Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tale of two chairs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46

    Re: Tale of two chairs

    the chairs are now taking up a lot more shop space. Over the past few days I've got the sides paired up to make the base frames. I also finished up getting the arms made. The last steps being drilling the holes for the adjusting pins and cutting the taper on the back ends. With the adjusting holes, I took a different approach in making some brass plates that are recessed into the sides of the arms. I like the idea of having a bit of hardware and felt the adjusting holes would be a place that could suffer wear and tear over years of use. The holes were drilled using the plates as guides to ensure perfect alignment. I made the plates from 1/8" brass, they are curved to match the profile of the arms. I plan to darken them with patina solution and hope to find some slotted oval head screws for a more traditional look. I also plan to use brass pins.

    The next step is attaching the support rails for the seat base cushion and getting the cushion frames made so those can go off to an upholsterer. I wanted to get that going so the cushions don't delay the chairs being finished.

    beachburl, Stuart Jacobs and 2 others like this.

    Comment

    • Thread Continues Below...

    • #47

      Re: Tale of two chairs

      Forgot to take pictures at the end of last week, so here's the progress up to Friday. I finished the assembly of both chair bases. That entailed getting the corbels made and attached and then gluing the arms on. Then it was on to getting the seat cushion frames made up and the support rails attached to the front and rear stretchers. I had a roll of webbing that was given to me a loooong time ago and this seemed a good use for it.

      We are now searching for an upholsterer and leather supplier to get the cushions made up.

      Today I started working on the backs getting all the parts cut to size and making templates for the curved back slats.


      Comment


      • #48

        Re: Tale of two chairs

        They look fabulous. I like the brass plate idea, it will provide a lot of added strength.

        Comment


        • #49

          Re: Tale of two chairs

          Progress today after a bit of a debacle yesterday. I was working on the backs for the chairs and after measuring and calculating determined the width required for the curved back slats. After a lunch break I got after cutting the blanks and as soon as I cut the last one I realized I screwed up. I had used the width for the slats between the sides and not the full length allowing for the tenons on each end. I had marked each measurement on the plans but went with the number that was stuck in my head. That left me with a big problem in how to fix the screw up. I decided that I would go with a floating tenon and after making the required mortises in the ends continued with the work of shaping the curved slats. at the end of the day I was less than pleased with the pieces. The mortises had little material to support them due to the curvature and thickness of the slats. I left it at that for the night and spent more than a few hours debating and mulling over the issue.

          So this morning I revisited the pieces and decided I that these chairs are intended to outlast the builder and a substandard joint on the backs that might fail was not acceptable. So, off the lumber store to get more material to remake the slats since I had none left in the thickness required. This afternoon the second round of slat making went much better and all of them are ready for final scraping and sanding.

          The one benefit of redoing them was to allow me to improve my methods for cutting and sanding the curves. Rather than bandsawing both faces of the curve at once. I did the back convex side first and sanded them to shape, then using a point guide on my bandsaw, cut the slats to rough width followed by a final sanding to smooth them. This process produced a much better consistent thickness.

          Next up will be to finish up the vertical side rails and get these together.

          Comment


          • #50

            Re: Tale of two chairs

            Ed... I feel your pain, been there & done that. Your resolution was that of a craftsman...... it must be done right! Roy
            Are you solving the problem, or becoming part of it?

            Comment


            • #51

              Re: Tale of two chairs

              I is so heartening to see I'm not the only one who measures once and cuts and cuts again.
              Very nice to ensure those who follow you will have quality furniture, not just 'good enough.'
              Noel

              "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
              'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
              "

              John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

              Comment

              • Thread Continues Below...

              • #52

                Re: Tale of two chairs

                Hey Ed, where do you buy your wood from? Black Forest has good selection, but is quite expensive. PJ White's prices are better, but is not really geared for a hobby woodworker.

                Comment


                • #53

                  Re: Tale of two chairs

                  I mostly buy from Black Forrest. I agree with your appraisal of them. They are good to deal with in general and usually have stock of the common species, but prices are premium. I do wish there were more hobby friendly options around here. I don't have room to store large volumes of wood for future use, so am stuck to buying smaller amounts on an as needed basis. Small volumes are not economical from more distant suppliers once shipping is factored in. I did buy a lot of the cherry for this chair from the "shorts" selection which runs a lot less per bf. Sadly no such option for the QS oak. FWIW, my screw up was nearly a $200 bill.

