Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Workshop Construction Building Code

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Workshop Construction Building Code

    I am about to build a workshop at the cottage (basically a garage 24X24). I am an experienced amateur having built several large sheds and even our cottage before it was an organized township. I now have to deal with a building inspector and have been trying to get up to speed on the requirements of the Ontario Building code, nailing requirements for the various structural elements as well as other things. I have been reading through the code to try and avoid problems with the building inspector but you almost require a law degree to get through it. Does anyone now a simplified source for the code requirements that is in plain English.

    The Cujman
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

    I cannot help with the simplified code source but suggest that you arrange a visit with the building inspector. I have found two types, those are are happy to help and those who seem to feel they are part police (as in gestapo!). Chances are good you will get lucky.

    As the very least he will tell you about the things that he will be most interested in, he may even point out a book that will meet your needs. If you plan to do your own wiring get a copy of the Simplified Code book available at most big box stores and connect with ESA early,

    As you know knocking out a building is a great source of achievement and pleasure!

    Best of luck!

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

      https://chbanl.ca/wp-content/uploads...nstruction.pdf

      http://www.penntruss.com/pages/pdfs/TJ-9503.pdf
      Last edited by Mark Nowicki; 04-21-2019, 02:49 PM.

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

        Thanks for the info. Built a deck at home last summer and had a terrible time with the inspector on every inspection. For the piers (12) he measured the diameter and depth of each one. Put his tape measure down one hole, eyeballed it from standing height said it is only 47 inches, call me when it is corrected and left. I re measured and it was 51 inches. So I am just trying to avoid time wasted with an inspector.

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

          That CMHC book Mark posted is the best guide I know of.

          Probably the easiest way to avoid confrontation with the BI is to overbuild. The thing is the building code is the lowest standard allowed by law. If you think about it meeting the building code and not having your building not meet the standards of human habitation isn't really something for a craftsman to be proud of.

          If you have approved permit drawings you're laughing. If the plans examiner has done his job properly 95% of what you need to know should be on the drawings. That leaves things like nailing schedules, air barrier and waterproofing details that aren't on the drawing but are required by code. The day you're doing these tasks look them up in the OBC. No one ever failed an inspection because they used 4 nails in a joist instead of three or used hurricane clips on their rafters when they weren't required but they did walk away with a better built house than the guy who just passed the code.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

            Here's a thought: see if you can find a young, assistant carpenter who works for an established building company who is looking to moonlight on the weekends with you. I did that almost every weekend when I was younger, and when we were saving up our down payment. An assistant carpenter may not be a code expert per se, but he likely will be trained simply to do things the proper way. I remember, for example, be trained on the job for truss installation. I was shown very specifically how many nails to put where, etc., and I did it exactly as I had been shown, or else the leas hand would tear a strip off. After a couple of years there was a large number of jobs that I just did a certain way because that's how I had been shown, and that's what I was used to. Later when I started reading the building code, I was surprised to find things like nailing schedules, and so on, and often found specific instructions mandating things be done the way I had been taught! Anyway, all that to say, a good assistant could probably work with you and give you quite a few pointers.
            smallerstick and Jerome like this.

            Comment

            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

              PM sent

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

                Build a shed or garage, not a woodworking shop as the electrical code will kill ya.

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

                  Originally posted by RV Sam View Post
                  Build a shed or garage, not a woodworking shop as the electrical code will kill ya.
                  Electrical code is no more stringent for a shop than it is for a shed. You just need more in a shop. There's nothing that says that a shop must have X number of receptacles of X ampacity. Just like with a shed, you put in what will be needed.

                  Whether you're putting receptacles & lighting in a shed or a shop, it still needs to be safe and adequate.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

                    When I built a workshop in London ON I first had trouble getting it by the building dept due to zoning (woodworking is light industrial zoning) I changed the title of the drawing to "hobby shop" and resubmitted it otherwise unchanged and it was approved without a problem

                    Electrical was another matter. I got a home owners electrical permit. The inspections went smooth as silk .... not a single comment from the inspector. Then about a week later I got a notice in the mail from the ESA about having non CSA approved equipment in my shop and a charge of $125 x 6 or $750 to get my equipment approved ..... this was in 1991 so it was a serious amount of money. The machines I had were all Rockwell - Delta or Canadian General. All machines and motors were CSA approved what the ESA was saying was even though the machines and motors were CSA approved once I put them together the entire machine I built wasn't.

                    My solution was to call up ESA and tell them I destroyed the equipment ..... they were satisfied with that. I didn't actually destroy them in fact I'm still using some of these machines to this day. I can see how some people would be caught by this scam and paid an ESA inspector to simply lay hands on their machines and bill for $750 .... and it is a scam IMO
                    Last edited by dave_k; 04-23-2019, 01:41 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

                      Roger that Dave K.. Dust proof connectors and all electrical boxes enclosed in dust tight containers also is a huge expense. Been there and done it. This is / was Ontario up to a few years ago anyway. Fine dust can be very explosive and that was there concern. Also will need an approved dust collection system, not a shop vac.

                      Comment

                      • Thread Continues Below...

                      • #12

                        Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

                        I had some work done on a dining room addition by an electrician who used to be an inspector. He was in my shop and said that if it was a commercial shop, not hobby, I would need dust-proof components.
                        FWIW,
                        billh

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

                          Tay Township, here on Georgian Bay, has a 5 or 6 page guide they hand out with the permit application that details out when “below frost line” footings must be used. It is determined by footprint square footage and whether it is a residence or outbuilding, and also if it is connected to main residence. The building inspector can answer any questions about framing requirements. Just ask.
                          Me: How do you spell “apathy”?
                          Reply: Who cares!

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: Workshop Construction Building Code

                            As an electrical contractor, I've done a fair bit of work in wood shops, including the full install of a large (around 60,000 sq ft) cabinet shop and none of them required dust tight wiring methods. Only the spray room, which had 4 spray booths and the drying conveyors, needed anything special, and it was all explosion proof (Cl. I, Div. I) wiring. Oh, and the bag house for the dust collection system was all dust tight (Cl. II, Div. I)

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X