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Does your shop apron do this?

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  • cmzinbc
    replied
    Hi there PP,
    The waist tie height on my apron is somewhat adjustable depending on how the shoulder straps are adjusted. I have mine adjusted so that the waist tie rides slightly above my iliac crests when I am wearing the apron over typical indoor working clothing. For me the waist belt is usually not very tight, just snug enough to keep everything in its place. Another way of determining where the apron sits would be to make a fist with your hands in the pockets, for me I like the bottom of the fist to be on the bottom of the pocket with my arms more or less fully extended, so I adjust the shoulder straps to make mine fit that way.
    Your point about safety is valid, and were one to carry heavy objects in the upper pocket it might be an issue. For me, I find that my apron sits fairly flat and I have not noticed any issues with bulging and or sag in the chest area etc. (see my photo no 2 in post no 1, this post shows what I typically carry. Re-reading that post, I have dropped the chalk pencil but still like having the extra pencil slot...)
    I think one waist strap is enough and a second one would only make the apron more complicated to put on although my preference with an apron would go to functional minimalism if that makes sense. I like what has been done to mine.
    I am right hand dominant and usually keep my 3/4"x16' tape in the left hand pocket but said tape can sometimes make its way to the right hand pocket. In the end I am just as complicated and contradictory as the antivaxer that has lunch at Macdonalds every day.
    Hope that helps with your project.
    cheers,
    Mark

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  • ThePracticalPeasant
    replied
    cmzinbc
    callee

    And anyone else...

    Positioning of the tie(s): I noticed in the images of the two aprons pictured in this thread, there is what looks to be a single tie up around the chest. My instinct would be to put the tie lower, around the belly. Though this might result in a sag in the chest area when leaning forward, it would provider better support for contents of lower (likely bigger / heavier) pockets.

    I feel that a shop apron for a wood/leather worker should be light and unobtrusive but still needs to support the weight of a few hand-tools. I question whether the ideal apron should have two ties lined up with the tops of the two banks of pockets for support, or a single one for comfort.

    Thoughts?

    Edit: You two gents righties or lefties?
    Last edited by ThePracticalPeasant; 12-22-2021, 10:01 AM.

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  • cmzinbc
    replied
    KenL,
    I was doing some metal work this afternoon and wore coveralls (don’t tell anyone!) for the job; no butler though so I had to do all the heavy lifting by myself, bummer! Might be getting a little closer to needing a walk-in locker myself though...

    Marty & Gord,
    I’m not trying to sell anything here, aprons, pants, underwear or laundry soap. Especially laundry soap to this crowd!
    Really happy that you have both found solutions that work for you. As for the rest of us, it sounds like we should just be happy that someone is still making aprons for less than a fifteen minute ride in a rocket ship.
    cheers,
    Mark

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  • Gord in Newmarket
    replied
    Hi Paul,

    With all the PPE required for spraying, it must get really hot while spraying in the summer heat. I can see wearing coveralls and that’s about it. On a number of occasions I’ve seen woodworkers wearing or not wearing clothing that I certainly wouldn’t, but hey, everyone is different.

    If some woodworkers like to wear an apron while working, good for them I say. Just because it’s never really worked for me doesn’t mean it won’t work for others. If something makes your job easier, safer, more efficient and more comfortable then why not go that route. Hats off to all those who wear aprons and benefit from them.

    Gord

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  • Paul O in Paris
    replied
    Originally posted by Gord in Newmarket View Post
    Working naked was out of the question, most days,
    Geez Gord, and here I was thinking you were a free spirited creative kind of guy

    I must admit though that that modus operandi had crossed my mind on several occasions when faced with a whole office of furniture to refinish during one of our Ontario hot and unbearably humid summer periods, especially as I have to wear some pretty heavy duty protective stuff when stripping (the furniture that is)! That inner voice said not a good idea to try this in the buff!! So I sweated it out.

