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Happy to share my small garage shop with my wife's Honda!

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  • ShoestringMariner
    replied
    Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
    Smooth rubber is unbelievably slippery when wet.
    Rob
    I’ll have a closer look at ours. I wouldn’t call them smooth. But I also wouldn’t call them heavily textured either but you make a good point

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    Smooth rubber is unbelievably slippery when wet.
    Rob

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  • ShoestringMariner
    replied
    Originally posted by Canuck Bob View Post
    A quick question. Can a guy roll carts and tools with casters over horse matts?

    Well I've been off-line for awhile. After careful thought it is much less complicated to insulate well and seal the cracks then heat the garage above freezing.

    Horse matts friendly to tools and knees. Rock wool insulation said to not support mice and good fire protection. Tyvek barrier to deal with possible condensation and no need to paint. A free standing bench, 2X6 top, with a tool wall behind it, (3X6).

    Shop is a disaster but I'm promising pictures once build is underway.
    The mats we use at the shop are just plain rubber. So it sounds like they differ from the cow mats that Iamtooler mentioned, but perhaps only in texture. They are thick and heavy. Rolling carts over them is no problem. Although you might want to fashion a transition edge if you’re going to be rolling over the edges all the time.

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  • TwoBirds
    replied
    The downside of living a stones throw from the ocean is that I have a lot of trouble with rust, to the point I'm planning on making a fairly air tight cabinet with a tray for NoDamp to keep my tools that are prone to rusting in.

    2B

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  • Rusty
    replied
    Originally posted by Canuck Bob View Post
    A quick question. Can a guy roll carts and tools with casters over horse matts?

    Well I've been off-line for awhile. After careful thought it is much less complicated to insulate well and seal the cracks then heat the garage above freezing.

    Horse matts friendly to tools and knees. Rock wool insulation said to not support mice and good fire protection. Tyvek barrier to deal with possible condensation and no need to paint. A free standing bench, 2X6 top, with a tool wall behind it, (3X6).

    Shop is a disaster but I'm promising pictures once build is underway.
    I'm not sure I'm following your comments correctly but let me throw this out there for your consideration. If it's minus 20 outside and you open your garage to drive the car to work that minus 20 comes into the garage and if the garage is well insulated it will act exactly like a deep freeze does. It will maintain that temperature just like the freezer does.

    Leave a comment:


  • iamtooler
    replied
    no problem rolling small castors on cow mats, they are pebble grain one side and slitted the underside. They are heavy and awkward to handle alone.
    Rob

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  • Canuck Bob
    replied
    A quick question. Can a guy roll carts and tools with casters over horse matts?

    Well I've been off-line for awhile. After careful thought it is much less complicated to insulate well and seal the cracks then heat the garage above freezing.

    Horse matts friendly to tools and knees. Rock wool insulation said to not support mice and good fire protection. Tyvek barrier to deal with possible condensation and no need to paint. A free standing bench, 2X6 top, with a tool wall behind it, (3X6).

    Shop is a disaster but I'm promising pictures once build is underway.

    Leave a comment:


  • Canuck Bob
    replied
    I've no intention of painting tables and machine ways but everything else is fair game. The horse matt idea is super, thanks.

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  • Rusty
    replied
    Ok You have the dreaded southern Ontario humidity. BUT,,,, I lived there too and it ain't horrible if you simply use your tools and the weather isn't freezing one day and scorching the next. Hot moist air meats real cold metal and you got ...........etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kelly2008
    replied
    Originally posted by Rusty View Post
    Where is Arthur? Yes it makes a difference.
    Arthur is about 1 1/2 hours north west of Toronto.

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  • smallerstick
    replied
    Originally posted by Kelly2008 View Post
    Along these lines...... my shop is a literally an 8'x8' "niche" in our barn, with a door leading to the garage. Neither the barn or garage is heated. I can 't heat the shop as it has only three walls and none of them, or roof is insulated. And it is a barn, after all, filled with hay. The floor is cement.

    My only question is.....should I bring my tools and smaller power tools inside the house, to our uninsulated but heated basement? I don't want them to rust or be damaged over time.The barn/garage can be very damp on the floor, at least when spring comes. My tools are few; a miter saw, circ saw, two recip. saws, sanders, drills etc., your advice is greatly appreciated.
    I also use horse mats on the floor. $45 for 8'x4' 3/4 " mats. They really help.
    I'm not far from you, in Listowel. My shop is insulated but heated only when I am working in it, so I have the same concerns as you do with rust. The iron surfaces on the table saw, jointer and so on I keep coated with wax (Minwax furniture wax right now) and that seems to keep the rust away. The hand tools; planes, chisels and the like are treated with a light oil from time to time. They all live happily in the shop along with the portable power tools.
    If you are not using your tools in the winter and can spare the space in the basement, it might be an improvement over the barn.

    Horse mats are a great idea; really easy on the feet and legs and the price is right.

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  • Rusty
    replied
    Are you going to paint the table top on your equipment?

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  • Canuck Bob
    replied
    Walking around my shop it is obvious there is only one long term cure for rust, paint. Pictures of vintage iron can reveal nasty rust but the decades old painted surfaces are not rusted generally.

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  • tool fan
    replied
    I have a dedicated workshop and half of a 2 car garage for work spaces. Both are unheated. The garage is insulated but most of the time the garage door is open when I am working. Rust can be a problem in both locations unless I am diligent about dealing with it. My solution has been to coat the mechanical unpainted iron parts with fluid film and wax the flat top cast iron surfaces. Originally I used Johnson's paste wax but have replaced that with Briwax as Johnson's is not longer available. I try to keep my machines clean and watch for any sign of rust. If I spot something I use either a wire brush or scotch brite to clean it off and then reapply a coating. So far this has worked.
    Last edited by tool fan; 02-13-2019, 07:07 PM.

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  • Rusty
    replied
    Where is Arthur? Yes it makes a difference.

    Leave a comment:

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