Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Woodworking Cinematography

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Woodworking Cinematography

    Gavin's recent thread got me, and I am sure, others, thinking about cinematography in woodworking videos. Gavin's video hit a sweet spot for me - a video showing some highlights of a build set to music. As it is not an instructional video, once can be a lot more creative with their videos.

    Anybody have any other examples of this sort of thing? My favorite by Brandon Morrison can be found here.



    Looks like I am a sucker for shallow DOF.

    I think that Brandon uses a Canon 7D. I've been looking into an SLR with video capabilities, and realize it may trump some of my other tool desires. I currently have a Canon Rebel XTi and a 40D, both of an age before video hit SLRs. While a used 5D MKii would be ideal for that shallow DOF, I have a mix of EF and EF-S lenses, so I am thinking the 7D\60D\T3i router. Part of me says to go with the T3i if all I want is the video capabilities, while the part that wants to take still photos says go with the 7D.

    I know that there are some skilled photographers in this crowd. Anyone have any recommendations for a video-capable SLR for the purpose of woodworking videos?

    Thanks,
    Nate
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: Woodworking Cinematography

    Re: Woodworking Cinematrography

    Hi Nate,

    I have been doing my first videos over the last year with a Canon 60D. I'm far from an expert. As I have been getting more serious about the topic I've collected a few interesting videos from other people over the past few months that you might like. They are more about making things, than working wood. I know this isn't exactly what you asked about, but it's all I can offer you.

    http://vimeo.com/28673785

    http://vimeo.com/78788086

    EDIT:

    A few others....

    http://vimeo.com/37360333

    http://vimeo.com/38165983
    Last edited by Rob Brown; 02-22-2014, 08:44 PM.
    ______________________________________________
    Rob Brown
    Editor - Canadian Woodworking & Home Improvement

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Woodworking Cinematography

      Re: Woodworking Cinematrography

      Thanks Rob. I remember your thread from a while back.

      How do you like the 60D? What would you say its limitations have been for video? Are you comfortable yet sharing anything you have done with it?
      Thanks,
      Nate

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Woodworking Cinematography

        Re: Woodworking Cinematrography

        Its limitations are ME, Nate! I would love to get into the video thing on a big scale, but there are only so many hours in a day.

        The Canon 60D had been pretty good for me. I'm sure it's got more than I will ever need, and the quality is quite good. There may be some Nikon people out there who disagree, and would recommend a Nikon, but that debate will never end.
        ______________________________________________
        Rob Brown
        Editor - Canadian Woodworking & Home Improvement

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Woodworking Cinematography

          Re: Woodworking Cinematrography

          Your DoF or Bokeh is a function of your lens more than the body. Shoot with a low F-stop and keep the object close to the lens and the background far away and you should get great bokeh. I use a 50mm f1.4 with a 5Diii for portraits and get great bokeh following this setup. Video should be no different. For shooting in a shop environment, I would think something in a 30-35mm range with an f1.4 would be ideal. 50mm may be too long.

          I started with an XSi, then 7d, and to the 5diii last summer. The 7D is a phenomenal camera for video or photos. Loved it, used mostly for sports and wildlife, some portraits. If you can find a 7D, you won't be disappointed.

          No experience with cinema lenses, and not sure how economical it would be for me to even google it. May cause bankruptcy.
          "Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils."

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Woodworking Cinematography

            Re: Woodworking Cinematrography

            Yeah, the look of the bokeh definitely comes from the lens, but I would argue that your full-frame 5Diii with its much larger sensor can create depth of field shallow enough to make you bleed that my crop sensor can't touch.

            I have a Canon 17-55 EFS that I think will work for now in the shop, with a 2.8 100mm Macro to get real close. Faster would be nice for video.

            I agree about Googling causing bankruptcy. I spent a good chunk of Sunday looking into video stuff. I now know what I would like if cost was not an object. I'll file it away with my desired European sliding table saw and monster jointer and planer.