    Back on topic: I have at least three shop aprons but got tired of the pockets filling up with debris from sanding or other shop activities. This frustration together with catching them on various pieces of equipment in a rather cramped space prompted me to have the wife sew the pockets closed. I can now wear the aprons when actually doing woodworking tasks, and change into a light weight, pocketless, full body coverall when spraying, which may or may not go over clothes on those hot summer days

    Paul
    Last edited by Paul O in Paris; 12-01-2021, 07:58 PM.

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  • Gord in Newmarket
    replied
    Years ago I used to wear a shop apron and at the time I thought it was ideal for having quick and easy access to a pencil, small square and a tape measure, you know, the essentials. But like others, I’d snag a pocket, clasp or apron strap on a vise handle, bench corner or piece of machinery so I ditched that idea for a pocket less smock. The pocket less smock didn’t last long either, I was always pulling up the sleeves when using the table saw and other machinery.

    Working naked was out of the question, most days, so now I have a number of pencils, small squares and tape measures scattered around the shop so I’m always in arm’s reach of what I need.

    Gord

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  • MartyFromKingston
    replied
    Hey, Mark,

    There are indeed times when it could catch on the edge of a machine, but because it's so easy to move around on its belt, it's become second nature to do so.

    For me, aprons are a thing of the past.

    Originally posted by cmzinbc View Post
    Marty,
    I would call the electrical pouch approach a “Half Normer,” as it sounds quite similar to what I remember seeing Norm from the Yankee carpenter TV show wear. IIRC he wore a classic double carpenters pouches, for a “Full Normer.” For full points you must speak with a heavy New England accent and smile at the camera...
    For me a pouch would be way to catchy; hooking on saw fences, vise handles, knobs, etc. Happy that it works for you though and expect it will outlast most aprons to boot.
    PP,
    Interesting to hear that you are really running with the canvas on this. I will measure up my existing apron tomorrow and then get back to you with actual and ideal apron dimensions and an updated list of what I carry along with other apron thoughts.
    cheers,
    Mark

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  • ThePracticalPeasant
    replied
    Originally posted by KenL View Post
    Speaking only for myself, I have to be pretty organized to keep track of things. Cleaning up after myself is one of those organizational details that helps keep me sane (or at least what passes for it) in my workshop! There were a few insights into how the other people here do things that would be an unmitigated disaster for me but it has been a fun thread so far.
    You're not the only one, though I do it out of necessity. Tools always go back to their proper spots immediately after a task is complete, even if I might need one or more of the tools for the next task...
    If I don't, I'll never find anything or get anything done.

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  • cmzinbc
    replied
    KenL, the prince Charles of woodworking...
    Those guys who thought they would get a little status boost from a new Festool drill will just be standing in the corner with their mouth open when you and the butler show up on site!
    cheers,
    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • KenL
    replied
    Originally posted by cmzinbc View Post
    You sound very organized and efficient Ken. Do you have a walk in locker to keep all those aprons in order? After reading your post, I have a strong mental image of you beavering away in the shop with a butler two steps behind to make sure you have the appropriate apron on for the next task...
    Like Marty said earlier, lots of different approaches here.
    Mark
    I never thought of a butler! A good idea though he would have to work pretty cheap. In the meanwhile, I hang the aprons on the back of the door on some big IKEA sourced hooks whereas the leather pouches live in the tall cabinet just beside the door!

    I am very organized because I have to be LOL but efficient is another target altogether. Someday maybe.

    Love the image you conjured!

    Ken

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  • cmzinbc
    replied
    You sound very organized and efficient Ken. Do you have a walk in locker to keep all those aprons in order? After reading your post, I have a strong mental image of you beavering away in the shop with a butler two steps behind to make sure you have the appropriate apron on for the next task...
    Like Marty said earlier, lots of different approaches here.
    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • KenL
    replied
    Interesting takes on the old shop apron question; is it nobler to get filthy dirty around the machine than to try to stay clean? I have a few different aprons for the shop; one for turning with a snug collar and flapped pockets (my daughter custom designed and made it for me); one a Busy Bee one that fills full of sawdust since the pockets gape open but it is a pretty sturdy apron; an older Mastercraft denim apron that I use around the metal working tools since it has no pockets to fill with swarf; a Kluny's electrician's pouch for my wiring related tools; and a Kluny's double pouch carpenter's apron that I use whenever I am working on carpentry projects, a really rare event nowadays. I rarely wear an apron when doing hand tool work at the workbench since every tool is within an arm's length or so and it is really very clean work.

