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A new marking knife

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  • jpcfortress
    replied
    Re: A new marking knife

    Mark,

    There is some flex, but a shorter blade would take care of much of the flex. As for the feel in the hand, I haven't used it much, but I've been able to feel that the handle is too short. That's why I would keep the overall length and shorten the blade if (when) I make another one.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusty
    replied
    Re: A new marking knife

    The chisel would be good for sure Chris. I flattened and sharpened an old Stanley awl once and it was solid but I dropped it and lost it. It was just ok so I wasn't heartbroken when I lost it. My buddy made one out of a gasket scraper and I really liked it. It had that bent angle on it and a fairly large handle.

    With the steak knife thing I thought a flexible one was the quest, and a sawzall blade might work too.

    Leave a comment:


  • flairwoodworks
    replied
    Re: A new marking knife

    Originally posted by Rusty View Post
    Maybe try a sawzall blade next time if you find it flexes too much. It might be a little stiffer. I'm not sure cause I don't have the old knife to compare.
    When designing my marking knife, I did look at a reciprocating saw blade but they are actually quite flexible - likely considerably more so than a steak knife. My repurposed chisel is nice and rigid!

    Leave a comment:


  • flairwoodworks
    replied
    Re: A new marking knife

    Hi Jason,

    Nice looking handle, and knife, too. I like to choke up on my marking knives as much as possible, so I prefer small, lightweight handles and as little of the exposed blade sharpened as possible. In my shop, a knife of your design would be more of a utility/carving knife than a marking knife. If you wanted a shorter blade, you could simply cut the blade shorter still...

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusty
    replied
    Re: A new marking knife

    Maybe try a sawzall blade next time if you find it flexes too much. It might be a little stiffer. I'm not sure cause I don't have the old knife to compare.

    Handle wise I might taper it close to the blade to get closer into the tight spots.

    BTW a box cutter knife with the long break off blades will work real well in a pinch.

    Personally I would only sharpen the tip but the way you've done it you have a very useable knife blade.

    Leave a comment:


  • iguana
    replied
    Re: A new marking knife

    That's a nice looking knife - how does it feel in your hand?

    I've made a few marking and chip carving knives - I've learned that sharpening is the last thing you do :-)

    There's nothing wrong with a long blade on a marking knife as the long blade can serve a purpose (e.g., see Chris Wong's). But the key is that the blade doesn't flex when you put pressure on the tip. How does yours do?

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  • jpcfortress
    replied
    Re: A new marking knife

    I've completed the knife! Here's the rest of the process:

    I shaped the handle to a little bigger than the original handle. I wanted a little more meat in my hands. The dimensions I worked down to with my plane were " thick, " tall and 4" long. I rounded all the corners and rounded the back end to fit into the heel of my palm. I also profiled a curve into the bottom of the knife-mostly aesthetic. I did all this with files and smoothed out the corners with a scraper; finally I ran some sandpaper over it. For a finish, I applied beeswax. In this next picture, I'm ready to epoxy the blade into place:
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    It's sharp:
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    Here's the finished handle:
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    And the entire knife:
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    The blade protrudes from the handle about 2" making an overall length of 6".

    Confession time: nearly every project has some kind of boo-boo or mistake (isn't that half the fun of woodworking?). When I glued the top and bottom on, I didn't want too much glue to get into the blade cavity, so I put only a little on. After I unclamped it, the top spread open - apparently I hadn't put enough glue on. When I epoxied the blade in, I immediately used the blade to prop open the top so I could spread some more glue inside. I clamped it and it held: mistake fixed.

    I also cut myself a few times with the blade. Did I say it was sharp? Thankfully, there were no major cuts.

    Things I would do differently next time:
    1. The biggest thing that stood out for me when I came to completing the knife was how far the blade protruded from the handle. I probably should have inserted it deeper. So I would go for a shorter blade.

    2. However, I do like the overall length at 6". So I would go for a longer handle and shorter blade to keep the length the same.

    3. I would also like to explore different handle shapes and how that would affect use.

    4. I would say my blade polishing skills need a little work.

    Any criticisms? How would you consider making a knife and handle? Suggestions welcome.

    Thanks for reading.

    Leave a comment:


  • jpcfortress
    started a topic A new marking knife

    A new marking knife

    For my project I decided to make a marking knife based on the suggestions on the web page for this hand tool build event. Previously, I was using a pieces of a 3/4" bandsaw blade that I had sharpened; but there was no handle for it and the corners were sharp. I then bought the Veritas marking knife, but the point didn't hold up very well for me. So I thought I would make my own now. This event is a good excuse for it too. I started with an old steak knife whose handle had cracked:
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    I cut the rivets off and proceeded to sharpen the blade so that I would have a flat blade instead of the serrated one. I started on my water stones and made some progress, but I was getting impatient, so I got out my Dremel tool and ground some down:
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    After that, I went back to the waterstones to sharpen it to too sharp.... I used the side of my waterstones so that I could hold onto both ends of the blade and so have more control over my sharpening:
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    Only after I was satisfied with the sharpened blade, I cut off the end of the blade with a cutting disc on my Dremel:
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    The completed blade (with the cutoff):
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    On to the handle. As I was making the blade, I thought about different handle designs. I wanted to use contrasting woods, so I thought it might be interesting to make a shape of a hand plane; but then thought that that might compromise the strength of the handle. I also thought about doing a diagonal pattern. In the end, I went for stripes along the length of the handle. I've seen that kind of detail elsewhere and quite liked it.
    So I found some walnut and maple and cut out rough blanks of each:
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    (note the original handle for comparison in length)

    I made the main wood the walnut; I wanted the maple to be sandwiched on each side of the centre piece of walnut, like so:
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    Before I cut these pieces, I planed the one side so that I wouldn't have to plane the thin stock. The only one of these pieces that I had to hold individually was the centre one, but it wasn't the thinnest one either, so it wasn't bad at all.
    I then glued the three centre pieces:
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    Once this was glued up, I planed both sides (because I didn't plane the outsides yet...)
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    and before I glued up the other two pieces, I cut the slot for the blade. My kerf was a a little too tight for my blade, so I nibbled away at the sides of the slot with my saw and got a nice slip fit:
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    As you can see, The blade was just a little wider than the the part so far, so I laid the other side on a piece of melamine, put the bottom piece on it and hit it with a rubber mallet to indicate where the slot should be. I deepened it with my saw and the corner of a thicker scraper so that I could slide the knife in again after it was all glued up and shaped.
    Here you can see the mark made by hitting the piece on the protruding part of the blade:
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    I glued up the two outer pieces with the blade in place so that the slot lined up. Once it was all clamped up, I pulled the blade out and let it dry.
    It should be dry enough now to start shaping it to the final shape. All going well, I should be able to finish today yet.
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