                  I have never personally shopped at PJ White but my Brother-in-law has and he likes them. His needs are typically more common grades and types of hardwood lumber and larger volumes for cabinet work. I may have to go shopping there sometime with him to see for myself.

                  Comment


                  • #54

                    Re: Tale of two chairs

                    Ouch! But I know what you mean. You gotta do it right.

                    I've bought several times from PJ. Their market is definitely the commercial shops. I got 150 bf of hard maple for my workbench there for only $1.90/bf. It was 4/4 with a fair bit of mineral streaking. Lots of milling & glue up work, but I enjoy that sort of thing. Not a lot of waste though. I always buy Baltic birch there because their prices are best. Same with Medex, when I have to use MDF for something.

                    I've also bought other hardwoods there, and they do allow picking, but you get the feeling that you shouldn't be spending hours going through the whole pile. I just be sure to neatly restack the lumber so as not to wear out my welcome.

                    Comment


                    • #55

                      Re: Tale of two chairs

                      Yes some mistakes can be fixed, some just need to be re-done. I am tossing about a couple of ideas to re-purpose the first sets of slats in new projects. Also have and idea for the off cut pieces from the slats. If these work out I may be able to make a couple of bucks to offset the cost.

                      Comment


                      • #56

                        Re: Tale of two chairs

                        We all do the same thing Ed. I personally like my scrap to be milled into interesting shapes, cut to length, and if possible, have joints cut before I throw them into the BTU file.

                        Comment

                        • Thread Continues Below...

                        • #57

                          Re: Tale of two chairs

                          With the success of the second attempt at the back slats, the back rails were mortised and both backs assembled after the final sanding of the parts. The curve of the slats and the relative thinness means they would bow with clamping pressure so there needs to be a spacer block between the rails for clamping. And of course the masking of all the pieces to keep the glue squeeze out minimized.

                          To continue with the use of brass, I made the support pins for the backs from 1/2" brass rod. I turned some grooves in the ends to help the glue hold better for the wood caps. The wood caps are drilled and then held on with epoxy. The pivot pins I ended up making from steel drill rod since I failed to get enough brass rod. No big deal as those are pretty much never seen once together. I did make the spacers from brass as well though. The pivot pins are threaded and I used a 3/8" EZ-Lok insert in the chair leg for them to screw into. The original design just uses a straight pin that slips into place, but I figured having it secured was better. Those got the same treatment with the epoxied on caps.

                          And with that, the back are on and the chairs are now fully built and ready for final finishing work. But first, footstools.

                          Comment


                          • #58

                            Re: Tale of two chairs

                            Looking good I did that same chair a few years ago out of Red Oak. Cost was a bit less than yours because I got the logs for free and had a guy bandsaw them then air dried
                            I did the legs a bit different as I glued them up out of about 3/4 thick pieces and then cut and glued 1/8 thick veneer on the glued edges rather than the box mitres
                            I just built it from the magazine plan rather than buying the proper ones.
                            It was a really fun project and I know your pain about fitting the leg tennons to arm mortices...yikes.
                            I just carved pegs for the seat back. The brass would be really neat but I'm cheap

                            One thing. Do not follow the plans on the cushions. Super uncomfortable. They need more thickness and softness. Ask somebody with knowhow
                            Good luck with it, looks great so far
                            Dara
                            SPCHT

                            Comment


                            • #59

                              Re: Tale of two chairs

                              I use floating tenons frequently and have used them as you thought to do after a cutting mistake. You absolutely made the right call in re-doing as there was not enough wood for proper support in this case.

                              Comment


                              • #60

                                Re: Tale of two chairs

                                Originally posted by Dara View Post

                                One thing. Do not follow the plans on the cushions. Super uncomfortable. They need more thickness and softness. Ask somebody with knowhow
                                Good luck with it, looks great so far
                                I agree with this 100%! My morris chair looks great, but not very comfortable, cushions are too hard. My inlaws have a commercially made morris chair that I could sit in all day. I gave my morris chair to my parents when I moved and told them to get it reupholstered with new cushions but they hardly ever sit in it so never went through with it.

                                The brass plate and rod are a nice touch.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X