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Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

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  • Hand Tool Build - scraper shave



    I was away on holidays for the first half of August, so I'm late joining up for the hand tool build. And with a short timeline, I need to choose an easy (or at least fast) project to get it done by the 31st. One of those Krenov-style planes would fit the bill, only takes an evening to make one of those, but I got so many planes already I have no need for another. How about a small scraper shave? There's some metal work involved, but not too much, quite doable in the time I have to work on the project. And they make great Xmas gifts too.

    First I needed some bar stock, no problem, as I have a big bronze bar I picked up at a re-use centre years ago. It was part of a door handle from some kind of grand old building. I've been cutting bits off once in a while for various projects but there's still lots left. The bar is 3/8 by inch-and-a-half, so I ripped a 2 1/2 inch piece off the side. I used my Big hacksaw, which is a 24" meat saw frame with a piece of metal-cutting bandsaw blade mounted in it. Took about 10 minutes to excise the piece I wanted from the bar.

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    Then it was on to the file work to square up the blank. I used a huge milled-tooth file I got from Doug Orr at the Tools of the Trade sale. He always has really amazing stuff. Once I had the piece of bronze squared up I laid out the cuts I wanted. Tabs on the end for the mounting screws, and the mouth area for shaving escapement. I roughed out the tabs with a standard hacksaw, followed by a bastard file. No need for anything smoother as these parts are not visible (buried in the stock). The mouth area was first roughed out with a series of cuts with a small coarse round file. I find that this makes the work go much faster than a flat file. The milled tooth file was used to level the mouth, followed by a bastard file, then a mill file and finally a second cut which left a nice polished surface.

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    Time to select some wood for the stock. I rummaged through the offcut bin (which was much reduced by the clean-up I did before the Galoot BBQ) and found a nice piece of air dried walnut from my 2012 Galootaclaus. Perfect! I sketched the rough outline on the wood and bandsawed it to shape. Then I laid the mouth block on the stock and traced the cutout for the throat. I sawed this out with a dovetail saw and a coping saw to remove the bulk of the waste. I used a big paring chisel to bring the throat opening down to the line. I ended up using a Stanley router plane to correct my wacky paring cuts (oops!).

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    Once I had the block seated in the throat I could scribe around the mounting tabs. I used a small flush-cut saw and a very thin 1/4 inch paring chisel to clear the waste and fit the bock all the way into the stock. Then I centre-punched the locations for the mounting screws. Off to the post drill to drill the holes. I was distracted halfway through the job, had to help my wife shove some of her lumber through the bandsaw and thickness planer, and I missed the mark on my second hole. Oh well, it won't affect the function, it's just cosmetic. In hindsight I should have used a centre-drill to start these holes, would have improved the accuracy.

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    I filed off the burrs from the drilling, put the block into the walnut body, and then drilled the holes the rest of the way through the stock. Time to fit the nuts. These are inlaid on the other side of the stock. I used a small carving chisel to do this. Then I took a scrap of scraper stock and gave the shave a test run. It works OK, so it's time to make the stock comfortable and shapely. That will be for my next bit of shop time.

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    --
    Oakville ON
    Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User
    Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User
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  • #2

    Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

    Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

    Finished the shave tonight.

    I used a shallow carving gouge and a rasp to clean up the worst of the bumps and refine the shape. Then I used a series of files to smooth it, and finally some 320 grit sandpaper. That's smooth enough for my hands. I swabbed it down with some boiled linseed oil. The blade is a scrap of old saw blade. The business end has been lapped to get the rust and dirt off, then I drawfiled a bevel on it and ran it across a fine diamond plate to get a good edge.

    I will have to use it a bit more to fine tune it. It doesn't clog (Yay!!) but it also won't pull up the kind of shavings I want. Maybe the blade needs a burr on it. After a few times around the block it should be fine, but That's enough for tonight.

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    Darrell
    Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User

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    • #3

      Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

      Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

      Very very nice.
      Egon
      from
      The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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      • #4

        Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

        Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

        Very nice Darrell!

        Have you had the chance to take it around the block a few times yet? Let us know how the fine-tuning is going.
        ______________________________________________
        Rob Brown
        Editor - Canadian Woodworking & Home Improvement

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        • #5

          Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

          Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

          Hey Rob,

          I haven't had time to try it out beyond a few test cuts as yet. Too much time getting that last bit of summer time - this week is supposed to be hot and sunny, and I am going to enjoy as much of it as I can outside instead of in the shop.

          Darrell
          Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User

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          • #6

            Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

            Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

            I did finally manage to test it out, scraping the finish off the edges of some slats for outdoor benches. Talk about a torture test! The stuff is dirty and nasty and hard as concrete (some kind of commercial finish). I ended up having to turn a hook on the scraper blade to get it to deal with this nasty stuff. Some wear is evident on the sole but the tool was working great. I have another dozen of these planks to deal with, so the tool will be well broken-in (or maybe just broken) by the time that job is done.

            Darrell
            Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User

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            • #7

              Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

              Re: Hand Tool Build - scraper shave

              Wow that looks great

              The second pic looks almost like a guitar bridge....hmm....solid bronze acoustic bridge....

              Nathan

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