    That said, when any of my aprons get dusty, I just vacuum them clean. I vacuum my clothes too before I traipse through the rest of the house; it saves a lot of potential friction!

    Speaking only for myself, I have to be pretty organized to keep track of things. Cleaning up after myself is one of those organizational details that helps keep me sane (or at least what passes for it) in my workshop! There were a few insights into how the other people here do things that would be an unmitigated disaster for me but it has been a fun thread so far.

    Ken

    Leave a comment:


  • Randy in Calgary
    replied
    Originally posted by MartyFromKingston View Post
    The pouch system works perfectly for me.


    Norm!

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  • Doug G
    replied
    Originally posted by callee View Post

    I grew up in hamilton and had several family members who worked in the steel mills. Our first house was in the lower east side in the shadow of the mills, and in the morning you could brush the steel dust off your car with a snow brush! Anyone's guess what our lungs looked like!
    in school everyone wanted their dad to work at dofasco rather than stelco. Stelco was union, and so every couple years would have to go on strike. Dofasco was clever, and would wait until dofasco signed its latest agreement, then offer all its employees just a little bit better, so as to keep them from wanting to unionise. As a result, come christmas time all the stelco kids would go with their folks to the company christmas party and come home with, for example, a generic FM radio as a gift. Then the dofasco kids would go to their christmas party and come home with sony walkmen! I heard after I moved away both companies got bought up by bigger american or european firms, and in short order dofasco unionised.
    Yeah, a lot of that dust came from the coke ovens, filthy place to work or live near.
    I remember the Dofasco Christmas parties, I attended them long before I worked there. My mother was a safety inspector for the department of labour, the first female inspector back in the sixties. We always got an invite to the Dofasco Christmas party including a gift until, if I recall I turned sixteen.
    When I worked there, I recall talking to guys who had worked at Stelco who said they much preferred Dofasco for some of the reasons you mentioned but also because there was a completely different relationship between labour and management. Much more of a team feeling because they had profit sharing so anything that wasted company money took money out of your profit share.

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  • callee
    replied
    Originally posted by Doug G View Post

    Reminds me of the summer job when I was going to McMaster for my Engineering degree. I worked at Dofasco in the maintenance department, one summer in the bearing shop and three summers in coal handling and coke ovens. I had mixed feelings about Monday and Friday mornings. Friday morning was end of the week looking forward to the weekend but grungiest clothes from a week's work, Monday morning was freshly washed clothes but the start of a work week. After all these years I still remember the different feeling putting on clean work clothes vs filthy ones. That and often showering twice, once at work before changing into street clothes and a second time at home when I realized I was still dirty, steel mills are dirty places to work, especially back then, probably still now. Much prefer sawdust to coal dust.
    I grew up in hamilton and had several family members who worked in the steel mills. Our first house was in the lower east side in the shadow of the mills, and in the morning you could brush the steel dust off your car with a snow brush! Anyone's guess what our lungs looked like!
    in school everyone wanted their dad to work at dofasco rather than stelco. Stelco was union, and so every couple years would have to go on strike. Dofasco was clever, and would wait until dofasco signed its latest agreement, then offer all its employees just a little bit better, so as to keep them from wanting to unionise. As a result, come christmas time all the stelco kids would go with their folks to the company christmas party and come home with, for example, a generic FM radio as a gift. Then the dofasco kids would go to their christmas party and come home with sony walkmen! I heard after I moved away both companies got bought up by bigger american or european firms, and in short order dofasco unionised.

    Leave a comment:

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