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  • Crack control

    Click image for larger version  Name:	070ED748-D873-4CDD-85C0-46565D00DB9B.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	46.4 KB ID:	1348664 A buddy has this big piece of pine stump. He wants to make a very rustic little side table from it. He wants me to do something to reinforce the two large cracks. The repair would be on the underside. What would you all do?
    Bow tie inlay? If so how big? How thick? The stump is about 3” thick and 20” in diameter.
    Last edited by Randy in Calgary; 11-23-2021, 10:34 PM.
    Cheers
    Randy
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  • #2

    Re: Crack control

    I have 2 yew chopping boards we have always used to serve pizza on they are about 3/4" thick they are very dry and they were cracked just like your pieces I filled the cracks with some thick coloured epoxy within days they cracked again in a different place.
    We all know that wood cracks radiating out from the pith, I don't know what your answer is you could try router in a disc of ply on the under side so its not seen and a few dots of pva or a mastic that will allow it to move ???????????

    By the way, I left the cracks in my yew and I just live with it.
    Last edited by bkrits; 11-24-2021, 03:20 AM. Reason: Last line

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    • #3

      Re: Crack control

      My first thought was steel.

      The legs/apron could be made of steel, and designed in such a way that they both hold up the table and stabilze the stump. Slots for the fasteners, of course.

      Then for a different idea I thought, depending on his style, maybe do sepaeate steel braces on the top side - maybe in something of a steampunk style - and turn them into a design element.

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      • #4

        Re: Crack control

        Basic rule is that wood likes to move and restricting the current cracks will likely just create new ones as was mentioned. I like Bob's idea of making a base conforming to the shape and some and a flexible method of securing it. Essentially, making the pine slice a decorative surface on top of the underlying plywood table. Given it's size it should be quite stable sitting on the ply and maybe just a dowel pin in a blind hole in the centre might be enough to locate it securely enough on the ply base.
        billh

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        • #5

          Re: Crack control

          Originally posted by Randy in Calgary View Post
          Click image for larger version Name:	070ED748-D873-4CDD-85C0-46565D00DB9B.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	46.4 KB ID:	1348664

          A buddy has this big piece of pine stump. He wants to make a very rustic little side table from it. He wants me to do something to reinforce the two large cracks. The repair would be on the underside. What would you all do?
          Bow tie inlay? If so how big? How thick? The stump is about 3” thick and 20” in diameter.
          Randy no answer on your reinforcing, it won't work.

          If the slab is really dry you could cut the split out and glue it back together, that way you eliminate tension that's still there.

          I drew some lines on the slab, first cut it in half, then cut the half with the second largest split in it, and take out the split, glue that back together.

          Then straighten the two halves and glue that back together, that way you have a slab that might stay like that or maybe have the other splits open up a bit more later, but the large split has been eliminated.

          Other than that, just live with it, looks pretty rustic like that .

          Click image for larger version

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          Have fun and take care
          Leo Van Der Loo

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          • #6

            Re: Crack control

            Thanks for the replies so far guys. I should have mentioned that he intends to keep the cracks visible. The only concern is that they are getting close to converging and the top is weak.
            I know he is planning on steel legs so I will get them and try to kill two birds with one stone provided the attachment method is such that it can reinforce the cracks as well as hold up the top.
            Cheers
            Randy

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            • #7

              Re: Crack control

              by the way, when I first saw this thread title I thought it was going to be about plumbers.
              LeftFinger, Redneck Albertan and 6 others like this.

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              • #8

                Re: Crack control

                I liked this table top and legs done with a cracked crosscut slab found on youtube.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQO2VZzHrkE

                Paul

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                • #9

                  Re: Crack control

                  Originally posted by Randy in Calgary View Post
                  Thanks for the replies so far guys. I should have mentioned that he intends to keep the cracks visible. The only concern is that they are getting close to converging and the top is weak.
                  I know he is planning on steel legs so I will get them and try to kill two birds with one stone provided the attachment method is such that it can reinforce the cracks as well as hold up the top.
                  That does makes a big difference of course, you can bolt/screw the metal legs to the bottom and leave it as is.

                  Have fun and take care
                  Leo Van Der Loo

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                  • #10

                    Re: Crack control

                    Bowties are my favourite method of repairing and supporting cracks like that. You didn't mention how dry the piece is. Unless it is fully dry and stable, no repair will be effective. I don't know if there is any science on the size of bowties or the depth to be effective. I usually choose about 1/3 of the thickness of the piece and long/wide enough to be visually appealing.
                    The difference between a master and a beginner: The master has failed more times than the beginner has even tried.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Crack control

                      Originally posted by Randy in Calgary View Post
                      Thanks for the replies so far guys. I should have mentioned that he intends to keep the cracks visible. The only concern is that they are getting close to converging and the top is weak.
                      I know he is planning on steel legs so I will get them and try to kill two birds with one stone provided the attachment method is such that it can reinforce the cracks as well as hold up the top.
                      A couple of questions crossed my mind;
                      - will the table be used inside or out?
                      - does he care if the reinforcement is visible as long as it's attractive?
                      - will the table be in a reasonably stable environment?
                      - will he be filling the crack with summat like an epoxy? or will they be left open?

                      My suggestion would have been to drill the end of the cracks just like you would with cast iron and glue in dowels, then if appearance is an issue, use the Bowties on the upper surface before filling the remainder with epoxy? If the cracks are to remain open, do the same but put the bowies as big and as close to outer rim as possible?

                      .... just some thoughts ....

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                      • #12

                        Re: Crack control

                        maybe you could start drilling holes perpendicular to the grain ( sideways) and insert dowels or wood or steel , bury them in there with some runign across each crack. Fill the gaps with epoxy and wood dust. still might crack but if it's all pinned together in different directions it wont fall apart, maybe soak the whole thing in epoxy after.

                        if you want sort of steampunkt style you can buy some black iron and a bunch of elbows and get creative like that to make legs.. they also have these attachmet things, they sort of look like big washers but cast iron parts. have pipe thread inside and 4 countersunk holes to hold them down, you might see them used in railings and things. they could be good to attach with or maybe for feet.

                        I recently saw some lawn chairs all made of iron pipe fittings, They looked quite nice actually.

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