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Tale of two chairs

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  • #31

    Re: Tale of two chairs

    Rounding the tenons is a lot of work. Do you think it easier than squaring the mortises? I'm asking because I square and that's no fun either.

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    • #32

      Re: Tale of two chairs

      I don't know the answer to that. Yes, both options are work. I've done the squaring before with smaller mortises and didn't find it fun. I think though for me hand tool work is not my strength, so any endeavor into it is a challenge. I'm trying to force myself to do more of it to build my skills and be more comfortable with it. I think maybe that is why I went with rounding this time since it is not a technique I've used before. Trying to build my repertoire with my projects. I need to learn to take my time more sometimes too, which is part of the hand tool issue. I'm finding that following distractions helps a bit in that it takes me away from the repetitiveness, but it does slow the work. Not entirely a bad thing.

      On that note. yesterday I got distracted with doing some sharpening since my shoulder plane needed some attention. That led to digging out some old planes that I salvaged from my uncles farm that had belonged to my grandfather. I spent a few hours yesterday and much of today seeing what could be done to make them functional again. So far I've got a decent #4 size plane of unknown manufacturer cleaned up and working well.
      MG likes this.

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      • #33

        Re: Tale of two chairs

        Talking about hand skills I was watching a Wolfe and Doucette video last night and as always came away amazed at their hand work. The only way to learn is by doing but it is a slow process. Like you I keep at it where practical.

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        • #34

          Re: Tale of two chairs

          Finished all the tenons finally. The lower side rails and stretcher have to to have the ends of the tenons chamfered since they intersect in the legs. Did a dry assembly to see how they looked.

          Also did the last of the arm glue ups. It'll be ready to come out of the form tomorrow. Then I will have to decide what to do with the form. Not sure If I want to have it kicking around taking up space, but otherwise its probably scrap. Just the cost of the job.
          beachburl likes this.

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          • #35

            Re: Tale of two chairs

            Ed,

            What resin glue did you use?

            The reason for this question is that I've been quite disappointed in the ones I've been using of late adn would like to see what others are now using.

            Thanks as well for sharing this interesting build with us. The journey's fun!!

            Originally posted by Ed in Calgary View Post
            More progress, finally got the resin glue to start on the bent lamination arms. It was stuck in the mail for an extra week. Got right to work with the first glue up. I recall a saying about too many clamps.
            Just have to repeat this process 24 times.
            All the best,

            Marty

            - Instagram: @apexwoodworks
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            Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc.

            My goal is not to be better than anyone else. My goal is to be better than I used to be.

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            • #36

              Re: Tale of two chairs

              I used the Dap Resin glue. I ordered a 1 lb tub from Aircraft Spruce which was sufficient for the four arms. I mixed 75g of the powder with 30 ml of water for each arm and it was just enough to get a good coat on each ply with no wasted glue.
              [email protected] likes this.

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              • #37

                Re: Tale of two chairs

                Just curious, why resin glue instead of others?
                John
                beachburl and John Bartley like this.
                If you learn from your mistakes, then I'm getting a fantastic education.

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                • #38

                  Re: Tale of two chairs

                  Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                  Just curious, why resin glue instead of others?
                  John
                  That would be my question also, especially for furniture for interior domestic use. I recently bought some Circa1860 Plastic Resin Glue to use to do a glue-up of Tamarack boards so that I can turn a couple of campfire stools for my niece's two kids, so I wanted waterproof glue, but otherwise?

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                  • #39

                    Re: Tale of two chairs

                    Originally posted by John Bartley View Post

                    That would be my question also, especially for furniture for interior domestic use. I recently bought some Circa1860 Plastic Resin Glue to use to do a glue-up of Tamarack boards so that I can turn a couple of campfire stools for my niece's two kids, so I wanted waterproof glue, but otherwise?
                    For bent laminations, Plastic resin glue is ideal as it isn't flexible like PVA glue. This means that the laminations retain their shape over the years, they don't slowly change radius as PVA glue does.

                    That said, when I made the chairs I steam bent the backs from 8mm QSWO, and allowed for spring back in the design, 18 years later the chair backs retain their accuracy.

                    Morris chairs are a lot of fun to make..

                    Ed, yours are looking very nice...........Regards, Rod.

