only glue to attach it to the painted wall. if it were T and G I'd put nails in like flooring is done.

    Phil

    Last edited by phil; 11-25-2020, 11:45 AM.

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  • WoodBob
    replied
    I think I'd do a true tongue in groove.

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  • phil
    replied
    Ok hers a quick sample
    I can get it a bit thicker I think I can split it on the bandsaw but I just used my tablesaw for this nothing else.

    the joint is simply a 45 degree bevel cut on one side then the fence moved in a tad and then the second side is flipped to make the pointy side

    in samples it didn’t even seem to mess things up if one was a bit thicker, they still mate up , the thicker one just stands out a bit prouder.

    I cant decide if should have another groove
    Down the middle ?

    I started into this imagining it being more difficult and complex but maybe this simple pattern would reflect what I imagine was original to 1924 craftsman style house

    nothing sanded or finished in the pic it’s just the underside of the old flooring boards that you see but it gave some contrast for a picture

    the one at the left I flipped just so you can see the grain, it’ll all look like that

    I guess I’m could cut the joint on my jointer it would cut a bit smoother but maybe it’s easier just on the tablesaw since I can reference to the fence

    i dont know if i should even bother using the jointer or thickness planer for this


    Phil

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    All the farm houses around me were panelled with BC Fir, it cost 46$ per thousand back in the day apparently. It is near impossible to remove without splintering the panelling . It is about 1/2" thick and 2 or 3'' wide. It was most often varnished.

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