            Ended up finding a 7D locally for about the price of a Mirka Ceros and some sandpaper. So far, it blows my 40D out of the water and I think I will be quite happy with it. I think it should do what I need it to.

            (Stupid slippery slope of getting back into photography... Why did I pick two expensive hobbies to get into?)

            -Nate

            Originally posted by Max In Sudbury View Post
            Your DoF or Bokeh is a function of your lens more than the body. Shoot with a low F-stop and keep the object close to the lens and the background far away and you should get great bokeh. I use a 50mm f1.4 with a 5Diii for portraits and get great bokeh following this setup. Video should be no different. For shooting in a shop environment, I would think something in a 30-35mm range with an f1.4 would be ideal. 50mm may be too long.

            I started with an XSi, then 7d, and to the 5diii last summer. The 7D is a phenomenal camera for video or photos. Loved it, used mostly for sports and wildlife, some portraits. If you can find a 7D, you won't be disappointed.

            No experience with cinema lenses, and not sure how economical it would be for me to even google it. May cause bankruptcy.

            Comment

            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: Woodworking Cinematography

              Re: Woodworking Cinematrography

              Hi, my first post here. This is very appealing to my eye.

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                Originally posted by Flawless Cowboy View Post
                Gavin's recent thread got me, and I am sure, others, thinking about cinematography in woodworking videos. Gavin's video hit a sweet spot for me - a video showing some highlights of a build set to music. As it is not an instructional video, once can be a lot more creative with their videos.
                I probably couldn't guess half the acronyms you said haha but it gave me a warm fuzzy feeling reading that. Enough so that I was inspired to start another project last night. I've got what I think is a pretty neat idea....stay tuned for that!!!

                I was thinking of making shorter videos through out the process of the build (Simular to the first video thread I did a few months ago) then either compiling the whole build into about a 10-15 minute long film for hardcore fans or possibly just making a short highlights clip for those with short attention spans haha....or maybe both?

                I just wish I had a better camera...
                "To become an able and successful man in any profession, three things are necessary, nature, study and practice."Henry Ward Beecher

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                  Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                  Originally posted by TheYoungTurner View Post
                  I just wish I had a better camera...
                  Gavin, the camera doesn't compose the shot or decide the subject matter, it is just another tool. I think your videos are great, just like the projects you are doing. You are a man of many talents.
                  I'm only responsible for what i say, not for what you understand.

                  If you can't fix it with a hammer, You have an electrical problem.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                    Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                    Originally posted by Nicholas View Post
                    Hi, my first post here. This is very appealing to my eye.
                    Welcome, Nicholas!

                    Nice video. Gives me some ideas of some things to try. The lighting in that video even matches my shop (sigh...).

                    Originally posted by TheYoungTurner View Post
                    I probably couldn't guess half the acronyms you said haha but it gave me a warm fuzzy feeling reading that. Enough so that I was inspired to start another project last night. I've got what I think is a pretty neat idea....stay tuned for that!!!

                    I was thinking of making shorter videos through out the process of the build (Simular to the first video thread I did a few months ago) then either compiling the whole build into about a 10-15 minute long film for hardcore fans or possibly just making a short highlights clip for those with short attention spans haha....or maybe both?

                    I just wish I had a better camera...
                    Looking forward to it!

                    Truth be told, I think the videos for the short attention spans are best. I think that multiple videos for a project would be the way to go.

                    -Nate

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                      Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                      Nice video and work but you're getting your hands and fingers way too close to the cutters on your router table. You really need some push blocks.

                      I was cringing watching that.

                      Chris

                      Comment

                      • Thread Continues Below...

                      • #12

                        Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                        Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                        Frank Howarth has some pretty interesting videos, here's one of them.

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPL3kJPsVdA

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                          Re: Woodworking Cinematography

                          Originally posted by blackgold View Post
                          Frank Howarth has some pretty interesting videos, here's one of them.

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPL3kJPsVdA
                          That is ridiculously cool

                          My projects take long enough... I can't imagine planning that out and stop-animating the process... I'd never finish!

                          --Jeff

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X