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Sudden Rust Infestation!

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  • callee
    started a topic Sudden Rust Infestation!

    Sudden Rust Infestation!

    I was in the shop working a hard day yesterday, finishing up two orders that were going for install today.

    Today I was up, loaded the trailer, and went out to site to deliver and install.

    Just an hour ago I get back home and visit the shop just to grab some papers. As I'm walking towards the bench I absent-mindedly run my hand across the jointer, as I often do, I guess I'm just a tactile person, but right away I notice something feels wrong. I stop and look down, and the entire jointer bed is covered in this fine, fine covering of red rust!! It looks like someone came in and lightly covered it with a plant mister or something and then left it to rust. I was aghast, and right away ran over to the shelf to grab some cleaner and steel wool. It's on the way there I start to clue into the size of the problem: it wasn't just the jointer- it was every single cast iron surface in the shop!!! They weren't like this yesterday, but today, POOF! rust on everything!

    It has been fairly cold - around 7* - the last couple weeks, and then yesterday this sudden "mini heatwave" they're calling it started up. It was about 24* yesterday, and humid as all get out. I had a tough time getting the finish I was spraying to dry, because it was so humid. It's still pretty much the same today, and it didn't get that cold last night. I assume this had something to do with the weather change, but can anyone explain to me exactly what happened? I mean, 5 years in this shop, and nothing like this has ever happened before!

    Also, any thoughts on prevention? I normally clean and spray bostik topcote about twice a year, and that's always been fine, but now I'm wondering.

    Anyone?

    Thanks!

  • thrinfo
    replied
    Here in north of Montreal, happen the same, I've just wax them with microcrystaline the day before, the humidity was to high with the heat, even the humidity on the pavement took a very long time to dry out, and it was in full sun.

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  • Egon
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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    For cast iron tool tables I like applying naval jelly, cleaning it off and then melting paraffin wax onto the surface. Follow up with a heat gun and scrape the excess wax off.

    Seems to to work for me and leaves the tops smooth & slippery.

    Shovelling snow now at minus 20C means icicles on facial hair and ice layers under the Gortex.

    Picking tomatoes mid oct. is enjoyable! As is smelling the roses by the back stoop!
    Last edited by Egon; 10-12-2018, 07:29 AM.

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  • Rusty
    replied
    Originally posted by callee View Post

    I dunno, it wasn't fun cleaning all those tables yesterday, but I think I'd rather do that than shovel snow in september!
    When the perspiration rolls down your back and drops in your eyes maybe the snow would be appealing. LOL

    Luckily I haven't shovelled yet and having lived in both places you get more snow than I do. Bottom line,,,,,,there's advantages and disadvantages from coast to coast.

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  • timberframe
    replied
    Sort of like how your cold beer from the fridge can form condensation on it without the overall air volume of your kitchen being anywhere near the dew point.

    This analogy was always effective with students.

    B

    Leave a comment:


  • John Bartley
    replied
    Originally posted by timberframe View Post

    The dew point typically refers to the full volume of air, and the point at which air reaches saturation and water starts to form in droplets. The cold cast iron caused the little film of air immediately next to it to cool and precipitate out It's water (reach the dew point) and form condensation. I'll bet this was simple condensation shortly after he loaded up in the morning, then the shop only warmed up during the day increasing the carrying capacity of the air. This is why the surfaces were dry when he touched them later, because the air "re-evaporated" it.
    Exactly. We agree.

    Leave a comment:


  • callee
    replied
    Originally posted by Rusty View Post
    Move to Alberta and you can forget all that nonsense. LOL
    I dunno, it wasn't fun cleaning all those tables yesterday, but I think I'd rather do that than shovel snow in september!

    Leave a comment:


  • timberframe
    replied
    Originally posted by John Bartley View Post

    That's the definition of dew point. He opened the door, in flooded all that humid air and that tiny environment in the shop became a little dew point event. As long as the "cold sinks" aka "equipment" were able to cool the air around them enough to cause condensation it continued. I see it in my shop all the time in the spring. I've seen it cause fog in my shop.
    The dew point typically refers to the full volume of air, and the point at which air reaches saturation and water starts to form in droplets. The cold cast iron caused the little film of air immediately next to it to cool and precipitate out It's water (reach the dew point) and form condensation. I'll bet this was simple condensation shortly after he loaded up in the morning, then the shop only warmed up during the day increasing the carrying capacity of the air. This is why the surfaces were dry when he touched them later, because the air "re-evaporated" it.

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  • Rusty
    replied
    Move to Alberta and you can forget all that nonsense. LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • John Bartley
    replied
    Originally posted by timberframe View Post

    I doubt the whole shop (actually the air in the shop) reached the dew point, just the little film of air where it got rapidly cooled in close proximity to the heavy cast iron units.
    That's the definition of dew point. He opened the door, in flooded all that humid air and that tiny environment in the shop became a little dew point event. As long as the "cold sinks" aka "equipment" were able to cool the air around them enough to cause condensation it continued. I see it in my shop all the time in the spring. I've seen it cause fog in my shop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bryan @ Woodstock
    replied
    I did that a few days ago, the shop was cool, outside air hot and humid. Left the garage door up for 1/2 hour and all metal surfaces became wet. I wiped off everything and turned the heat on to try and warm/dry up the tools.

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  • timberframe
    replied
    Originally posted by John Bartley View Post
    What happened? ... sometime over the last day your shop got to a dewpoint. Solution might be a dehumidifier during the spring and fall? You've been five years in the shop and this is the first time it's happened, so I wouldn't spend the company savings trying to fix it.
    I doubt the whole shop (actually the air in the shop) reached the dew point, just the little film of air where it got rapidly cooled in close proximity to the heavy cast iron units.

    Leave a comment:


  • Matt Matt
    replied
    I was doing a small glue up project about a month ago and this was for a brand new surface ground fixture I just made. Yes, I was using wood glue. The checking fixture was about 1/8” away from the glue up. I was quite surprised to see the small little rust stains that work in close proximity to the drying glue.

    I have two dehumidifiers that I move around between the two shops. I learn my lesson the hard way.

    I dropped a tree in February-ish, Planked it up middle of April and let it air dry re-stacked and stickered & covered. Brought it into the shop mid-November to give it a skim and normalize. Three planks 12/4 and I could not believe the humidity. My garage doors were sweating and windows. The heat was high enough In cast-iron (and shop) from attracting the moisture. But the cold services (garage door and windows) looked like somebody sprayed them with the hose.

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  • schor
    replied
    But it also means you might not be waxing your surfaces enough? I don't know how much treatment would be required.

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  • schor
    replied
    As other have said, humidity in the shop in the air from when you open the doors. I had a big problem when I started running a fan blowing out one window and in the other, all the humid air and it all landed on the machines overnight when dewpoint hit.

    Stopped that, never opened the windows again, got an ac/dehumidifier and ran that to keep things cool in the summer and dry in spring and fall. Never opened the bay door unless I had to and shut it immediately unless it was a nice dry day in the summer.

    Leave a comment:

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