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	Morris#6.jpg Views:	0 Size:	44.5 KB ID:	1309584 Click image for larger version  Name:	Morris#5.jpg Views:	0 Size:	43.1 KB ID:	1309585 Click image for larger version  Name:	Morris#3.jpg Views:	0 Size:	26.4 KB ID:	1309586 Click image for larger version  Name:	Morris#1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	29.2 KB ID:	1309587
                    Work is the curse of the riding class.

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                    • #40

                      Re: Tale of two chairs

                      What Rod said on the glue choice, but also it has a long working time which allows you to get the glue spread, the layers into the form and clamped before it tacks up too much. It does mean it needs to stay clamped for quite a while though, I've been giving it at least 24 hours. The instructions say it takes up to seven days to fully cure and reach it's maximum strength.

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                      • #41

                        Re: Tale of two chairs

                        Originally posted by Ed in Calgary View Post
                        What Rod said on the glue choice, but also it has a long working time which allows you to get the glue spread, the layers into the form and clamped before it tacks up too much. It does mean it needs to stay clamped for quite a while though, I've been giving it at least 24 hours. The instructions say it takes up to seven days to fully cure and reach it's maximum strength.
                        Thank you Ed (and Rod) !! I'll store that info away for future use. I hadn't considered anything other than the working environment of the finished product, but having a longer open working time would definitely be an asset during chair assembly.

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                        • #42

                          Re: Tale of two chairs

                          Yes thank you. Definitely useful I formation.
                          John
                          If you learn from your mistakes, then I'm getting a fantastic education.

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                          • #43

                            Re: Tale of two chairs

                            Post holidays progress. I did not spend much time in the shop over Christmas and New Years, my wife took some days off work and we spent time doing whatever things we were allowed to do during the lock-down. Lots of outdoors walking, some quiet celebrations at home with too much eating and maybe some libations now and then. It was a good break, but it's nice to get back at the project the last couple of days.

                            First up on the agenda was to make all the vertical slats and get them mortised and tenoned into the side rails. I did a bit different method on these mortises using my Mortise Pro router jig to make the initial mortise. I was debating on rounding vs squaring and opted for squaring the mortises this time using the mortising attachment on my drill press. I've never used it much as I never cared for the quality of the finished mortises. It leaves a rather rough cut, but worked fine to just clean out the corners. It was a lot faster than rounding all 32 tenons would have been.

                            Next up was to get the arm blanks finished up to size. I needed to get this job done today since my jointer is off to a new home tomorrow and the new combo jointer/planer is not due in for a couple weeks. One edge was jointed, then over to the table saw to rip to width with a cleanup pass over the jointer followed by cutting the ends for length. Having the arms done was key to the next job which was making a template to mark the legs for the through tenons for the arms and for cutting the upper rails. The through tenons are cut square and marked and the final fitting for the curve of the arm will be hand tool work.

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                            • #44

                              Re: Tale of two chairs

                              I am enjoying watching this progress.
                              Noel

                              "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
                              'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
                              "

                              John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

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                              • #45

                                Re: Tale of two chairs

                                Well my chisels have had a lot of use over the last week. First was finishing the tenons on the tops of the legs to match the arm curve. Then the next task was to tackle the mortises on the arms. I have to admit I was a bit apprehensive about doing those as there are a lot of complexities involved. The two mortises have to be perfectly positioned and each is at a different angle through the arm. A lot of careful transferring of the positions to mark out the mortise locations with little actual measurement ensured accuracy.

                                I started by boring out the majority of the material with a large forstner bit, then finished them off with the chisel. I was quite relieved after the first one was done a slipped down into place with little resistance. Not wanting celebrate too soon though, but the next three arms went almost as well. I did find a couple of spots on the leg tenons and top rails that needed to be finessed a bit more to better match the curvature of the respective arm.

                                Then I needed to decide what to do with the tops of the through tenons to fill the hole left by the mitered glue up construction. I decided that I did not want to have the glue joints of the miters visible so decided to trim the tenons short of the top face of the arms and then added a solid cap block that has a tenon to fit into the center hole. Once that was glued in and dry, the tops are beveled to the angles of the arms.

                                Following this, I started towards getting ready to glue things together. I'm doing one side at a time to keep the parts sorted. I finish sanded everything which removed all my orienting marks so doing all of them at once would leave too much of a puzzle at the end to keep the pieces sorted. One glue up done, three more to go.

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