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Tale of two chairs

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  • #16

    Re: Tale of two chairs

    It would be strong enough but the lock mitre also helps with lining them up correctly. And, anything worth doing is worth over doing
    jim.gilchrist likes this.
    Jerome
    Canada's South Coast

    Port Colborne On.
    CARPENTER noun. (car-pun-ter)
    1) A person who solves problems you can't.
    2) One who does precision guesswork based on unreliable data, provided by those of questionable knowledge. see also: wizard, magician.

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    • #17

      Re: Tale of two chairs

      Yes, the lock miter joint gives it more glue surface and built in alignment. Its also one of the recommended methods for the legs in the guide. Even the Stickly built arts and crafts legs in this type used a version of a lock miter joint, so good enough for them is good enough for me.

      And so, last two days involved gluing the legs together. One method I found for doing these type of legs was to add cauls to the sides and then wrap them with bungee cords to clamp them. Seemed to work out, but had to go buy some long bungees for the job. Then with seven legs done, I ran out of glue, so had to go get that too.

      Last leg glued and wrapped.
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      And all eight legs done.
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      • #18

        Re: Tale of two chairs

        Was the lock miter difficult to do on your router table?

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        • #19

          Re: Tale of two chairs

          It was the first time doing these for me. It took some time to set up and a number of test pieces until it was right, found some helpful videos to give me some tips on getting it set. You have to get both the bit height and fence position exact to get a match up on the joint. After that, no real issue for the Porter Cable 3 HP router running at mid speed. Made a lot of chips, I would consider cutting a partial bevel cut another time to remove some material to make less work for the router and less chips. Glad the dust collection did it's job.

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          • #20

            Re: Tale of two chairs

            You have some nice looking grain there.
            Ed in Calgary likes this.
            Jerome
            Canada's South Coast

            Port Colborne On.
            CARPENTER noun. (car-pun-ter)
            1) A person who solves problems you can't.
            2) One who does precision guesswork based on unreliable data, provided by those of questionable knowledge. see also: wizard, magician.

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            • #21

              Re: Tale of two chairs

              Not much work on the chairs themselves, but some related background activity. I did do the final cleanup on the legs with squaring them on the jointer and a final sizing through the planer. I had left about a 1/16" on them with this in mind. I've laid out the locations for the mortises, and that led to the next bit of work. I plan to make the mortises using my plunge router and was looking at ways to do that. The mortises for the stretchers are all 3/4" wide, so outside the capacity of any jigs or methods currently in my arsenal. The FWW article shows cutting them using a router guide fence and a second block clamped to the router to guide it. The all that needs to be manually controlled is the length of the cut. Seems doable, but looking at my crude DIY router guide I made many years ago made me realize I needed something better. So into the machine room and an afternoon spent building a better guide.

              I made the rails from 3/8" drill rod with a turned down end to fit the router base, then milled the guide from a block of Delrin plastic. All I need to still do is to add a wider wood face onto the block. There are holes drilled and tapped for that in the block.

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              I'm working on an idea for a base plate that will incorporate the opposing guide block on an adjustable slide.

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              • #22

                Re: Tale of two chairs

                Nice but why not do the mortices on the router table?
                Cheers
                Randy

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                • #23

                  Re: Tale of two chairs

                  I've just never liked the process of lowering the wood onto the bit and trying to stop the cut in the right spot blind even with marks. There are quite a few mortises to do for these chairs and this method just seems to have better control and probability of accuracy.

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                  • #24

                    Re: Tale of two chairs

                    Originally posted by Ed in Calgary View Post
                    I've just never liked the process of lowering the wood onto the bit and trying to stop the cut in the right spot blind even with marks. There are quite a few mortises to do for these chairs and this method just seems to have better control and probability of accuracy.
                    Ed -- I think you're on the right track but I would use something that restrains both the leg and the router. Make a square that's 3/8' larger than your router base and use a 3/8" up cut bit. under that make a jig that holds the leg in the right place. Now you can drop your router on the leg and cut as much or little as you like. This is very easy to do and very safe. If you need more info then just ask.

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                    • #25

                      Re: Tale of two chairs

                      I know the method your describing Wally. What I am looking at is similar except with the guides on the router to position the bit on the width of the legs and I may clamp on stop blocks for the mortise length. I plan to do the mortises with a 3/4" plunge bit and using the plunge base for my router rather than a fixed base. I will try doing the cuts in a few passes to see how it cuts rather than trying to go full depth in a single go. The legs having the hollow in them, means the real depth of the cut is only 3/4". I'll test on some scraps of course before going to work on the legs themselves. And it goes without saying that the legs will be securely clamped down to do this.

                      The smaller mortises in the side rails and back supports will work with the mortising jig I have which can accommodate up to 1/2" by 2" mortises.

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                      • #26

                        Re: Tale of two chairs

                        Finished the router guide fences today. I made a new base plate from lexan and incorporated the adjustable block into it. Seems to move quite smoothly on the leg, should make nice accurate mortises.

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                        Dean, Randy in Calgary and 2 others like this.

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                        • #27

                          Re: Tale of two chairs

                          Good progress today. Started off this morning working on the bending form for the arms. I used 3/4" MDF layered to the width needed. I made the first blank by cutting it on the bandsaw then sanding it to the correct curvature. Each successive blank was screwed on and then routed to shape following the previous layer. Then a layer of packing tape to act as a glue barrier and the final edge guide added. It used up nearly a half sheet of the MDF so it's substantial.

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                          • #28

                            Re: Tale of two chairs

                            This afternoon I got to the routing of the mortises in the legs. I did a test piece to get a sense of how it would work going by eye to stop at the ends of the cut. That proved to be a bit sketchy, so on to making a stop block of some sort. What I ended up doing was making a saddle piece that would also serve as a clamp pad to hold the leg while the routing was done. This worked very well and with only one minor issue of the guide block slipping on the base which was corrected with a layer of adhesive backed sandpaper applied to add some friction to the block. Delrin and Lexan are both slick, so this solved that problem. All the mortises for the side rails are cut, next will be the mortises for the front and back rails.

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                            • #29

                              Re: Tale of two chairs

                              Ed...thanks for the time you are taking to record and present your efforts. I am enjoying the journey! Roy
                              Are you solving the problem, or becoming part of it?

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                              • #30

                                Re: Tale of two chairs

                                More progress, finally got the resin glue to start on the bent lamination arms. It was stuck in the mail for an extra week. Got right to work with the first glue up. I recall a saying about too many clamps.

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                                I've been working on the tenons as well. Got the bulk of the work done on the table saw, the final fitting is hand tool work. I made an aluminum marking pattern to match the rounded mortises, the first step after marking it out is to saw away the waste. Following that is chisel and rasp work to finalize the shape. I bit of planing gets the thickness right to perfect fit.

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                                Just have to repeat this process 24 times.

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