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Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

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  • Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

    A continuation of this thread https://forum.canadianwoodworking.co...ers-experience

    Yesterday I had the ceiling insulated to R40. There was marginal heat saving going to R40 from R26 but the added cost was not significant so I went for it. I thought it worthwhile to max out the insulation where possible because I am not sure about the walls. The cost was just under $1,100 before taxes and as stated in the first post the space is 750 sq ft. I have also installed an infrared heater like this one https://www.veito.ca/product/veito-b...-heater-black/. I actually bought it from Canadian Tire because they have a generous return policy so if it doesn't work out I am covered.
    So I have a 4,800 watt electric heater and the infrared. How well does this work you ask. I have not had an opportunity to run them for an extended period of time but on a preliminary observation basis things look not too bad. I really like the infrared heater as it delivers instant heat to my work bench area. I have it mounted about 7.5 feet high facing the bench and maybe 6 feet from the bench on the diagonal downwards. The radiant heat extends to a fairly wide area - actually better than I thought it would. The electric heater is behind me on the opposite wall, maybe 8 feet away. There is a large air filter at ceiling height to help circulate the air.
    When I went out to the shop this morning it was 2C and breezy. The shop was 5C inside. Within an hour with the heaters running the temp inside was 10C. After 1.5 hours it was 14C. Tomorrow I will take some measurements over a longer period and try to see how high these heaters will push the temp.
    So clearly the insulation is making a huge difference over no insulation. I like the infrared because it is economical and I can see me using it alone when it is a bit cool and some added heat is nice. It also has the advantage of being instant so if I am out there for a short time I can flip it on and not have to wait for the other heater.
    The next step is deciding if I want to go with a propane furnace but I want to talk to friend first who has a similar sized shop with propane.
    Last edited by dwoody; 03-30-2018, 06:29 PM.
    Les Groeller and Matt Matt like this.
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  • #2

    Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

    Good to read this.
    Remember, we are here to share, learn, and enjoy. Relax.

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    • #3

      Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

      Thats awesome.
      https://www.facebook.com/gregsreinventions2016/

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      • #4

        Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

        One of the things about heated vs unheated (or periodically heated shops) is impact on tools and equipment as well as supplies (finishing materials, glues etc) that are temperature-sensitive. I've always had both a heated and an unheated shop so I could use either in warm weather seasons but kept what I needed in the basement shop in winter. Since moving I have 1 shop which I haven't yet fully insulated or installed a heating system so it's been cold and unpleasant spending much time in the shop this winter. I expect it's hard on tools and equipment having any plastic components and also those items affected by expansion and contraction on metal parts. It's also a pain carrying stuff into the basement to a storage area when not in use. I suppose once I get around to heating it I will experiment with value/cost of setting back the heating temperature vs turning off when not in use and/or putting a mini-shop in the heated basement.. just a decent bench and rudimentary tooling for use in the colder temperatures.
        I'm not sure how well the radiantly heated shops compare to other forms of heating because IIRC they tend to heat the article rather than the air. They may be much less expensive to operate

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        • #5

          Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

          You are correct that cycling warm/cold is hard on tools, mostly due to condensation issues. In terms of heating efficiency electricity is 100% efficient because no heat goes out a chimney. It makes no difference what type of electric heater, if it draws 1kw it heats 1kw. By going to a heat pump you can leverage that 1kw into more than 1kw worth of heat and these days with mini split AC units so cheap that can be a great option for people in southern Ontario who do not have access to gas.

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          • #6

            Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

            Rick I have a mini-shop in my basement for hand work and finishing. I built a scaled down version of my main shop work bench so I have a heavy duty work surface for heavy duty hand work etc. I have been heating my shop only when I am using it for over thirty years. I have not observed any significant problems with condensation causing rust, premature equipment failure or anything negative really. But that's my experience, with my tools and equipment and I can see there might be problems in a different setting. So far I am pleased with my infrared heater operating in a range around 0 to 5C. I have no illusions about minus 15. Based on my shop time I don't see heating the shop all the time as economically sensible but I will confess as I get older I am more inclined to opt for comfort and convenience and turn a blind eye to the money part.

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            • #7

              Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

              Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
              You are correct that cycling warm/cold is hard on tools, mostly due to condensation issues. In terms of heating efficiency electricity is 100% efficient because no heat goes out a chimney. It makes no difference what type of electric heater, if it draws 1kw it heats 1kw. By going to a heat pump you can leverage that 1kw into more than 1kw worth of heat and these days with mini split AC units so cheap that can be a great option for people in southern Ontario who do not have access to gas.
              We have a heat pump supported by a propane furnace as our primary heating for the house. Your idea of a mini-split is interesting and worth looking into for the shop. It may be over kill for 750 sq ft but I will have a look. Thanks.

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              • #8

                Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

                So I went out to the shop this morning to get bird feed for the feeders and it was minus 10C outside. The inside of the shop was 1C so the insulation is doing the job. Prior to the insulation it would have been much colder.

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                • #9

                  Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

                  Dennis don't forget it works both ways. It can hold cold in as well. If it turns out to be warmer outside than it is in your shop, open the doors and capture some of the heat. Then the insulation may retain it.
                  "Do it Right!"

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                  • #10

                    Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

                    I should put a thermometer on the other half of the building that has no insulation as a test and monitor the temperature difference for a while. Rusty you are so right. I open the man door and overhead door to quickly get a temperature change.The concrete floor is a giant heat sink that maintains a temperature for a long time so it works both positively and negatively as well.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

                      Don't forget when you do that though you are putting a lot of moisture in the shop to help the rustification out.
                      https://www.facebook.com/gregsreinventions2016/

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                      • #12

                        Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

                        Originally posted by Greg from K/W View Post
                        Don't forget when you do that though you are putting a lot of moisture in the shop to help the rustification out.
                        Yes, it has to be a dry day or the condensation is immediate.

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                        • #13

                          Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

                          Originally posted by dwoody View Post

                          Yes, it has to be a dry day or the condensation is immediate.
                          Yes, I can confirm that too and I'm glad Greg posted about it. In the spring before the floor in my shop gets warmed thru, all I have to do is open the garage door and the concrete slab floor is instantly covered in condensation, and that's even after keeping the garage air at +10'C all winter.

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                          • #14

                            Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

                            LOL That's why I've been telling you Ontarians to get a radiant tube heater to warm the slab. Humour me!
                            "Do it Right!"

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                            • #15

                              Re: Electric Infrared heaters - Experience??? UPDATE

                              Originally posted by Rusty View Post
                              LOL That's why I've been telling you Ontarians to get a radiant tube heater to warm the slab. Humour me!
                              Ummm ... Nope! I've worked under those things thank you. I have an eight foot ceiling and I prefer to get my February sunburns in Cuba. They aren't for everyone ....

                              Although, when I worked in the cabinet shop about ten years ago we transitioned from forced air wood/oil to the radiant tube heat and the radiant tubes did a fantastic job of drying contact cement quickly when we were doing laminate jobs! They have their place.....just not in my garage.

                              cheers

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